Ex-Bear Anderson knew who not to hit

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Ex-Bear Anderson knew who not to hit

Mark Anderson landed in the NFL with a splash: runner-up in defensive rookie of the year voting after 12 sacks in just situation duty as a pass rusher.

When he got to the New England Patriots, he understood why he was there: to tackle quarterbacks. All but one.

If I touched Tom Brady I would be out of there the next day, Anderson said, laughing. I never hit him. But when I came here, kind of like in my rookie year, I wanted to show the team what I could do. I love the system. Its fun right now.

It was definitely fun for Anderson again in 2011 as he signed with New England last Aug. 5 and tied for the team high with 10 sacks. Actually it was more than fun; it was a career rebirth after he had gone from his lofty rookie results (including a Super Bowl trip) to being handed Alex Browns starting job to being cut as his production declined to miniscule.

After the Bears released Anderson in 2010, he had a brief stop with the Houston Texans. Not a high point, more like a stopover, he said.

Then New England called and didnt have to ask twice, particularly with the impression Bill Belichicks made on Anderson. Call it a touch of awe.

He knows everything, Anderson said, shaking his head. He knows about players from other teams. He knows about backups on other teams. He knows weaknesses and tendencies. You have to admire a guy like that. He knew my strengths and weaknesses before I joined the team.

Things did not end well in Chicago for Anderson, although there is no rancor or bitterness in his tone, only a little sadness, as he recalls times there. He still stays in touch with former teammates Anthony Adams, Adewale Ogunleye and Tommie Harris and still holds coach Lovie Smith in the highest possible regard.

Coach Smith and coach Belichick are similar in that they are both players coaches, Anderson said. They know when it is time to work and they know when it is time to rest your guys...

Chicago was a good experience because I learned a lot. I learned what to do and what not to do. I learned how to approach certain situations. I used what I learned in Chicago and Houston to help me when I came here. It has worked out for me.

2017 NFL Draft Profile: California QB Davis Webb

2017 NFL Draft Profile: California QB Davis Webb

As part of our coverage leading up to the 2017 NFL Draft we will provide profiles of more than 100 prospects, including a scouting report and video interviews with each player.

Davis Webb, QB, California

6'5" | 229 lbs.

2016 stats:

4,295 YDS, 61.6 CMP%, 37 TD, 12 INT, 135.6 QBR

Projection:

Day 3

Scouting Report:

"System quarterback with more than 65 percent of his attempts coming inside of 10 yards. Webb has enough raw talent to be considered a developmental prospect, but his decision-making and accuracy issues beyond 10 yards is a big red flag that might be tough to overcome in the NFL." — Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Video analysis provided by Rotoworld and NBC Sports NFL Draft expert Josh Norris.

Click here for more NFL Draft Profiles

Owners to consider on and off field changes this week during NFL meetings

Owners to consider on and off field changes this week during NFL meetings

Give the NFL credit for, at least this one time, genuinely putting the interests of its fans first. Or at least proposing to.

Among the matters expected to come before this week’s owners meetings in Arizona will be one from Washington that coaches have the ability to make unlimited replay challenges as long as the ones they make are correct. The idea is not likely to pass, in part because the NFL is endeavoring to improve the pace of its games, particularly for fans seated in stadiums, particularly outdoor ones. (If you’re watching at home, replay reviews are enough time to fill the chips bowl and grab a cold one.)

Along that line, the plan is for tablet computers to be run out to game officials for their review and consultation, while the final decision is reached at league officiating headquarters in New York, according to current proposals to be considered for votes this week. Additionally, a 40-second play clock is suggested after extra points when there is no commercial break scheduled, and halftime to be limited to 13 minutes 30 seconds.

[VIVID SEATS: Get your Bears tickets right here!]

Actual in-game changes are also under consideration.

No one is likely to label it “The McClellin Rule” but a proposal is there to ban players leaping over offensive linemen (read: long snappers) to block field goals and extra points. Former Bears linebacker Shea, as a special-teams rusher with the New England Patriots, successfully vaulted Ravens blockers to knock down a Baltimore field goal try last season.

The proposal is likely to pass ostensibly as a player-safety measure, although cynics might suggest that the impetus behind the ban is general irritation that Bill Belichick’s group came up with with kick-block gambit.

More directly aimed at protecting players from gratuitous violence in a game that has enough violence just by its nature is a move to remind officials that players can be ejected for egregiously illegal hits. The situation is not considered dire because of frequency but the league clearly wants to send a message/reminder to not only officials, but players, something likely to be reinforced during officials’ tours of training camps in August.