Chicago Bears

At last: Something newsworthy re. Bears coach search?

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At last: Something newsworthy re. Bears coach search?

For much of the past week the flood of local news regarding individuals in the Bears coach-search process has been self-serving. The predictably glowing testimonials about each candidate and GM Phil Emery may be accurate insights but this sort of thing is not uncommonly motivated by media members eager to curry favor with the possible new coach or with Emery.

But ESPNs Adam Schefter put out something with a touch of objectivity Saturday when he spoke with two of the interviewed candidates, who told him they have never interviewed with anyone as prepared and detailed as Emery. Dane Noble over at SB Nation gives a good account of the situation.

Anonymous sources can be suspect, but in this case, because Adam doesnt name the candidates (which could be Tampa Bays Mike Sullivan, Atlantas Keith Armstrong, even Dave Toub or Marc Trestman), I give it more cred rather than less. No one is using the platform to make nice-nice with Emery.

Being thorough, detailed and prepared doesnt assure a winning result. Anybody whos gone into an exam stone-cold ready and come out with a C is nodding here. But unprepared and un-detailed could all but assure a whiff.

As I noted previously, Emerys 13-candidate (for now) guest list is in the tradition of Mark Hatleys preliminary search for Dave Wannstedts replacement in 1999.

More important, the process has not yet cost the Bears one of their prime candidates; they werent after Doug Marrone (Buffalo), Rob Chudzinski (Cleveland) or Andy Reid (Kansas City) and the other four teams coach-questing are on a pace not appreciably faster than the Bears.

The speed of their offensive-coordinator search in 2010 cost the Bears several top college coaches because the search was dragging within range of recruiting. The Bears settled on Mike Martz.

So far the Bears are not settling for anything.

Bears: Where does Kyle Fuller fit with Prince Amukamara back?

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USA TODAY

Bears: Where does Kyle Fuller fit with Prince Amukamara back?

Prince Amukamara (ankle) is expected to make his 2017 regular season debut against the Pittsburgh Steelers after being a full participant in practices Thursday and Friday (he wasn't listed on Friday's injury report). But that leads to the question: What does defensive coordinator Vic Fangio do with Kyle Fuller?

Fuller acquitted himself well in starts against the Atlanta Falcons — in which he helped limit Julio Jones to four catches on five targets — and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Bears signed Amukamara to start opposite Marcus Cooper, but Fuller has at least earned the opportunity to keep his job — or a job — on Sunday. 

And it's worth noting that both Fuller and Amukamara are in contract years, so both should be motivated to not lose playing time going forward. 

“I was pleased with the waay Kyle played overall,” Fangio said. “There's obviously some plays he'd like to do over and play them a little better, but overall I thought he did a good job. I like where he's at right now.”

Fangio didn’t play Fuller as a nickel corner in 2015. But if the Bears want to get their best defensive players on the field could Fuller force his way into a nickel role with Amukamara and Cooper as the outside guys? 

That’s an especially pertinent question given Pittsburgh’s explosive trio of receivers: Antonio Brown, Martavis Bryant and JuJu Smith-Schuster. 

“No matter where a receiver lines up, it’s not going to be a down to take off,” Amukamara said. “We’re always going to have to have our ‘A’ game.”

What Mitchell Trubisky learned in that pre-draft workout with Ben Roethlisberger

What Mitchell Trubisky learned in that pre-draft workout with Ben Roethlisberger

Ben Roethlisberger came away from his pre-draft workout with Mitchell Trubisky — the two share the same agent — impressed, an opinion which the longtime Pittsburgh Steelers detailed on Wednesday. The feeling was mutual for Trubisky. 

“Yeah, Big Ben’s awesome,” Trubisky said. “It was really special and really a privilege to learn from him. … “I’ve really looked up to him ever since he came out because he’s an Ohio guy as well. He came from Miami, Ohio. And it’s unique he was able to have success early on in his career and that’s what you try to duplicate as a quarterback coming into this league, and just how he carries himself, how competitive he is. I just try to take those things and hopefully add them into my own game as well.”

Roethlisberger — who went to high school in Findlay, Ohio, which is about two and a half hour west of Trubisky’s hometown of Mentor — won every game he started his rookie year and won his first of two Super Bowls a year later. Beyond his success quarterbacking the Steelers over these last 14 years, though, Trubisky felt he could learn something from how Roethlisberger has been a leader in Pittsburgh’s locker room. 

“(He) owns the locker room, no matter where you’re at,” Trubisky said. “I think it’s just the type of person you are. You’re competitive. You’re an alpha. You know how things are supposed to be done and you won’t settle for anything less than what has to be done. You’re settling for nothing less than excellence. That’s what he strives he for and, I mean, that’s what we’re all striving for.”

Eventually, the Bears expect Trubisky to command the locker room in the same fashion (he certainly has the self-belief and confidence to do so). And perhaps he'll have the same kind of trophy-driven success over a long period of time enjoyed by Roethlisberger, too. While Trubisky isn't in control of his career just yet, that was another lesson he took away from Roethlisberger.

"One of the big pieces of advice he gave me was really take control of your career," Trubisky said. "And I think that's kind of how he instills how he carries himself in the locker room, on the practice field, at the line of scrimmage. The play is going to go how he wants it and that's really how I want my career to go. Just exactly what you dream of, and take control and get everyone to buy into the same plan. I think that's how you create a winning culture -- really taking control, really taking ownership and hopefully that trickles down through the rest of the team."