Jets' Sanchez hurting, lacking respect from Bears

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Jets' Sanchez hurting, lacking respect from Bears

Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010
5:47 PM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez is struggling with a shoulder injury. Hes also struggling to get some real respect from the team hes about to face, shoulder permitting.

Linebacker Brian Urlacher had to search for thoughts on Sanchez, settling on, Um. Theyre a running football team. How about that? They try to be physical and pound the ball, and get in some good third and short situations, if they can.

The first Sanchez asset that came to the mind of linebacker Lance Briggs: Hes a resilient guy.

And defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli, who last week lavished such praise on rookie Joe Webb that it was difficult not to suspect that someone had slipped a tape of Michael Vick into Marinellis projector, given Marinellis use of Vickian superlatives to describe Webb.

And Sanchez? I sense a really competitive spirit, Marinelli said. Hes got a real competitiveness about him.

Sanchez isnt even getting unqualified backing from his coach. Still struggling with a shoulder injury suffered in last weekends game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Sanchez was limited in practice for the second straight day. He said Wednesday that if the game were being played right then, he would have played.

Not so, according to his coach. Rex Ryan has dubbed Sanchezs status as a game-time decision. And if Sanchez cant go, the Bears will be looking at veteran Mark Brunell in his fourth different costume, after playing the Bears as a Packer, Jaguar and Redskin in seasons past.

Sanchez hasnt thrown a touchdown pass in his three December games, 106 throws without one of them winding up in the end zone.

Sanchez has had flashes of brilliance. He also has been the quarterback in the four Jets losses when they scored 9 (vs. Baltimore), 0 (vs. Green Bay), 3 (vs. New England) and 6 (vs. Miami) points.

In all three, four of those games we had opportunities in the red zone that we just didnt capitalize on, Sanchez explained. In all of them we had turnovers except for the Baltimore game. There just wasnt a good flow to our offense, a rhythm. Its clear when you watch film from those games, and then all the other games it looks like a totally different team.

A little traveling music, please

Theyve been in Bourbonnais since 2002 and the Bears will be there for training camp at Olivet Nazarene University through at least 2012, with an option for 2013. The venue lacks the hills and trees of Platteville but its also a place you can get to in a little over an hour and its in Illinois, so your travel dollars stay in-state.

Playing footsienot

Lance Briggs was not going to be drawn into any of the brouhaha swirling about the supposed video of Jets coach Rex Ryans wife and her feet.

No. Nuh uh, Briggs said, laughing. No. I stay away from feet, you know what I mean? Im in bad need of a pedicure right now, so I dont wish anyone near my feet.

Sick bay

Wide receiver Earl Bennett sat out his second day of practice with an ankle injury, increasing chances that tight end Desmond Clark will be active for the Jets game. Two of Clarks four active game days this season were when receivers (Bennett, Devin Aromashodu) were placed on the inactive list.

Linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa (knee) was limited in practice for the second day.

Safety Eric Smith (concussion) and tackle Damien Woody (knee) were held out of practice again.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Want to be in on Bears QB deliberations? 'Look at the film'

Want to be in on Bears QB deliberations? 'Look at the film'

Back in 1992 the Dallas Cowboys were in draft deliberations around the No. 17 spot of the first round, looking for upgrades on defense. A scout made a suggestion that they target Ohio State defensive end Alonzo Spellman, one of the most physically imposing (6-4, 280 pounds) players and best athletes in that draft.
 
Coach Jimmy Johnson responded, "Tell me about the production."
 
Came back the answer: Three years at OSU, nine total sacks.
 
"Oh, please!" Johnson scoffed, calling in cornerback Kevin Smith and leaving Spellman to the Bears at No. 22. Spellman had several respectable seasons but never more than 8.5 sacks in nine NFL seasons.
 
As investment advisers counsel, past performance is not necessarily a predictor of future results. But past performance can be, and an axiom in NFL personnel rooms is, look at the film.
 
CSNChicago.com is doing that as the NFL Scouting Combine approaches (Feb. 29) along with free agency and the start of the league year and its trading window. It becomes an increasingly relevant exercise to look at the intricacies behind some of the key players and positions the Bears will be addressing through the upcoming weeks. CSNChicago.com previously looked at the need to evaluate quarterbacks from the intangible standpoints first, then the measurables.
 
Using Jay Cutler as an object lesson for how immense physical skills have questionable correlations to immense NFL performance, a look at one aspect of quarterback "film" warrants more attention than the measurables that command a disproportionate share of attention and scrutiny.
 
Ball security.
 
It has been Cutler's single biggest issue through his eight Bears seasons, was a reason why coaches once wanted to stay with Josh McCown instead of returning to Cutler following a Cutler injury absence, and why Brian Hoyer played his way into prominence in the discussion of 2017 Bears plans. Adam Gase went from offensive coordinator to hottest head-coach prospect in no small measure because he managed Cutler into better ball security.

[SHOP: Get your Bears gear right here]
 
But the point here is less Cutler – expected to be traded or released within the near future – than the level of ball security in the available options beyond Hoyer.
 
So, look at the film:
 
The widespread drooling over a possible trade with New England for Jimmy Garoppolo. The best thing in Garoppolo's favor is that he has been a Patriots backup to Tom Brady. Garoppolo, drawing distant comparisons to a Matt Flynn, Matt Cassel and other past experience-lite quarterback options, has thrown 94 NFL passes without an interception, which is impressive until matched against Hoyer's 200 last season without an interception, for comparison purposes.
 
But evaluating Garoppolo against the coming chief draft competition – DeShone Kizer, Mitch Trubisky, Deshaun Watson – suggests comparing apples to apples, meaning college ball security, since that's all the kids have to this point.
 
Garoppolo vaulted up draft boards (to New England's second round) on the strength of an Eastern Illinois senior season with 53 touchdown passes vs. nine interceptions, against chiefly FCS opposition. But in his first three seasons Garoppolo threw for 65 touchdowns and was intercepted 42 times.
 
Kizer? In his two Notre Dame seasons, 47 touchdowns, 19 interceptions.
 
Trubisky? 30 touchdowns last season, six interceptions. Including his two years as a North Carolina backup, 41 touchdowns, 10 interceptions.
 
Watson? 90 touchdowns, 32 interceptions in three Clemson seasons, the last two as Tigers starter.
 
Observations:
 
Garoppolo put in four college seasons, but has a little of the Trubisky/Flynn/Cassel, one-year-wonder feel. 
 
Kizer and Watson have more starting seasons, but the Watson intangible of getting his team to two national-championship games speaks to another level of "intangible."
 
GM Ryan Pace will incorporate heavy input from coach John Fox and coordinator Dowell Loggains. Coaches love ball security. Garoppolo? Watson? Trubisky? Kizer?
 
Look at the film.

BearsTalk Podcast: The risk and reward for Bears in trading for Jimmy Garoppolo

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USA TODAY

BearsTalk Podcast: The risk and reward for Bears in trading for Jimmy Garoppolo

In this edition of the BearsTalk podcast, CSN's Chris Boden, Sun-Times Bears beat writer Patrick Finley, and CSNChicago.com's Scott Krinch discuss the Bears' approach to the two-week window opening to franchise-tag Alshon Jeffery again, the risk/reward in trading for Jimmy Garoppolo or drafting a QB (and how high to draft one), Scott's 2.0 mock draft, plus the workers' compensation controversy the team found itself in last week and the club's decision to raise ticket prices.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below: