Bulls' draft pick will need to be a contributor

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Bulls' draft pick will need to be a contributor

For the first time since Taj Gibson was selected, the Bulls' draft pick this June will be expected to step in and make an immediate impact as a rookie, let alone be present at the start of the season. Unlike swingman Jimmy Butler, who was brought along slowly and mostly played spot minutes, or forward Nikola Mirotic, who continues to star in Spain's highly-competitive ACB league -- a dark-horse candidate to make the 2012 Spanish Olympic team, Mirotic won the coveted EuroLeague Rising Star award for the second consecutive season -- but won't make his NBA debut for at least a couple more seasons, whomever the Bulls pick this June will likely be thrown right into the fire.

With Derrick Rose set to miss a large portion of next season and the possibility that fellow All-Star Luol Deng is on the shelf for the beginning of the campaign if he opts to have left-wrist surgery following the Olympics, the Bulls won't enter October as a projected title contender and with some roster turnover bound to occur with the team holding options on free agents C.J. Watson, Ronnie Brewer and Kyle Korver, backup center Omer Asik a restricted free agent and their reserve peers John Lucas III, Brian Scalabrine and Mike James not under guaranteed contracts, simply put, the team will have some holes to fill. While it's likely that some of those players will be back and the front office will look to add some minimum-salary veterans due to the organization's lack of financial flexibility -- Rose, Deng, center Joakim Noah and power forward Carlos Boozer all have eight-figure contracts -- the Bulls' first-round draft pick can't just be a prospect for the future, like Butler was this season, or stashed overseas, like Asik was and now, Mirotic.

Granted, picking at the bottom of the first round because of their stellar regular-season record, the Bulls won't have the opportunity to pick a franchise-changing talent, such as Chicago native Anthony Davis, the University of Kentucky big man and consensus top prospect. But this is considered to be a deep draft and the selection of Gibson at No. 26 back in 2009 shows the Bulls have the aptitude to find a diamond in the rough.

Even assuming they won't trade up for a higher pick, there should be plenty of talent on the board that can help the team immediately and fill a need, but more importantly, be a major part of the Bulls' future championship push two seasons from now, when Rose will be a year removed from ACL surgery and contention for a title can fully resume. Butler was a safe pick last year, but with Brewer's potential departure, he also fills a need as a replacement backup swingman, one with the same defense-first mindset, as well as less expensive.

This time around, the Bulls would be wise to take more of a chance on a player whose current skill set fits an immediate need, countering head coach Tom Thibodeau's apparent preference to bring rookies along slowly, as evidenced by his use of Butler and Asik, as he only started giving the backup center more minutes the season before when injuries felled Noah. Though Korver's 5 million option for next season could cause the Bulls to blink at the price tag, his unique shooting ability on a team lacking outside marksmanship could mean his return, but pure shooters who are counted upon as rookies are rare, so that probably won't be the direction the team chooses in the draft.

Adding a rookie big man is an option, as you can never have enough size, but with Noah, Boozer and Gibson all returning, the post-player rotation won't have much available playing time, especially if the team matches potential mid-level exception offers for Asik from other teams, unless the Bulls prepare for his departure or Gibson's the following season The wings are another position of strength, as Deng would only miss a month or two if he has surgery, Rip Hamilton will be back as the starting shooting guard, Butler will back up both players and as stated, Korver and even Brewer could return, but even if neither or both is back, swingman is another position where the team will have a plethora of serviceable minimum-salary options in free agency.

This is a draft weak on point guards, the Bulls will likely either bring back Watson or look to sign a veteran floor general via free agency and it's a fair assumption that Thibodeau wouldn't trust his offense in the hands of a rookie anyway, so a true point guard wouldn't be necessary. Also, Lucas proved capable of playing second-string minutes this season and if he doesn't return, then another veteran with a similar contract will simply take his place.

One area the Bulls do need to address is finding another playmaking shot-creator, especially in Rose's absence, but also when he returns, though not a true point guard who would have to sit behind him or a slashing small forward who could cause a potential logjam at that position or duplicates Butler's abilities. Ideally, a combo guard with strong scoring instincts, solid passing ability, a reliable outside shooting stroke and a good defensive base to work with would be that player, but with the Bulls picking so late in the first round, the likes of Syracuse's Dion Waiters, Duke's Austin Rivers, Washington's Terrence Ross and Weber State's Damien Lillard, all prospects who have possess some of those qualities, will be off the board.

