Bears grades: Forte, Hester receive highest mark

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Bears grades: Forte, Hester receive highest mark

Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011
Posted: 5:45 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com Bears Insider Follow @CSNMoonMullin
The Cam Newton Experience was overshadowed by a Bears game plan that featured 18 pass plays and 30 runs by backs. The Bears failed to pick up at least one first down on only two of 10 possessions and made the most out of possessions in a game that saw the defense and special teams each score touchdowns and send the Carolina offense back onto the field.
QUARTERBACK: B-

The numbers arent the whole story. Jay Cutler was a game manager. Period. He was asked to throw just 18 passes (17 he got off, plus one sack). He completed a pedestrian nine passes for 102 yards, second-lowest of his career for a full game and his rating of 46.7 was the lowest in his career for a victory. Cutler threw too high to reserve tight end Kyle Adams in the fourth quarter and was intercepted in the Chicago end of the field. But Cutler handled occasional pressure well and controlled the game for his offense.
RUNNING BACKS: A

Matt Forte ran for 205 yards, a career high, on 25 carries and caught four of five passes thrown to him for another 23 and was handed the ball as many times in the first half nine as he was during the entire Green Bay game and one short of his carry total against New Orleans. Forte responded with 94 yards and a TD. Forte made this a statement game for elite status and now has had 158 or more total yards in three of four games this year and his rushing touchdown was the Bears first this season.

Marion Barber was a welcome addition to the backfield, giving Forte relief in the first quarter with a first-down burst and putting the game out of reach with a 3-yard touchdown run late in the fourth quarter.

Forte also provided support for Cutler in pass protection, contributing with several blitz pickups and support on double-teams where needed. Fullback Tyler Clutts did not touch the ball but was effective as a lead blocker.
RECEIVERS: B-

The offense only threw the ball four times in the first half but Dane Sanzenbacher and Roy Williams converted catches into first downs. Sanzenbacher had a drop on a third-down but the receivers delivered downfield blocking that occupied defensive backs and helped extend Forte runs.

Forte had five runs of longer than 10 yards; four of them 17 or longer. Those do not happen without receivers and tight ends making blocks downfield.
OFFENSIVE LINE: A

Frank Omiyale did a respectable job early, sealing the right side for Fortes 45-yard run in the first quarter. Chris Williams cleared the way for Fortes 17-yard TD jaunt in the second quarter, aided by effective back-side protection from center Roberto Garza. Chris Spencer started again for Lance Louis at RG but went out in the first quarter with a hand injury and Louis came on and played well, possibly winning his starting job back.

But Omiyale gave up a first-down sack in the second quarter and did not play well going into halftime, and Garza was flagged a play later for being downfield too soon. Spencer returned to start the second half and Omiyale was benched with Louis moving out to right tackle, a position he had never played previously.

Louis played three different positions right guard, right tackle, tight end. The line gave Cutler adequate protection and was the key to Fortes 205 rushing yards.
COACHING: A

The Bears set up their passing game with throw-back football, running the ball on all eight plays of their opening drive and two out of three on their second. The game plan extended to running the ball on 13 of the first 14 plays and resisted the Mike Martz inclination to throw even though the Carolina pass defense has been one of the NFLs worst at allowing yardage and was without starting cornerback Chris Gamble.

More impressive perhaps, players talked afterwards about the adjustments coaches were making between each series to counteract Carolina scheming and also to maximize what they knew they would be able to do against the Panthers.

Newton played up to his reputation and stats, putting 543 total yards and 29 points on the Bears in their own house. It was a game the defense will take but cannot afford to repeat as a punt return and interception return saved the Bears, who gave up 10 plays of 20 yards or longer.

DEFENSIVE LINE: F

The front got barely any pressure on Newton and too often lost containment both of Newton and Carolina running backs Jonathan Stewart and DeAngelo Williams. Carolina backs averaged 7.4 yards per carry and too often were getting to the second level, while Newton was rarely hurried and never sacked.
LINEBACKERS: D-

Lance Briggs and Brian Urlacher each were credited initially with eight tackles and each made solid individual stops at crucial points. Their combination hit on Legedu Naanee resulted in a tipped ball that was grabbed and returned for a TD by D.J. Moore. Briggs provided some blitz pressure but backs were too frequently getting shoulders turned before linebackers were able to fill run gaps.

