Miller: Seattle presents "must win" scenario

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Miller: Seattle presents "must win" scenario

The Seattle Seahawks come to Chicago having wonfour out of their lastfive games.Granted two of those wins came against the lowly St. Louis Rams, but the Great Northwest seized on confidence sinceWeek 10by defeating the Baltimore Ravens 22-17.The Bears are the better team, but with continuing offensive issues along with added distractions, it will take a great deal of focus to get a victory this weekend.Normally the focus required to win occurs during the week of preparation. Unfortunately, the Bears lost that luxury when Sam Hurds alleged drug arrest unfolded mid-week. It is just another variable mentally and physically the Bears must deal with when facing the Seahawks.Releasing Hurd should have a positive impact in the locker room along with sending a message about the kind of character the Bears organization wants represented. Hurds special teams contributions will be lost but special teams coach Dave Toub will fill the void with another capable player. Open it upIve been preaching for MikeMartz to minimize Caleb Hanie's opportunities for mistakes. Martz did an incredible job in this department against Denver last week and the Bears still lost 13-10. Seattle is stouter defensively with their front seven than Denver and running the football will be a challenge for Chicago. Marion Barber should be motivated after being last weeks goat, but rushing for over 100 yards on 27 carries like against Denver will be difficult.The running game works against the Bears this week because being productive on first and second down was an issue last week. They cannot survive trying to convert as many3rd and 16situations like against Denver.Rushing attempts will be better served onthird down or second andsix yards or more situations when Seattle substitutes in their speed rushers.Thus, offensive production is going to be required fromHanie and the receivers onfirst andsecond down. I dont particularly like this matchup either for Chicago as Seattle cornerbacks Richard Sherman and Brandon Browner are both over six feet tall with excellent running ability. They both have played very well the past few weeks.If wide receievers Johnny Knox, Earl Bennett, Devin Hester or Roy Williams do not get physical off the line of scrimmage throughout the entirety of their route, it will be a long day for the Bears again offensively. Play with your hair on fireI love that saying.It truly applies this week for the entire Bears roster in all three phases. Seattle presents an absolute must win game scenario for the Bears to keep their playoff hopes alive. Chicago has good matchups in the trenches on defense against Seattles offensive line which has been decimated by injuries.Seattle has backups upon backups starting at this point on their offensive line.The Bears defense is still number two in the NFC and eighth overall yielding only 19.6 points a game.But this is where the Bears biggest problem exists. Chicago only averages 11 pointsper game offensively since Hanie assumed the starting quarterback role for an injured Jay Cutler.

Bears training camp preview: 3 burning questions for coaching staff

Bears training camp preview: 3 burning questions for coaching staff

With Bears players reporting for training camp Wednesday, CSN Chicago’s Chris Boden and JJ Stankevitz have been spending the last two weeks looking at three burning questions at each position group. The series concludes with Boden’ s look at the coaching staff.

1. Can John Fox find a balance between necessary snaps, and staying healthy?

Unless he’s practicing this team every day (he’s not) and hitting every day (he’s not doing that, either), a coach really can’t be blamed for injuries. That out-of-his-hands factor has kept his first two years from a true evaluation, yet every team has to deal with them. He and Ryan Pace have been particularly hamstrung (pun intended) by the fact so many key, high draft picks/building blocks and impact free agent signings (see Pernell McPhee, Danny Trevathan, Eddie Royal) have spent significant time on the sidelines. 

Fox tweaked the workout schedule in Bourbonnais with more consistent start times (all in the 11 a.m. hour), mixing in off-days and walk-throughs. Yet there are heavy competitions to sift through, particularly at wide receiver, cornerback, and safety, and projected starters must learn to get used to each other (and the offense get used to Mike Glennon) so that miscommunication is at a minimum. The Falcons, Buccaneers, Steelers and Packers won’t wait for them to get on the same page over the first 19 days of the regular season.

