Braves 15, Phillies 13: Yes, you read that right

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Braves 15, Phillies 13: Yes, you read that right

From Comcast SportsNetATLANTA (AP) -- Chipper Jones' bad left knee has limited his playing time at the start of his final season, so he says it's important to make the most of his chances."When I am in there, I want to make a splash," Jones said. "I did it tonight."Jones hit a two-run homer in the 11th inning and the Atlanta Braves overcame Carlos Ruiz's seven RBIs to outlast the Philadelphia Phillies 15-13 on Wednesday night.The seesaw game saw the Braves rally from a 6-0 deficit against Roy Halladay, then come back from four runs down in the eighth."It was just a weird game all the way around," said Brian McCann, who hit a grand slam off Halladay. "Stuff you've never seen happen."Befitting the crazy game, McCann was poked in the eye with an errant high-five from teammate Michael Bourn after the homer.Dan Uggla led off the Atlanta 11th with a single. Jones just missed a homer on a ball that landed barely foul to right, then connected against Brian Sanches (0-1). He began his path around the bases with a slow journey to first base as he and his teammates savored the dramatic moment and Braves fans stood and cheered."What a cool moment that was, not only for Chipper, but for the rest of us out there to enjoy that, to watch that," McCann said. "To see him walk down the first base line like that, that's a treat for all of us."Jones' homer ended the Braves' eight-game losing streak to the Phillies, dating back to last season. He said the homer will hold a special place on his career highlights."That's right up there just because the team that we're kind of shooting for in the division obviously is the Phillies," said Jones, who turned 40 on April 24. "Until somebody knocks them off, they're the team to beat."Jones is third all-time among switch-hitters with 458 homers, trailing only Mickey Mantle and Eddie Murray. Including his time in the minor leagues, Jones said it was his 500th homer as a professional."I'm not going to get there at the major league level, but to hit 500 homers as a professional is pretty cool," he said.It was the highest-scoring extra-inning game in the majors since Cleveland beat Kansas City 15-13 in 10 innings in 2006, according to STATS LLC.Ruiz had three hits, including a three-run homer in the seventh and a three-run double in the eighth. He was the first Phillies hitter to drive in seven runs since Ryan Howard against the Yankees on June 20, 2006."He's been awesome for us," said Halladay of Ruiz. "I think that's what hurts most. When you have games like this, your teammates are out there grinding and getting it done and I didn't. And that was the difference, really."That's the toughest one, letting those guys down who really got it done today."Halladay had his worst start in five years. He gave up 12 hits -- one below his career high -- and eight runs in 5 1-3 innings."Honestly, I felt good," Halladay said after seeing his ERA climb from 1.95 to 3.40. "There were some that I didn't execute. It wasn't anything else."Laynce Nix also hit a three-run double for the Phillies.Braves closer Craig Kimbrel couldn't hold a 13-12 lead in the ninth. Shane Victorino's two-out infield hit drove in Juan Pierre, who walked and stole second and took third on a grounder.Halladay was tagged by McCann's fifth career slam in the fifth. The former Cy Young winner had not allowed as many earned runs since May 5, 2007, when he gave up nine runs in 5 1-3 innings at Texas.Martin Prado had three hits and drove in three runs, including a two-run single in the Atlanta eighth.Braves reliever Eric O'Flaherty blew an 8-6 lead before recording an out in the seventh. Ty Wigginton walked, pinch-hitter John Mayberry Jr. singled and Ruiz followed with his fourth homer to left for a 9-8 edge.Atlanta's Tommy Hanson gave up eight hits and four runs in 3 2-3 innings. It was his shortest start since he pitched 3 1-3 innings against the Mets on Aug. 6, 2011, in his last outing before he was placed on the disabled list for the remainder of the season with right shoulder tendinitis.NOTES:Phillies LHP Cliff Lee, on the 15-day disabled list with a strained left oblique muscle, threw in the bullpen before the game. If he has no discomfort, he plans another bullpen session on Saturday. If all goes well on Saturday, Lee is expected to come off the disabled list. ... Atlanta's Jason Heyward missed his third straight start with soreness around his right oblique muscle before entering the game as a pinch-hitter and remaining in right field. ... The Phillies placed 1B Jim Thome on the 15-day disabled list with tightness in his lower back and recalled C Erik Kratz from Triple-A Lehigh Valley. The move was made retroactive to Sunday. ... The three-game series ends on Thursday when Braves RHP Randall Delgado (2-2) starts against RHP Joe Blanton (2-3).