SECONDARY: D

Moore's interception return was one of the few big plays by the secondary. The defensive backs were embarrassed for 374 passing yards and 9 plays of 20 yards or longer by a rookie quarterback and receivers who clearly were ramped up to stick it to the Bears. Brandon Meriweather was burned by Steve Smith in deep coverage as Smith finished with 181 yards on eight catches. The Bears limited the receivers to a late TD by ex-Bear Greg Olsen but too many times were beaten for big plays.

SPECIAL TEAMS: A

Devin Hester exploded a 73-yard KOR from nine yards deep in the end zone with excellent blocking to set up the Bears second TD. He topped that with 69-yard punt return for a touchdown to set an NFL record of 11 punt returns for touchdowns.

Julius Peppers blocked a short third-quarter field goal try by Olindo Mare. But Zackary Bowman cost the Bears field position by failing to locate the ball on a fourth-quarter punt that went for a touchback instead of giving Carolina the ball inside its 10.

Hester, Johnny Knox and Kahlil Bell returned three kickoffs an average of 31.3 yards, Knoxs one for 32 yards and Bell 20.

Adam Podlesh punted for a modest 39.3 average but dropped two of four inside the 20 and another for a touchback. Robbie Gould converted from 20 and 24 yards in his only two attempts.

COACHING: B

For the second straight week the Bears appeared ill-prepared for the intensity of an opponents opening drive. The defense rallied after a coverage breakdown on Carolinas second possession but rarely stopped the Panthers all afternoon. The decision was made not to spy Newton but the lack of pressure called for some adjustment somewhere to cut down on his time to throw.

Special teams preparation gave Hester decision-making authority on kickoff returns, the reason he brought one out from deep in the end zone.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information

Kyle Fuller heads to injured reserve as Bears make other roster moves

Kyle Fuller heads to injured reserve as Bears make other roster moves

The upheaval that has afflicted the 2016 Bears roster ratcheted up a notch late Tuesday when the Bears placed cornerback Kyle Fuller on injured reserve due to a knee injury and shuffled the depth chart elsewhere.

The Bears waived tight end Greg Scruggs, who was making the switch to offense from the defensive line, and linebacker Jonathan Anderson, while moving linebacker John Timu from the practice squad to the 53-man roster. To fortify the defensive line, where nose tackle Eddie Goldman is down indefinitely with an ankle injury, the Bears signed CJ Wilson, a 2010 draft pick of the Green Bay Packers who has played for the Packers, Oakland Raiders and Detroit Lions, starting 19 of 78 career games played.

Fuller, the 14th-overall pick of the 2014 draft and once identified as a building block of the Bears defense, underwent knee surgery Aug. 15 while the team went to New England for practices and a preseason game with the Patriots. He had been making significant strides in recovery as far as straight-ahead running but was still hampered with change-of-direction.

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Coach John Fox on Monday said simply that Fuller “has a sore knee. It has some medical things that kind of restrict you. When we get that healed up, he’ll go.”

The IR designation does not necessarily end Fuller’s season. Beginning in 2013, under an agreement between the NFL and Players Association, one player per team may be placed on injured reserve and later be brought back to the active roster. That player must sit out six weeks and cannot be activated for an additional two weeks.

With inside linebacker Danny Trevathan out following surgery on his thumb, Anderson had been expected to see additional playing time, possibly with the No. 1 unit. But rookie Nick Kwiatkoski started Sunday at Dallas in the base 3-4 and Christian Jones cycled in with sub packages.

Three starting points for the Bears to salvage their 2016 season

Three starting points for the Bears to salvage their 2016 season

As the noted philosopher once intoned, the past is for cowards and losers. Applied to the 2016 Bears, the latter already applies, though not wanting to look at the recent past shouldn’t be taken as evidence of cowardice, just not wanting to revisit pain.

Looking to the future is the obvious only option for an 0-3 football team.