2. How does Dowell Loggains divide up quarterback snaps?

His starting quarterback basically hasn’t played since 2014 and is trying to master a new system, working with new receivers. All while Mike Glennon tries to be “all systems go”-ready on Sept. 10. Loggains is also in charge of developing the quarterback of the future, who never previously worked under center or called a huddle. If Mitch Trubisky isn’t the backup to start the season, Mark Sanchez, who missed all of minicamp with a knee injury, has to gain enough of a comfort level with the playbook and his receivers to slide in in the event of an emergency. These practices usually top out at about two hours, maybe a bit longer. Will there basically be two practices going on at the same time? If so, how can Loggains and the offensive assistants not overdo it for those at other positions?

3. Are Vic Fangio and Leonard Floyd tied at the hip?

The defensive coordinator still oversees all the position groups, but will focus particularly on the oustide linebackers and the prized pupil, Leonard Floyd. Fangio says he liked what he’s seen of the 2016 first-round pick this off-season, once he recovered from his second concussion. But he said all the bumps, bruises, strains, pulls, and bell-ringing didn’t mean anything more than an incomplete rookie grade. At this point, he’d probably like to be joined to Floyd’s hip in Bourbonnais, because that means he’ll be staying on the practice field, learning. “3b” in this category would be Ed Donatell sorting through a long list of young defensive backs to find the right pieces to keep for the present and future, in addition to finding four starters who’ll take the ball away a lot better than they’ve done the past two seasons.

Bears training camp preview: Three burning questions for the offensive line

Bears training camp preview: Three burning questions for the offensive line

With training camp starting next week, CSN Chicago’s Chris Boden and JJ Stankevitz are looking at three burning questions for each of the Bears’ position groups heading into Bourbonnais. Friday's unit: the offensive line. 

1. Will Kyle Long and Josh Sitton flip spots, and will it be effective?

One of the more intriguing storylines to come out of the Bears’ offseason program was the possibility of a Kyle Long-Josh Sitton guard swap, with Long moving from right to left and Sitton to left to right. The prevailing wisdom is that Long’s athleticism would be better suited for the pulls needed at left guard, while Sitton has made Pro Bowls at both positions. But is it prudent for the Bears to make this switch with Long still recovering from November ankle surgery and some nasty complications that came after it? He’s shown he’s skilled enough to already make one position switch on the offensive line (from right tackle to right guard), so there’s no reason to doubt he couldn’t handle another so long as he’s healthy. We’ll see where he is next week. 

“You want flexibility,” coach John Fox said. “You don’t want as much flexibility as we had to use a year ago because we had to play so many guys due to injury. But we’re messing around with (Sitton) and Kyle both playing opposite sides, whether one’s on the left, one’s on the right. We’ll get those looks in camp, we got plenty of time.”

2. Can Charles Leno Jr. capitalize on a contract year?

Leno has been a pleasant surprise given the low expectations usually set for seventh-round picks. He started every game in 2016, checking off an important box for John Fox — reliability. Whether Leno can be more than a reliable player at left tackle, though, remains to be seen (if the Bears thought he were, wouldn’t they have signed him to an extension by now?). He has one more training camp and 16 games to prove he’s worthy of a deal to be the Bears (or someone else’s) left tackle of the future. Otherwise, the Bears may look to a 2018 draft class rich in tackles led by Texas’ Connor Williams and Notre Dame’s Mike McGlinchey. 

“I know if I take care of my business out here, everything else will take care of itself,” Leno said. 

3. Will Hroniss Grasu survive the roster crunch?

A year ago, Grasu was coming off a promising rookie season and was in line to be the Bears’ starting center. But the Oregon product tore his ACL in August, and Cody Whitehair thrived after a last-minute move from guard to center. If the Bears keep eight offensive lineman this year, Grasu could be squeezed out: Leno, Long, Whitehair, Sitton and Bobby Massie are the likely starters, with Eric Kush and Tom Compton filling reserve roles. That leaves one spot, either for fifth-round guard Jordan Morgan or Grasu. The Bears could try to stash Morgan, who played his college ball at Division-II Kutztown, on the practice squad and keep Grasu. But Grasu doesn’t have flexibility to play another position besides center, which could hurt his case.