Wrapping up day 2 of SoxFest

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Wrapping up day 2 of SoxFest

From SoxFest on Saturday:

Adam Dunn is ready to move on from his disastrous 2011 season, reports Chuck Garfien. It's not something he wants to talk about anymore, and he actually wasn't asked about it as much in his seminar appearance Saturday -- most fans concentrated on telling Dunn how much they supported him in addition to asking questions about his offseason regimen.

Gordon Beckham is part of the crew that includes Dunn -- and Alex Rios -- that need to have bounce-back years for the White Sox to contend, by most accounts. But Beckham says he's not going to entertain those thoughts, thus avoiding putting any added pressure on himself.

One guy who hardly needs a bounce-back year is Brent Lillibridge, who hopes to parlay his growth in 2011 into a successful 2012 and, eventually, a starting role.

It's new to Jeff Manto to be in a market in which position coaches are sought out by the fans and media. The new White Sox hitting coach spoke to CSN about that "unusual" aspect to the job, as well as the approach he's going to take to Dunn, Rios, and the rest of the team.

In a way, Kenny Williams actually welcomed the smattering of boos that greeted him during Friday's opening ceremonies, as he notes the last two times he was jeered at SoxFest -- 2004 and 2007 -- the Sox made the playoffs the next season.

Robin Ventura participated in spring training as a player for 17 seasons, but come thing spring, he'll have to coordinate his first one as a manager. Lucky for him, he has a few coaching veterans on his staff who will be instrumental in having everything run smoothly.

Ventura mentioned during a seminar that he's not going to be afraid to sit a player down, no matter who they are or what they're making. He also mentioned that he won't treat everyone the same -- like Paul Konerko vs., say, Gregory Infante -- but he will try to treat everyone fairly.

Brent Morel told CSN he was too concerned with making contact during most of 2011, but in September, he concentrating on being more selective and driving the ball. That tweak in his approach produced eight home runs and 15 walks, for what it's worth.

Rick Hahn on the perception the White Sox don't like on-base percentage: "Yeah, it's like we don't like puppy dogs, chocolate and Christmas. Everybody likes those things." Hahn also joined Buddy Bell, Doug Laumann and Nick Capra in discussing the state of the White Sox farm system, which Larry has some thoughts on after looking at Baseball America's prospect handbook.

Don Cooper doesn't like to read too much into 7 23 innings of work, but Addison Reed was impressive enough in that cup of coffee last season that Coop has him as a lock to be in the 2012 bullpen.

Report: Talks surrounding Chris Sale intensifying between White Sox, Nationals

Report: Talks surrounding Chris Sale intensifying between White Sox, Nationals

The White Sox haven't wavered on their asking price for Chris Sale, and their patience may be paying off.

According to FOX's Ken Rosenthal, trade talks surrounding Sale are intensifying between the White Sox and Nationals that would likely include Washington's two top prospects in RHP Lucas Giolito and OF Victor Robles.

Despite the trade chatter heating up, a source told CSN's Chuck Garfien that the White Sox aren't close to a deal and continue to talk with other teams regarding the White Sox ace.

In an exclusive interview with CSN earlier on Monday, White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf said trading Sale would be 'very hard' on multiple levels, particularly being satisfied with the package coming back.

Perhaps it's only a matter a time before Sale gets traded, but the White Sox have made it clear they won't make a deal unless they're maximizing their return.

Despite Chris Sale rumors, White Sox say they have contingencies in place for a rebuild

Despite Chris Sale rumors, White Sox say they have contingencies in place for a rebuild

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — Though the majority of reports Monday suggested Chris Sale would be the first piece to go in a potential rebuild, the White Sox say they have many contingencies.

The five-time All-Star pitcher was one of the hottest topics on the rumor mill at the first day of the Winter Meetings on Monday and figures to be all week. Tied to numerous teams either vying for his services or reportedly dropping out because of chairman Jerry Reinsdorf’s high-asking price of four can’t-miss prospects, the pursuit of Sale already has been established as one of the offseason’s top stories to follow. But general manager Rick Hahn — whose phone has constantly been recharging after what he describes as an “interesting few weeks” — said the White Sox aren’t limited to one major move to get their offseason underway. As long as someone pays up, the White Sox could deal any one of several players from a top-heavy and talented roster.

“What we are looking to do is deals that put ourselves in the strongest position possible for the long term and there’s no need for Player X to move before Player Y if we get to the right price point on any given deal,” Hahn said.

Hahn continued to make it perfectly clear Monday that the White Sox are interested in long-term moves. The days of quick fixes appear to be over with the hope being that a dramatic paradigm shift could one day prevent the franchise from enduring another eight-year long playoff drought.

The White Sox want to one day be able to provide sound replacements from within their own farm system, something Hahn has preached for years, but hasn’t yet been able to attain. Hahn said he’s encouraged about the potential returns from other teams and the prospect of reloading a thin farm system by trading several of the talented pieces from his roster.

But by no means would the direction the White Sox take be held up by one trade in particular. Given the White Sox have few bad contracts on the books, the team isn’t at a disadvantage of being in a position where it must trade Sale or Jose Quintana. If the White Sox deal either one of their All-Star pitchers or Todd Frazier, Melky Cabrera, Adam Eaton or anyone else, it would only be after they feel their price has been met.

“I think what we are looking to do is put ourselves in a position for extended success,” Hahn said. “The means for us to do that is by acquiring as much impact, controllable talent as we can over an extended period and continuing the efforts to build us up internationally and through the draft and adding to that potentially via trade.

“It’s not something that’s necessarily going to happen over night. It’s not something that I would expect to be completed while we are here in its entirety. It’s going to be a process potentially that takes some time. …

“We have alternatives in mind and alternative routes for putting the club together. We are pretty confident about what we want to try to accomplish and how that’s going to unfold. …

“We don’t want to be caught in between. But again, we’re not going to force that seven things have to get done or it’s not worth doing one. It’s a process.”