Chicago Bears

Moon: A new idea to end the CBA stalemate

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Moon: A new idea to end the CBA stalemate

Thursday, Feb. 17, 20111:45 p.m.
By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Untying the Gordian knot of the NFLs collective bargaining agreement has been and will continue to be difficult. A proposed solution from Mike Florio at ProFootballTalk.com might offer at least a new tack to take in the direction that the NFL players want to go but without sacrificing core confidentiality that owners require.

Mikes idea on the disclosure of financial information, using an independent accounting firm acting in strict confidence, is along a line that should work for the owners, if they indeed want to reach an agreement with a group comprised of their de facto business partners.

The league in the past has used what was called an independent verifier for contract proposals. Team negotiators and agents could verify the accuracy of claims that a particular contract proposal had been put forward. Players are saying that they will work with the numbers proposed by ownership but would like books opened as a way of verifying the level of need the owners are claiming.

Applying that sort of mechanism here might clear one big hurdle in a mess that seems to have shrinking chances of clearing up as time goes along.

NFL Networks Rich Eisen visited with Dan Patrick on The Dan Patrick Show and tossed around with Dan an overhaul that would expand the number of regular-season games as well as playoff teams. The net would be an increase of meaningful (i.e. not preseason) television weeks from 21 now (17 regular season, three conference playoffs, Super Bowl) to 23.

Sold, Rich said. Good thought.
Market-setting

The Green Bay Packers are finishing up the details of a three-year contract extension for coach Mike McCarthy, a deal that expected to pay McCarthy 5 million per season and likely to cap the pay grade for Lovie Smith.

Bob McGinn reports in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinal that McCarthys current contract runs through 2012 and the new deal signs him through 2015.

There are coaches with bigger paychecks but not many, and as we have been noting for some time, the market is dipping for head-coach salaries as teams follow the course the Pittsburgh Steelers did with Mike Tomlin with great success. First-time coaches at more modest prices have been as or more successful than bigger-ticket field bosses like Mike Shanahan.

The Washington Redskins needed to wave 7 million in front of Shanahan but he listed two Super Bowl wins on his resume. The San Francisco 49ers did give first-timer Jim Harbaugh 5 million per season but insiders said ownership effectively told the front office that Harbaugh was the pick, leaving little room for negotiation.

The expectation remains that the Bears will at least offer Smith an extension at his current rate of about 5 million. Two additional years in this market should be good enough for Smith, who did not win his Super Bowl, whereas McCarthy did.

McCarthys new contract will place him in the top 10 of NFL coach salaries. Smith already is there.
Duly noted

ESPN draft analyst Todd McShay is of the mind that the successes of mobile quarterbacks like Aaron Rodgers and Ben Roethlisberger, on top of a solid, sustained career run by Donovan McNabb (add 2010s Jay Cutler to that discussion), will weigh heavily in favor of Auburns Cam Newton. The more of these mobile quarterbacks that succeed in the NFL, McShay said Wednesday, the more teams will be willing to look outside the usual parameters."

Bears tight end Brandon Manumaleuna will undergo arthroscopic surgery on his right knee this offseason, the Chicago Tribune reports. Manumaleuna had a similar procedure last offseason and missed considerable training camp time. Sources told CSNChicago.com that Manumaleuna was regularly fined for being overweight during last season and it may be interesting to see if he downsizes to add quickness as well as take stress off his knees.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Mitch Trubisky will eventually make a glaring mistake, and why he'll respond to it well

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USA Today Sports Images

Mitch Trubisky will eventually make a glaring mistake, and why he'll respond to it well

John Fox likes to use a formula to determine how a player will respond to adversity: Events + Responses = Outcomes (E + R = O). Mitch Trubisky hasn’t experienced much adversity in his first two preseason games, but if how he’s handled the mistakes he’s made in practice is any indication, he’ll respond to those well. 

“Your response typically equals the outcome,” Fox said. “If you haven’t dropped a ball, haven’t missed a pass, you haven’t thrown a pick, you haven’t played. It’s how they respond.”

Trubisky missed a few passes Saturday night against the Arizona Cardinals and was battered a bit behind a third-string offensive line. But he hasn’t thrown an interception in 33 preseason attempts, and his final line Saturday — 6/8, 60 yards, 1 TD — was solid, though not as spectacular as his preseason debut. 

Consider this, though: Two days before lighting up the Denver Broncos (second/third/fourth-string) defense, Mitch Trubisky ended practice by throwing an interception to Deiondre’ Hall in the end zone.

“It sucks,” Trubisky said. “The rest of my day will not feel as great since I ended practice that way.”

Trubisky responded to that pick by, in the short term, making a few more throws after practice. He then went out and dazzled against Denver, completing 18 of 25 passes for 166 yards with a touchdown and no interceptions. 

“It’s all about, for me, not making the same mistake twice,” Trubisky said. “So, you can make a mistake and that’s going to happen, especially for rookies, but it’s all about overcoming that, learning from it and don’t let it happen again. And I think I’ve done a pretty good job of that so far.”

Trubisky speaks confidently and acts that way in both practice and games. There is some general risk associated with playing a rookie quarterback before he’s “ready,” because if he struggles his confidence could be severely damaged. 

With Trubisky, though, there doesn’t seem to be as great of a confidence risk if the Bears do decide to play him early.

Of course, the best way for Trubisky to avoid a hit to his confidence is to not make any mistakes. But inevitably, he’ll throw an interception or have a bad game. That’ll be the E in that equation Fox likes. 

And, so far, Trubisky — who thought he played “alright” against Arizona —  has shown his “R” will probably be good. That’s another mark in his favor for being ready to play earlier than was expected when the Bears drafted him in April. 

WATCH: Deonte Thompson channels inner Devin Hester with 109-yard return in Bears preseason game

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AP

WATCH: Deonte Thompson channels inner Devin Hester with 109-yard return in Bears preseason game

It's been a while since Devin Hester electrified the city of Chicago with his touchdown returns, but we got flashbacks of that Saturday night.

Deonte Thompson took a page out of the book of arguably the best returner in NFL history by returning a 109-yard missed field goal to the house as the first half expired during the Bears' second preseason game in Arizona.

It gave the Bears a 17-7 lead, and even had John Fox going crazy on the sideline:

Deonte Thompson, you are ridiculous?