Instead, some of the more likely candidates to fill that duty include: Ross' Washington teammate Tony Wroten, a point guard with size, but who has garnered some concern about his shooting and decision-making ability that could cause his stock to drop enough that he could be available, though he has great explosiveness, passing and could be paired with Rose in the future; Kansas' Tyshawn Taylor, who never quite mastered being a floor general in college, but has good athleticism, can get in the lane and could defend both backcourt positions, a la Clippers second-year backup Eric Bledsoe; Kentucky's Doron Lamb, a tough and heady player, if not a mind-blowing athlete, but an excellent shooter with range; Vanderbilt's John Jenkins, like Lamb an underwhelming athlete and a tad undersized for an NBA shooting guard, but one of the draft's best pure shooters; Lamb's Kentucky backcourt partner Marquis Teague, the younger brother of Atlanta point guard Jeff Teague, not a pure point, but a quick driver with finishing ability and decent size; Oregon State's Jared Cunningham, a sleeper, but a big-time athlete and defensive pest with the ability to create on offense; Iona's Scott Machado, a pure point, but one with the maturity to potentially step into a backup role immediately, despite his lack of size; Memphis' Will Barton, a long, athletic and versatile wing who needs to add strengths, but has a nose for the ball and a variety of skills; Missouri sharpshooter Marcus Denmon, who played off the ball in college, is undersized for shooting guard, but has some intangibles to go with his scoring prowess; and Tennessee Tech's Kevin Murphy, one of the nation's leading scorers last season and an athletic wing who raised his stock with his play at the annual Portsmouth Invitational Tournament.

Clearly, there are a variety of options for the Bulls, including names not listed here and many who will be at the Berto Center for workouts in the coming weeks or back in Chicago for next month's NBA Pre-Draft Camp, but only one of whom will be selected by the organization, though others could play for the team's summer-league squad in Las Vegas in July. Thus, when league commissioner David Stern announces, "With the 29th pick, the Chicago Bulls select...," the player he names will have to be a contributor.

Blackhawks: Tommy Wingels fractures foot, will be ready for training camp

Blackhawks: Tommy Wingels fractures foot, will be ready for training camp

Tommy Wingels, who the Blackhawks acquired earlier this month, will miss 6-8 weeks after suffering a left-foot fracture during his offseason training. Team physician Dr. Michael Terry said in a statement that the Blackhawks, “anticipate a full recovery in 6-8 weeks and in time for training camp. We do not anticipate any long-term issues.”

The Blackhawks signed Wingels, a Wilmette native, to a one-year deal on July 1. Wingels will still be at this weekend’s convention.

Bears training camp preview: Three burning questions for the offensive line

Bears training camp preview: Three burning questions for the offensive line

With training camp starting next week, CSN Chicago’s Chris Boden and JJ Stankevitz are looking at three burning questions for each of the Bears’ position groups heading into Bourbonnais. Friday's unit: the offensive line. 

1. Will Kyle Long and Josh Sitton flip spots, and will it be effective?

One of the more intriguing storylines to come out of the Bears’ offseason program was the possibility of a Kyle Long-Josh Sitton guard swap, with Long moving from right to left and Sitton to left to right. The prevailing wisdom is that Long’s athleticism would be better suited for the pulls needed at left guard, while Sitton has made Pro Bowls at both positions. But is it prudent for the Bears to make this switch with Long still recovering from November ankle surgery and some nasty complications that came after it? He’s shown he’s skilled enough to already make one position switch on the offensive line (from right tackle to right guard), so there’s no reason to doubt he couldn’t handle another so long as he’s healthy. We’ll see where he is next week. 

“You want flexibility,” coach John Fox said. “You don’t want as much flexibility as we had to use a year ago because we had to play so many guys due to injury. But we’re messing around with (Sitton) and Kyle both playing opposite sides, whether one’s on the left, one’s on the right. We’ll get those looks in camp, we got plenty of time.”

2. Can Charles Leno Jr. capitalize on a contract year?

Leno has been a pleasant surprise given the low expectations usually set for seventh-round picks. He started every game in 2016, checking off an important box for John Fox — reliability. Whether Leno can be more than a reliable player at left tackle, though, remains to be seen (if the Bears thought he were, wouldn’t they have signed him to an extension by now?). He has one more training camp and 16 games to prove he’s worthy of a deal to be the Bears (or someone else’s) left tackle of the future. Otherwise, the Bears may look to a 2018 draft class rich in tackles led by Texas’ Connor Williams and Notre Dame’s Mike McGlinchey. 

“I know if I take care of my business out here, everything else will take care of itself,” Leno said. 

3. Will Hroniss Grasu survive the roster crunch?

A year ago, Grasu was coming off a promising rookie season and was in line to be the Bears’ starting center. But the Oregon product tore his ACL in August, and Cody Whitehair thrived after a last-minute move from guard to center. If the Bears keep eight offensive lineman this year, Grasu could be squeezed out: Leno, Long, Whitehair, Sitton and Bobby Massie are the likely starters, with Eric Kush and Tom Compton filling reserve roles. That leaves one spot, either for fifth-round guard Jordan Morgan or Grasu. The Bears could try to stash Morgan, who played his college ball at Division-II Kutztown, on the practice squad and keep Grasu. But Grasu doesn’t have flexibility to play another position besides center, which could hurt his case.