White Sox release SoxFest schedule

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White Sox release SoxFest schedule

Friday, Jan. 27 (4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.)

Autographs: Gordon Beckham, Joe Crede, John Danks, Paul Konerko, A.J. Pierzynski, Dayan Viciedo
Photo stage: A.J. Pierzynski, Gordon Beckham
Seminars: "State of the Game" with Bud Selig and Hawk Harrelson, "Your 2012 White Sox" with Kenny Williams and Robin Ventura, "View from the Infield" with Gordon Beckham, Paul Konerko and Alexei Ramirez

Saturday, Jan. 28 (9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.)

Autographs: Joe Crede, Adam Dunn, Paul Konerko, Brent Morel, A.J. Pierzynski, Alexei Ramirez, Frank Thomas, Dayan Viciedo
Photo stage: John Danks, Brent Morel, Alexei Ramirez
Seminars: "Your 2012 White Sox" with Robin Ventura and his coaching staff, "World Series Memories" with members of the 2005 White Sox, "Arms Race" with Philip Humber, John Danks and Chris Sale

Sunday, Jan. 29 (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.)
Autographs: Joe Crede, John Danks, Gavin Floyd, Brent Morel, Jake Peavy, Alexei Ramirez, Robin Ventura, Dayan Viciedo
Photo stage: Jake Peavy, Frank Thomas, Dayan Viciedo
Seminars: "World Series Memories" with members of the 2005 White Sox, "From the Draft to the Big Leagues" with Rich Hahn, Buddy Bell and Doug Laumann, "White Sox Sluggers" with Joe Crede, Bill Melton and Frank Thomas

Rick Hahn won't 'publicly point fingers' at Robin Ventura for White Sox struggles

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Rick Hahn won't 'publicly point fingers' at Robin Ventura for White Sox struggles

NEW YORK — White Sox general manager Rick Hahn has no intention of second-guessing his manager, especially not in public.

As a three-week long tail spin continues to bring the White Sox closer toward .500, calls for Robin Ventura’s job have grown louder. The White Sox manager has received his fair share of criticism for game management during a stretch in which the club is 4-15. While Hahn said Tuesday he reviews the decision-making process with Ventura and his coaches in private, he doesn’t want to point fingers to avoid causing any unnecessary distractions.

“Part of the reason we are all drawn to this initially was as fans, and fans focus on the lack of results when things are struggling and look for areas to assign blame,” Hahn said. “For me, I don’t think it’s really in anyone’s best interest when things are going bad to publicly point fingers or second guess or assign blame like that on any individual.

“It’s more important to rally together as a group and focus on putting yourselves in the best position to win the next game ahead of you, which is all you can control at this point. That’s really from a public standpoint all that I think needs to be said. We are in a position right now where all we can control is winning tonight and we are doing everything in our power to put ourselves in the best position to do that.”

Once 23-10, the White Sox have run into an abundance of frustration the past few weeks. The team has gone from leading the American League Central by six games to dropping into third place and trailing the Kansas City Royals by two.

Ventura, who is in the final season of his current contract, has received heavy criticism toward the back end of what started Tuesday as a seven-game losing streak. Most recently, Ventura’s bullpen management in a series-opening loss Friday at Kansas City has been called into question as was his decision to bunt with his No. 3 hitter in Monday’s loss at the New York Mets.

“Look, the game management realm is 100 percent the manager’s purview, and I’m not going to stand here and second guess any decisions he’s making,” Hahn said. “Obviously we all have the benefit of hindsight right now in evaluating a decision. Our conversations in private are about the conversations that lead up to the decision or the thought process that leads up to the decision. And from my standpoint, it’s important to make sure that process is sound and that he and our coaches all have the right information when they’re making a strategic in-game decision, and I’m very pleased with where they are from an information standpoint and from a process standpoint. But it’s not my place, certainly publicly, to second guess in-game managerial decisions.”

As for his decisions, Hahn has done his best not to let emotion rule his. Constantly on the lookout for roster upgrades, including San Diego’s James Shields, Hahn said his team’s slide has made it trying at times to remain patient. But Hahn doesn’t want to make any kind of move — whether for a player or a personnel decision — with emotion involved.

