Chicago Bears

Adams, Webb named Piccolo Award winners

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Adams, Webb named Piccolo Award winners

Tuesday, April 26, 2011
Posted: 11:10 a.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com
Tackle JMarcus Webb was the winner of the Bears prestigious Brian Piccolo Award, named for the former Bears running back and created in 1970 following death due to cancer on June 16 of that year.

Defensive tackle Anthony Adams, already the winner of the Bears Ed Block Courage Award this year, was honored Tuesday as the winner of the award for veterans. The veteran award was established in 1992 and first presented to Mike Singletary, who was retiring at the end of that season.

The winners are chosen by the players. This is the 41st anniversary of the award. Piccolo wore No. 41 when he played for the Bears from 1966-69

When an award is voted on by your teammates, it is special, said coach Lovie Smith.

Adams was a particular hit with one fan in attendance. Daddy, youre funny, son Anthony III piped up as Adams finished at the podium.

Coordinator Mike Martz presented the award to Webb, a seventh-round draft choice out of West Texas A&M. The odds of him making this team were pretty remarkable, Martz said. To accomplish what Webb did says a lot about JMarcus and the kind of many he is.

Webb was visibly moved by the moment. I stand here humbled by the Brian Piccolo Award, Webb said. He was a man who inspired people from all walks of life with his dedication... Im not sure Ill be able to measure up to such a man but I will seek to inspire others with my hard work and dedication.

Adams epitomizes the term and concept of teammate, said defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli in presenting Adams.

I just appreciate everybody, on down to the training staff that kept us on the field, Adams said. Its definitely a great honor and it was definitely a great experience this year, being one game away from the Super Bowl...

Im sorry to be talking about Green Bay but I hate having this bad taste in my mouth.

Following Piccolos death, the Brian Piccolo Cancer Research Fund was established and proceeds sent to the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York for research on embryonal cell carcinoma. The disease that was 100 percent fatal at the time of Piccolos death had the rate reduced to 50 percent today.

The late Ed McCaskey played a prominent role in helping Piccolo through his illness and in the work against cancer after Piccolos death. The Fund has since turned its work to breast cancer research and raised more than 8 million since 1991.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears edition of 'Who he look like?'

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USA TODAY

Bears edition of 'Who he look like?'

Who says football can't be fun?

Per wide receiver Markus Wheaton's Instagram account, the Bears had quite a bit of fun playing the "Who he look like?" game on Wednesday: 

No mercy on the new guys as Roberto Aguayo was compared to Pedro from "Napoleon Dynamite." Are "Vote for Roberto" T-shirts next? 

Even the most respected veterans don't have a free pass as Kyle Long apparently looks like Marcin Gortat. 

This could be the best one, though. Kevin White as Kel from "Good Burger." 

We'll order up a healthy season for White and many touchdowns. 

 

What you need to know from Bears practice: Kyle Long gets ankle checked out, expresses remorse for Monday fights

What you need to know from Bears practice: Kyle Long gets ankle checked out, expresses remorse for Monday fights

Coach John Fox said Kyle Long expressed “remorse” and was “embarrassed” after being kicked out of Monday’s final training camp practice in Bourbonnais for sparking a pair of skirmishes with teammates.

Long hasn’t been available to the media since his pair of physical outbursts on Monday, and wasn’t at practice Wednesday. Fox said Long was at a doctor’s appointment to get his surgically-repaired ankle checked out, but is expected to be back at practice on Thursday.

Long’s father, NFL on Fox analyst Howie Long, addressed his son’s practice ejection on the Rich Eisen Show on Tuesday.

“He’s gotta get it under control,” Long said. “It’s one of those things where you’re coming back from injury and you’re switching positions, maybe you’re not where you want to be right now.”

Fox said “everything’s fine” with Long after talking with him, and understood where he could be frustrated by slowly being eased back into full team activities during practice (and possibly not playing in any preseason games).

“I think any time a player's injured, they get something that they love taken away from them,” Fox said. “It's been a minute, there's some pain and suffering that goes along with it and I'm sure those are things. But we have a lot of resources here, Kyle knows he's loved here, by his teammates and by everyone in the building. He'll get through it and we talked about that and I think he feels confident in that.”

From the sick bay

Cornerback Prince Amukamara didn’t participate in practice Wednesday due to a strained hamstring and is day-to-day, Fox said. Wide receiver Markus Wheaton had surgery on his fractured pinkie, too, Fox said.

There was some good news for the Bears on Wednesday, though, with Jeremy Langford and Mark Sanchez both participating in practice. Langford isn’t quite back to full health after spraining his ankle during a walkthrough in July, but sounded confident he can get back to that level.

“I think my main thing is getting back to 100 percent and being the player that I am and can be, and the rest will take care of itself,” Langford said.