Could Clemson DE Bowers slip to Bears at 29?

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Could Clemson DE Bowers slip to Bears at 29?

Thursday, April 7, 2011
Posted: 2:43 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

DaQuan Bowers is having one of the more intriguing pre-draft rides of any prospect. The Clemson defensive end has been everywhere from the No. 1 overall pick to a second-rounder, based on a suspect knee and just one mega-year (15.5 sacks as a junior, 4 total his first two seasons).

Pro Football Weekly draft analyst Nolan Nawrocki summarized the concerns very succinctly this week and it would not surprise Nolan to see Bowers sliding down as far as 29th, where the Bears live.

The fluctuations will stop in three weeks when Bowers is drafted, undoubtedly somewhere between the two previous extremes. But two Bears defensive ends have figured in his being where he is and will be.

One was the late Gaines Adams, who was like a big brother to me, Bowers said. We were very close. Hes one of the reasons I chose Clemson. I was hit real hard by his death, but I had to go on.

The other is Julius Peppers. Bowers has held Peppers up as a football model for himself, but with realistic limits. He is one of the premier defensive ends in the NFL, Bowers said, laughing, and I am just a scrawny little defensive end coming out of college attempting to play like him and be half as good as him.

The Bears are determined to upgrade their pass rush (rare is the season and team that doesnt annually list that as a priority) and some scenarios would have Bowers still around when the Bears turn comes at No. 29. If hes available, he becomes an interesting possibility, particularly because that could mean at least one team has presumably taken an offensive lineman ahead of them rather than Bowers.

Theres talk of talk

NFL players have sent a letter to U.S. District Court Judge Susan Nelson, who is handling the court action by players seeking an injunction to end the lockout. The gist is that the players are embracing her recommendations to participate in mediation under court oversight.

View from the Moon will refrain from lengthy discussion and description of the myriad details here and elsewhere in the process. But there are a couple of different mediation options and the owners arent expected to be in favor of this one. So its movement, sort of...

Grain-of-salt time is upon us

Florida CG Mike Pouncey tweeted (@MikePouncey) that he would be shocked if hes not in a Dallas Cowboys uniform next season, obviously based on the hugs he got while visiting there. Actually, if he is in a Dallas uniform, a pretty high percentage of the football world will be dealing with the shock. The Cowboys pick No. 9 and no draft preview has Pouncey going nearly that high.

Pouncey can be forgiven, though, for letting himself believe the platitudes of a visit. The Bears have lavished the same things on prospects; so have other teams. Thats just part of pre-draft visits. As Mike Florio notes at ProFootballTalk.com, Randy Moss once had that same impression from the Cowboys, prior to the 1998 draft, when Dallas was picking eighth. They didnt take Moss, who stayed around until No. 21 when Dennis Green and the Minnesota Vikings took him.

For what its worth, Pouncey at guard while brother Maurkice was at center, before going on to a Pro Bowl rookie season with the Pittsburgh Steelers rates at the top of at least one list.

LSU defensive tackle Drake Nevis, a keep-an-eye-on player for the Bears according to draft expert Wes Bunting at National Football Post, said Maurkice was the best single blocker Nevis faced in college and Mike is good, too, Nevis said, adding, When they were at guard and center, that was a tough batch. And a lot of people would say that was the best one-two tandem they ever faced.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Want to be in on Bears QB deliberations? 'Look at the film'

Want to be in on Bears QB deliberations? 'Look at the film'

Back in 1992 the Dallas Cowboys were in draft deliberations around the No. 17 spot of the first round, looking for upgrades on defense. A scout made a suggestion that they target Ohio State defensive end Alonzo Spellman, one of the most physically imposing (6-4, 280 pounds) players and best athletes in that draft.
 
Coach Jimmy Johnson responded, "Tell me about the production."
 
Came back the answer: Three years at OSU, nine total sacks.
 