“You’ve just got to go into every week like it’s a new week,” said linebacker Jerrell Freeman, one of the few encouraging parts of an injury-speckled defense, whose 34 tackles are approaching twice those of No. 2 Jacoby Glenn (19), with four tackles for loss vs. no one else with more than two.

“Every week is a new season regardless of whether you’re winning or losing. You can’t look back, you always have to look forward. Because if not, you won’t give the next team the respect they deserve and have another bad result.”

But the fan base can be excused for expecting a next bad result simply because the Bears have given zero indications that the future will be any better than the immediate past.

That is the signal concern: Who turns this around or, for that matter, even slows the rate of descent?

No Bears team has made the playoffs in a season that began with three straight losses. The 1932 team was winless in its first three, but those at least were scoreless ties. So postseason isn’t a relevant concept anymore except possibly as some sort of punchline.

But one vintage NFL axiom is that things from a game are seldom as bad upon later review than you thought they were at the time (they’re also never as good, either, but good hasn’t shown up yet). And turnarounds do happen.

But those do have to start somewhere. Any Bears season course correction for 2016 has three possible starting points:

A defensive 'village'

The Bears do not have elite talent on defense, meaning that the solution can come only from a marshaling of forces that makes the whole greater than the sum of the parts.

John Fox teams are built on defense, and consensus had the Bears as potentially a top-10 defense before the successive miseries vs. Houston, Philadelphia and Dallas. The Bears have zero defensive star power at this point, which is a problem, by way of understatement.

Fox’s 2011 Denver team started 1-4, then reversed itself and made the playoffs at 8-8 with Tim Tebow as quarterback. (It also had Marion Barber stepping out of bounds and later fumbling away the Bears game, but never mind that for now.) But that team had Elvis Dumervil and a rookie Von Miller combining for 21 sacks. The Bears have a total of four sacks, and players representing 1.5 of those (Eddie Goldman, Danny Trevathan) are out indefinitely with injuries.

But linebacker Willie Young cut to the chase: “We have to control the running game before we can have fun in the backfield,” he said after the debacle in Dallas with the Cowboys rushing for 200 yards. “I don’t know what was going on. All I could do is ask the guys to give me all you got. One play at a time, just give me all you’ve got.”

That would be a place to start.

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Remember the 'Run and Shoop' offense?

John Shoop might have been the object of ridicule as Bears offensive coordinator. But when he took over after the defection of Gary Crowton to coach BYU, the Bears won two of their last three by running to the point of tackle James “Big Cat” Williams, nicknaming the offense the “Run and Shoop” offense. The linemen loved it initially because Shoop simply loaded up and ran the football and, most important, stayed with the plan.

The point is not to become plodding, which Shoop’s offense ultimately became. But the Bears abandoned the run at Dallas when they trailed 24-3 at halftime, even though they had the ball to start the third quarter and with one defensive stop after a touchdown could have been working to get within one score.

“It could have flipped quickly,” guard Kyle Long said. “One drive, it turns into a seven-point game, and that’s the NFL.”

The need for the Bears to run the football isn’t really worth spending time on. Obvious. The offensive line was built for running the football. But for various reasons coordinator Dowell Loggains has not had success with what was supposed to be the foundation of the offense. The Bears cannot win by being a pass-based team, regardless of whether Jay Cutler or Brian Hoyer or Matt Barkley is doing the throwing.

The Bears will not be blowing out many, if any, teams. Their best option is to wear opponents down in first halves, live with Jordan Howard/Joique Bell/whomever netting 50 to 60 yards in a first half, then turning the two- to three-yard runs of the first half into four- to six-yarders in the second.

Shoop would like that.

Get one win

Playoff chances mean nothing. How good or bad the Bears are means nothing. All that matters is winning, not games, but one game. The next game. As Fox and other players have said, the Bears have not put together one complete game yet. That is not going to happen automatically, but one play, one quarter, one half at a time.

And they know it. “You want to win games,” Freeman said. “There’s no panic. There’s a sense of urgency, that’s for sure. We’ve got to put out this fire and put it out quick, like yesterday or the day before.”