MMQB's Peter King's thoughts on Trubisky, Howard, White and the Bears offense

MMQB's Peter King's thoughts on Trubisky, Howard, White and the Bears offense

In just the last three NFL seasons the Bears have changed every significant skill position on the offensive side of the ball. Gone are quarterback Jay Cutler, running back Matt Forte, wide receivers Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery, and tight end Martellus Bennett.

It's a new era in Chicago for more reasons than one, and Monday Morning Quarterback's Peter King shared his thoughts on what that might look like in his latest NFL Power Rankings.

King has the Bears ranked 28th, ahead of just the New York Jets, Cleveland Browns and San Francisco 49ers. But he's optomistic on a few fronts.

  • Free-agent signing Mike Glennon is grinding his teeth over the drafting of QB Mitchell Trubisky (second pick in the draft), and he has one season to stake his claim for the job. (I wouldn’t be optimistic in the Glennon household.)
  • Second-round tight end Adam Shaheen will step in early in a prominent offensive role.
  • The starting quarterbacks from 2016—Jay Cutler and Brian Hoyer and Matt Barkley—were all let go, an odd development for a team that retains the same coach, offensive coordinator and GM
  • At quarterback, I don’t just assume that Glennon/Trubisky will automatically be better than what Chicago had last year. Thankfully, running back Jordan Howard came out of nowhere (the 2015 fifth round) to gain 1,313 yards, to rank a stunning second in the NFL. It’s vital he doesn’t have a sophomore slump. In short, I can’t see the Bears being .500 unless one of the quarterbacks emerges as a top 20 passer by early in the season.
  • Most important factor to this team this year: Of course it’s the quarterback race between Glennon and Trubisky. That one’s too obvious. There’s another one. Kevin White was the seventh pick of the 2015 draft. In two years, he’s played four of 32 games, caught zero touchdown passes, and had zero impact. This is the year the Bears have to see some degree of explosiveness and/or competence out of a player drafted ahead of Vic Beasley, Melvin Gordon and Marcus Peters.
  • Bears prediction of 10 words or less: Trubisky is the quarterback by Thanksgiving. It doesn’t matter.

King's final thought might be his most interesting. Trubisky starting by Thanksgiving would put the Bears in Week 12. Quarterbacks coach Dave Ragone doesn't seem intent on delegating any starting duties out in the preseason, but perhaps that would change as the season moves along. Shaheen will be asked to do plenty of learning and growing in his first season, while it's clear White needs a breakout season after the Bears moved on from Jeffery in the offseason.

Bears QB coach Dave Ragone doesn't mind this type of turnover

Bears QB coach Dave Ragone doesn't mind this type of turnover

John Fox hates drama within his locker room. Through his first two seasons, it's one of two things we've definitely learned (see departures like Brandon Marshall and Martellus Bennett, trading hubris for harmony). The other thing is his hiding lineups and injuries from the media as best as possible.

With first round pick Mitch Trubisky spending a good chunk of last week in Los Angeles for NFL-mandated rookie events, he returns, now full-time, into the quarterbacks room with the man brought in to start this season, Mike Glennon. Veterans Mark Sanchez and Connor Shaw will provide the sidebars. But it's Glennon who'll have to ignore a sense of déjà vu. Not feeling this is his Jameis Winston 2.0 all over again, as much as the blueprint indicates that's exactly what it is.