"Oh, please!" Johnson scoffed, calling in cornerback Kevin Smith and leaving Spellman to the Bears at No. 22. Spellman had several respectable seasons but never more than 8.5 sacks in nine NFL seasons.
 
As investment advisers counsel, past performance is not necessarily a predictor of future results. But past performance can be, and an axiom in NFL personnel rooms is, look at the film.
 
CSNChicago.com is doing that as the NFL Scouting Combine approaches (Feb. 29) along with free agency and the start of the league year and its trading window. It becomes an increasingly relevant exercise to look at the intricacies behind some of the key players and positions the Bears will be addressing through the upcoming weeks. CSNChicago.com previously looked at the need to evaluate quarterbacks from the intangible standpoints first, then the measurables.
 
Using Jay Cutler as an object lesson for how immense physical skills have questionable correlations to immense NFL performance, a look at one aspect of quarterback "film" warrants more attention than the measurables that command a disproportionate share of attention and scrutiny.
 
Ball security.
 
It has been Cutler's single biggest issue through his eight Bears seasons, was a reason why coaches once wanted to stay with Josh McCown instead of returning to Cutler following a Cutler injury absence, and why Brian Hoyer played his way into prominence in the discussion of 2017 Bears plans. Adam Gase went from offensive coordinator to hottest head-coach prospect in no small measure because he managed Cutler into better ball security.

[SHOP: Get your Bears gear right here]
 
But the point here is less Cutler – expected to be traded or released within the near future – than the level of ball security in the available options beyond Hoyer.
 
So, look at the film:
 
The widespread drooling over a possible trade with New England for Jimmy Garoppolo. The best thing in Garoppolo's favor is that he has been a Patriots backup to Tom Brady. Garoppolo, drawing distant comparisons to a Matt Flynn, Matt Cassel and other past experience-lite quarterback options, has thrown 94 NFL passes without an interception, which is impressive until matched against Hoyer's 200 last season without an interception, for comparison purposes.
 
But evaluating Garoppolo against the coming chief draft competition – DeShone Kizer, Mitch Trubisky, Deshaun Watson – suggests comparing apples to apples, meaning college ball security, since that's all the kids have to this point.
 
Garoppolo vaulted up draft boards (to New England's second round) on the strength of an Eastern Illinois senior season with 53 touchdown passes vs. nine interceptions, against chiefly FCS opposition. But in his first three seasons Garoppolo threw for 65 touchdowns and was intercepted 42 times.
 
Kizer? In his two Notre Dame seasons, 47 touchdowns, 19 interceptions.
 
Trubisky? 30 touchdowns last season, six interceptions. Including his two years as a North Carolina backup, 41 touchdowns, 10 interceptions.
 
Watson? 90 touchdowns, 32 interceptions in three Clemson seasons, the last two as Tigers starter.
 
Observations:
 
Garoppolo put in four college seasons, but has a little of the Trubisky/Flynn/Cassel, one-year-wonder feel. 
 
Kizer and Watson have more starting seasons, but the Watson intangible of getting his team to two national-championship games speaks to another level of "intangible."
 
GM Ryan Pace will incorporate heavy input from coach John Fox and coordinator Dowell Loggains. Coaches love ball security. Garoppolo? Watson? Trubisky? Kizer?
 
Look at the film.

BearsTalk Podcast: The risk and reward for Bears in trading for Jimmy Garoppolo

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USA TODAY

BearsTalk Podcast: The risk and reward for Bears in trading for Jimmy Garoppolo

In this edition of the BearsTalk podcast, CSN's Chris Boden, Sun-Times Bears beat writer Patrick Finley, and CSNChicago.com's Scott Krinch discuss the Bears' approach to the two-week window opening to franchise-tag Alshon Jeffery again, the risk/reward in trading for Jimmy Garoppolo or drafting a QB (and how high to draft one), Scott's 2.0 mock draft, plus the workers' compensation controversy the team found itself in last week and the club's decision to raise ticket prices.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below: