Briggs a difference-maker this time vs. Seahawks?

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Briggs a difference-maker this time vs. Seahawks?

Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2011
8:58 AM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

The Bears have had to listen all year to critics who pointed to one lucky break after another giving the Bears games, and wins, against teams missing elite players. While no one seemed to be noticing, the Bears occasionally were on the wrong side of injury luck.

Matt Hasselbeck noticed. The Seattle quarterback had the good fortune of facing the Bears without perhaps their best single defensive player at the time.

Linebacker Lance Briggs was out with an ankle injury and Hasselbeck is of the opinion that Briggs absence took something away from the accomplishment of beating the Bears in Soldier Field.

Hes arguably one of the best defensive players in the game, Hasselbeck said. Going into that game, we fully expected him to play. He didnt play, and that was a big deal.

So for us to sit back and say, Oh, hey, we beat them at their place. We can do it again, that would be a dangerous way to feel. Because Lance Briggs did not play in that game. He is a big, big-time difference-maker and a great football player. As hard as this game was going to be the fact that hes back up, that takes it to a whole other level, Hasselbeck said.

Mike-minded

Zackary Bowman, Tim Jennings and Charles Tillman didnt leave the practice field Monday with the rest of their teammates. The three cornerbacks went off to a corner of the field and worked against each other.

Only they werent working against each other. They were working against Mike Williams, the one-time bust as a 10th-overall pick of the Detroit Lions in 2005 who did so little in three seasons that he was out of football for the 2008-09 seasons. It was Williams who had a career game against the Bears back in October with 10 receptions for 123 yards

Hes not the same guy as he once was, Jennings said. You can tell. Hes in shape, hes learned how to run routes a little better and you can tell hes been working on stuff outside football when he wasnt in football. Hes more committed to the team, working hard and hes gotten better in certain areas.

Hes huge. Hes gotten better.

The Bears played their cornerbacks on their respective sides rather than assign one to match up exclusively with Williams. His size (6-5, 230) makes Tillman the logical assignment but the Williams had just 55 catches in the other 15 games this season and may not warrant jury rigging the defense to stop him specifically.

We have to play a lot better against him, and we do plan, said coach Lovie Smith. Its like that each week. If you dont have success, you look for a better way of doing things. Maybe a better way is just to play what we had planned in a little bit better. Show up Sunday and youll see.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears, Lions have been totally different teams in fourth quarters

Bears, Lions have been totally different teams in fourth quarters

Apart from any specific player or statistic, one unavoidable part of Sunday’s game against the Detroit Lions looms ominously in front of the Bears, and there is no way they can avoid it: The fourth quarter.

Every game has one, and it has been the blessing of the Lions’ 2016 existence and the bane of the Bears’. The Bears talk constantly about the importance of playing a 60-minute game.

Before last Sunday’s 28-13 win over the New Orleans Saints, the Lions had trailed in the fourth quarter of all seven of their previous victories this season. A team that had traditionally found undisciplined ways to squander games has been finding ways to win them, according to a formula.

As Detroit Free Press columnist Jeff Seidel noted, “every single one of these games has looked the same: There was the drive, the field goal and the huge defensive play or, at least, some variation of those things."

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This is particularly relevant — and concerning — for the Bears, who have been the virtual opposite: Three times this season (at Houston, at Indianapolis, vs. Jacksonville) they have led in fourth quarters and lost those games.

The reasons lie in different phases, not simply cases of one, same unit failing.

"With us it’s not excuses, but we’re young, on our third quarterback, and that can affect it as far as experience and just being in that situation,” said coach John Fox. “To close the game, sometimes it’s just a mindset. When you have young players, it’s learning how to deal with adversity and learning how to deal with prosperity.”

The Bears did not outscore an opponent in the fourth quarter of any of their first 10 games this season, finally getting something going late in the Tennessee and San Francisco games, outscoring those two opponents by a combined 19-3.

“Being able to finish games, that’s something we’re learning and I think I saw examples of it last week in the San Francisco game and even going back to Minnesota, games where we have closed it, even in the first Detroit game, although we made that one interesting,” Fox said. “We found a way. So a lot of it’s experience under pressure and hopefully we’re figuring it out and can figure it out the last four games of the year.”

Beginning Sunday, presumably, against the NFL’s reigning comeback team.

Brandon Marshall doesn't remember 3 TD game from Bears-49ers in 2014 because he was on pain pills

Brandon Marshall doesn't remember 3 TD game from Bears-49ers in 2014 because he was on pain pills

Remember back in 2014 when the Bears rallied from a 14-point deficit in the fourth quarter to beat the 49ers 28-20 in San Francisco on Sunday Night Football?

Well, Brandon Marshall doesn't.

And he had three of the four touchdown catches, two of them coming in the last quarter.

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The former Bears wide receiver, who had been dealing with a high ankle sprain, said he took pain pills before the game and doesn't recall much of it, including the incredible one-handed grab that went viral.

"I don't really remember much about that game because I worked really hard to get back from a high ankle (sprain)," Marshall said during a conference call Wednesday. "I'll say it, I took a couple pain pills that masked the pain. I really wasn't supposed to play. I came back from a high ankle (sprain) within 10 days. I was supposed to be out four to six weeks. I don't remember much from that game. I just remember catching those balls. And that was pretty much it."

If only Bears fans could forget that season entirely, which ended in a 5-11 record and the end of the Marc Trestman era.