15 on 6: Urlacher proves his greatness

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15 on 6: Urlacher proves his greatness

Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010
6:33 PM

By Jim Miller
CSNChicago.com

I remember when the Bears selected what scouts and analysts dubbed "an extremely athletic safety" out of New Mexico.

Everyone thought he was too big to excel at safety in the NFL and would be converted to linebacker. Head coach Dick Jauron did just that immediately declaring strong side linebacker may be Brian Urlacher's ideal spot.

I also remember guys on the team somewhat frustrated that our first round draft pick was going to be a project.

When he arrived, we all saw the athleticism, but we also saw tight ends shredding him at the line of scrimmage in minicamps and through training camp. It was all new to Urlacher as he had not experienced being in the box face up against a tight end. It wasn't just the release techniques of tight ends Brian struggled to adapt to early, it was fullback iso's and releases, wide receivers crack blocking or guards pulling to kick out block. Urlacher kept plugging along but ultimately lost a hard fought training camp to Roosevelt Colvin for the starting job.

Since that time I have witnessed him fill the "A" gap on a playaction iso fake and still get to 15 yards depth in coverage to break up the pass to a tight end on a middle read. Brian stays vertical or attacks middle.

It wasn't long before injuries started to deplete the depth at linebacker. Barry Minter was a team leader, good player and our starting MLB, but went down with injury forcing Jauron and the coaching staff to throw the young buck in there. His true position had been found by accident.

Urlacher was amazing to watch while as he was out there simply reacting and flying to the football. I remember defensive coaches and teammates coming out of the defensive meetings buzzing about what Urlacher was putting on tape.

I was even more impressed competing against him following his initial training camp, but now as our starting MLB. He and I would mess with each other, each winning our individual battles, then letting each other know about it. He was now confident and becoming a true stud at his position in the NFL.

All of the success has never has gone to his head because he has always respected the game too much.

It is now time to pay him our respects as the bears all-time leading tackler. He is truly one of the greats who has changed the game - the mold of MLB - and is headed for Canton.

Just for the record, he could of done it as a safety too!

Jim Miller, an 11-year former NFL quarterback, is a Comcast SportsNet Bears analyst who can be seen each week on U.S. Cellular Bears Postgame Live. Miller, who spent five seasons with the Bears, analyzes current Chicago QB Jay Cutler in his "15 on 6" blog on CSNChicago.com and can be followed on Twitter @15miller.

Bears announce training camp schedule

Bears announce training camp schedule

The Bears released their official training camp schedule Thursday morning. After reporting to Olivet Nazarene on Wednesday, July 26, the first of ten practices open to the public will take place the following day. The Bears will be based out of Bourbonnais for the 16th straight season. Training camp will go through Sunday, Aug. 13 before the Bears break camp and finish the preseason in Lake Forest. 

All practices are tentatively scheduled to start at various times during the 11 a.m. hour with the exception of Saturday, Aug. 13, which starts at 12:05 p.m. Those times are subject to change based on weather, and a varying set of schedules that John Fox and his coaching staff have set up, as they adjust to player and training staff preferences in hopes of reducing injuries. 

Also, new this season, fans wanting to attend practices must order free tickets in advance through the Bears website. Fans will not be allowed in without a ticket, and the first 1,000 fans each day will be given various souvenirs. The practice campus will be open to the public with tickets from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Here is the full training camp schedule:

After historically low turnover total in 2016, what can Bears do to get more takeaways?

After historically low turnover total in 2016, what can Bears do to get more takeaways?

Quintin Demps set a career high in interceptions last year by not doing anything different. And that’s the message he’s sending a defense that generated only 11 takeaways in 2016, tied for the lowest single-season total in NFL history. 

Demps went from picking off four passes in both 2013 with the Kansas City Chiefs and 2014 with the New York Giants to notching just one interception with the Houston Texans in 2015. In 2016, though, Demps intercepted six passes, broke up nine more and totaled 38 tackles. 

“Turnovers are like, it’s not something that you go get, it’s something you let come to you by doing your job first and then helping out,” Demps said. “And then you’d be surprised how they come to you by doing your job and being aware of when you can help somebody out. A lot of times when you get help is when you get picks and turnovers.”

The danger for a defense coming off a historically bad takeaway is sort of a whiplash effect, where there’s an over-emphasis on creating turnovers and not enough attention paid to, as Demps said, “doing your job.” There’s a fine line between being opportunistic and undisciplined.

“I tell my safeties all the time, we gotta tackle first,” Demps said. “Tackle first, don’t miss any tackles and then the picks are going to come. I promise you that.”

The Bears felt positively after signs of being more opportunistic as a defense during shorts-and-helmets practices in May and June, though if that was because of any real improvements or because the defense is usually ahead of the offense is hard to tell at this stage of the year. 

The offseason program was valuable for the Bears’ secondary in growing trust within a group that had — no pun intended — plenty of turnover after the 2016 season. The hope is that the offseason additions of Demps, Prince Amukamara, Marcus Cooper and Eddie Jackson will solidify the secondary and lead to something better than last year’s historically-low turnover total. 

“We’re still trying to build something, but the actual, real building happens in training camp because I think then you start to see the group start to get formed and yo know who’s going to go with the one’s, who’s going to go with the two’s, stuff like that,” Amukamara said. “So I think that starts to get formed. But I think with a lot of guys now, I think what that creates is competition and guys trying their hardest to make the team.”