Perhaps more so than offensive cooridnator Dowell Loggains, it's quarterbacks coach Dave Ragone who will be in charge of taking the room's temperature. But he truly believes he won't be preoccupied with that as the Bears take the field this week for OTAs.

"It's one of those things, within a quarterback room, about helping the starter, getting that starter ready to play,"  Ragone said two Fridays ago, following the first day of rookie minicamp in Lake Forest. "For anyone who's ever been in that room, egos are not egos when there's a starting quarterback, then the guys behind him.

"Mike's a professional, as well as Mark and Connor. Mike's done a good job of not just embedding himself within the system, but with his teammates. The draft was over, he came in Monday, we went in the classroom and Mike was asking questions about protections. It was as professional as you could imagine."

On Tuesday Glennon will speak publicly for the first time since Trubisky's name was called April 27. The workouts are still non-contact, only in jersey tops and shorts, and an opportunity to see how well the system and rhythm with new receivers is grasped, and how snaps are split.

"It is our job, at the end of the day, to get the starter ready, and obviously getting everybody else feeling ready to play. So we'll figure that out as time progresses," Ragone said.

We'll have to wait until late July and August for a cleaner measure of how practice time is split up, and even then the priority is to get Glennon ready for 2017. But last weekend was Ragone's first chance to see Trubisky on the field, on Halas Hall property.  And he liked the way the signal caller of the future handled the most basic of basics.

"Just calling the system, the new plays, getting out there and having 11 guys line up where they're supposed to, being in charge of that. It's all a process," he said. "Every quarterback is different. They all have different strengths, different weaknesses. So when is a guy ready? When can he play? That doesn't even enter my thought process. To me it's getting each guy – a veteran or a rookie – coached to how we want them, get them ready to play, and then, obviously, playing to their strengths when they're on the field."

So just as he did waiting his turn at North Carolina, the plan (which can always change) is to have Trubisky needing to master "mental reps" for the third time in four years.

"When you're not in, getting the physical rep, mentally you have to go through those exact same mechanics:  How you view the defense, what you're seeing from the back end, where you would go with the football," Ragone said. "If you're not getting that physical rep, that's what you have to do. It'll be the same for everybody that way."

It's not like Trubisky is a stranger to Ragone, who stays close to coaches at his prep alma mater, St. Ignatius High School outside of Cleveland. When the Bears' interest in Trubisky intensified, it brought him back to a 2012 state playoff game between Ignatius and Mentor High School. A triple-overtime, 57-56 loss. Trubisky threw for 411 yards, and ran for 138 more.

"I've known about Mitchell since high school. My high school coaches still have scars of what he was able to do against them his senior year. I think every highlight that gets shown, that's against my high school, so we have a rule, we don't talk about that. It's like Fight Club in the quarterback room."

And with the signing of Glennon and the drafting of Trubisky, the quarterback move in between - of signing free agent Mark Sanchez through much local wailing and gnashing of teeth – now gains more clarity.

"This early on you can feel his being in different buildings, his presence about that," Ragone said. "His ability to relate things, from a personal side and professional side, and you can see the interaction he's already had with Mike and Connor. Those are invaluable. He's been through a lot in a nine-year career.  

"He's a very talented individual and has a lot of experience to draw from. He was a top 5 pick in a big media market (New York) in which he was asked to play (helping the Jets reach the AFC Championship game each of his first two years). He was also asked to play as a veteran, so telling Mike, 'Hey, I saw this…I did this.' To me, he's been a great asset so far."

So Ringmaster Ragone has more excitement than dread about that quarterback room's energy, experience and potential. And he's more interested in serving them than policing them, all with a great sense of respect for whom he's spending all that time with.

"Every quarterback I've been able to coach at this level has been an honor," he said. "I understand being a quarterback at this level. At the end of the day, there aren't many of them. You do the quick math, there's less than 100 that play at this level. I hold that with a very high esteem when you're the top of your position in what you do."