“There is a strong temptation when you’re not in between the white lines or in the dugout to try to do something to have a greater impact between 7 and 10 each night,” Hahn said. “And there’s always that temptation to do something to improve your chances to win. But when things aren’t going well, that becomes perhaps a little bit greater, and that’s when you have to guard yourself against doing something strictly emotional or reactionary that’s going to cause perhaps more long-term damage than any short-term benefit from doing something. That applies to a trade or any sort of change to any process you’ve got going on and anyone in uniform. You don’t want to do something that may provide you with the short-term feeling like you’ve done something to have an impact when you’re going to wind up doing more harm than good by doing that move.”

Todd Frazier: White Sox finding different ways to lose

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Todd Frazier: White Sox finding different ways to lose

NEW YORK -- The White Sox just can’t seem to get back on track.  

Over their last 19 games, a once-hot team has continually created new ways to lose.

On Monday, the White Sox couldn’t produce a clutch hit against Matt Harvey and lost 1-0 to the New York Mets at Citi Field to extend their losing streak to seven. Harvey retired Todd Frazier and J.B. Shuck with two in scoring position and New York got a late Neil Walker homer to pull ahead.

Over the weekend against Kansas City, the bullpen faltered and allowed 14 earned runs in 6 1/3 innings. At some point before that, the team’s starting pitching didn’t come through or a series of poor offensive performances surfaced. All of their maladies have added up to a 4-15 stretch, including 12 losses by two runs or fewer.

“It’s just frustrating losing, whether it’s one or two runs,” third baseman Todd Frazier said. “You know, a strikeout here or a base hit here and we could have swept the Royals. It’s going to take one thing to just get us going and it hasn’t happened.

“When we were winning, it seemed like a different guy every day. Now, it’s the opposite -- a different guy every day not getting the job done. It was me today. When you have opportunities, whether you are slumping or not, see the ball, hit the ball. That’s baseball. Don’t put too much on your shoulders and just play the game.

“We talk about it all the time: Do your job. And I didn’t do it.”

White Sox: Bad luck returns for Jose Quintana

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White Sox: Bad luck returns for Jose Quintana

NEW YORK -- Time for Jose Quintana to find a new four-leaf clover or lucky horseshoe.

His bad luck seems to have resurfaced.

Even though he lowered his earned-run average to 2.13, Quintana earned a fourth straight loss on Monday afternoon as the White Sox dropped a 1-0 decision to the New York Mets. Quintana yielded a seventh-inning home run to Neil Walker, his only blemish in a sturdy seven-inning performance, but was outpitched by Matt Harvey. The defeat dropped Quintana’s record to 5-5.

“This is stuff we see out of him all the time,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “If we could score, he’d have a better record, and everybody would know his name.”

Quintana made it evident early on he was capable of stopping a White Sox losing streak that now stands at seven. He struck out four in a row, including the side in the second inning.

The left-hander, whose streak of 34 straight starts with four or fewer runs allowed is tied with Jake Arrieta for the longest active streak in the majors, induced an inning-ending double play in the fourth. He faced only three over the minimum through six innings and matched zeroes with Harvey.

But Walker came through in the seventh inning and attached an undeserved ‘L’ to Quintana’s name in the box score. During his four-game losing streak, Quintana has a 3.41 ERA in 26 1/3 innings.

“I’m sure he could easily have a much better record over the course of his career if he had a little bit more run support for sure,” catcher Alex Avila said. “But credit to him, he keeps going out there and pitching good games.”

The loss dropped Quintana’s career record to 38-39 despite a 3.35 ERA in 815 innings. Fifteen of those losses have come since the beginning of the 2015 season even though Quintana has a 3.04 ERA in those 43 starts. He’s 14-15 in that span.

The grand total of support Quintana has received in those losses --- 16, including one run or fewer over 12 starts.

While he was speaking about the team after Monday’s loss, Quintana might as well have been discussing himself.

“Right now, we try to get a first win,” Quintana said. “We try to forget everything, the losses, and start again. Tomorrow we’ll try to get the first win.”