Moon: Second extension to CBA talks likely

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Moon: Second extension to CBA talks likely

Friday, March 4, 2011
10:30 a.m.
By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

The trickle of hope in NFLNFLPA negotiations hasnt stopped, which remains a good thing even if the ultimate prize of a new collective bargaining agreement hasnt been landed just yet. Mike Florio at ProFootballTalk.com encapsulates many of the wisps of thought circulating but the net is that a second extension to talks is appearing increasingly likely, and at this point this is more than just jockeying for some nebulous high PR ground.

The clock continues ticking and nothing other than these negotiations are permitted by an extension, meaning ostensibly that no contract negotiations can get done in the grace period. But the unmistakable mood is continuing to be guarded optimism from all reports.
Money matters
The Bears have given themselves some salary cap help with a deft restructuring of Julius Peppers contract, as first reported by ESPNChicago.com. Its a common move, one in this case that takes no money from the Pro Bowl defensive end but spreads out the cap hit of a 10.5 million bonus due him this year.

The option in the deal worked out by agent Carl Carey and Bears negotiator Cliff Stein allowed the Bears to change the bonus from a roster bonus, which is charged entirely to the year in which it is paid, to a signing bonus, which is averaged over the remaining years of the contract, in this case the next five. This saves the Bears 8.4 million under this years cap because instead of the 10.5 million being charged to 2011, the hit is about 2.1 million in each of the next five years.

Teams like roster bonuses because the money is charged and gone. But Carey and Stein incorporating the option helps free cap money for spending when the CBA situation is resolved.

And am I the only one wondering if Carey and Stein were left alone in a room, they might have this labor mess worked out by dinner time?

Kidding, obviously, but one of my favorite movies is Dave, in no small part because of the scenes in which Murray the accountant comes to the White House and pares about 650 million from the federal budget. Its Hollywood, but never, ever underestimate what common sense can do in the right hands.
Duly noted

CSNNE.com colleague Tom Curran will be visiting with Mike Florio on ProFootballTalk.coms Pro Football Talk Live. T.C. is one of the best and has had missile-lock on the Patriots for quite some time, which becomes significant here because Tom Brady and Logan Mankins are potentially among the A-list plaintiffs in any class-action lawsuit by the NFL players vs. the league in the event of union decertification. Also, Pats owner Robert Kraft is a major player in the CBA issues, and hes not a quiet one.

Andrew Brandt of the National Football Post does a quality, eminently understandable run-through of the issues now in front of the two sides in talks. Andrew was in the Green Bay front office during the 2006 negotiations and here he gives a nice thumbnail of how mediator George Cohen has structured the logistics of talks.

Robert Gallery, the Iowa big dog who became the No. 2 overall pick of the 2004 draft, is out of Oakland after he and the Raiders were simply too far apart on a new contract to leave any hope there. Gallery is not an elite talent at guard but in the right system and with a coach like Mike Tice. Now, guards have gotten into the 7 million - 8 million salary range and whether he fits price-wise and ability wise for the Bears is something better judged once the new salary cap is established once a labor agreement is reached. But rule nothing out.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Mark Sanchez officially signs with Bears

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Mark Sanchez officially signs with Bears

On the latest edition of the SportsTalk Live Podcast, Chris Emma, Seth Gruen and Danny Ecker join David Kaplan to discuss the Mark Sanchez signing. Does this mean the Bears won't draft a quarterback in the 2017 NFL Draft? 

Later, the White Sox named Jose Quintana their Opening Day starter, but lose Carlos Rodon and Todd Frazier to injuries. 

Finally, Robin Lopez is back after serving a one-game suspension. The panel looks at the Bulls matchup against the Philadelphia 76ers. 

Listen to the SportsTalk Live Podcast below. 

Noise around QB Mark Sanchez misses bigger, far more important goal for Bears ’17 offseason

Noise around QB Mark Sanchez misses bigger, far more important goal for Bears ’17 offseason

The tumult around the Bears quarterback position this offseason – signing Mike Glennon, cutting Jay Cutler, not signing Brian Hoyer, now signing Mark Sanchez – was to be expected. (Well, not all the brouhaha around Sanchez; if there has ever been more hyperventilating around the arriving backup quarterback, it’s escaping my recollections of a quarter-century on the beat.)

All of that, and a lot of the noise around Mike Glennon is really missing a larger point. A couple, really.

GM Ryan Pace established fixing the quarterback situation as a top priority, something it has been just about since Jim McMahon left, with the exception of a few Jay Cutler years. Doing that to any meaningful degree with the castoff options available in free agency or via trades wasn’t ever going to happen. What Pace has done with the quarterback situation, however, is more than a little intriguing.

The quarterback additions and subtractions, coupled with also suggest a draft plan far from locked in on a quarterback. The signings of Glennon and Sanchez don’t mean the Bears have solved their quarterback position, but it does mean the Bears have positioned themselves with the distinct option of NOT taking a quarterback – this year.

But here’s the bigger point.

Even with the optimum quarterback solution unavailable – Pace arguably did go best-available in his and the coaches’ minds with Glennon and Sanchez, all derision aside – Pace’s goal needs to be building a team that can reach a high playoff level regardless of quarterback.

Meaning: defense. And while the 2017 free agent and draft classes did not offer must-have quarterbacks in most evaluations, there are those elite-level defensive talents, and every indication is that the Bears will look there, in the draft, and should be. It had that feeling when the Bears, with ample, money to spend, backed away from day one free-agency runs at a couple of pricey defensive backs. The Bears simply think they can do better for less in the draft.

A perspective: With a defense at its levels during the Brian Urlacher era, the Bears could reach the NFC championship game with what they have at quarterback now. They did, twice, with Rex Grossman and with Cutler. Sanchez got to AFC championship games in each of his first two seasons. The Bears reached a Super Bowl with Rex Grossman as their quarterback. They went 13-3 in 2001 with a solid-but-unspectacular Jim Miller as their quarterback. They reached the 2005 playoffs with Kyle Orton as their starter most of that year, and should have been in the 2008 playoffs with him as well. The Bears reached the NFC championship game in 2010 with Cutler.

There is a common denominator in all of these situations, and it is within Pace’s grasp, and that was an elite defense. Rex Ryan had one with the Jets and Sanchez, Grossman and Orton and Cutler had theirs with Urlacher, Lance Briggs, Mike Brown, Tommie Harris, Charles Tillman, etc.

Forget the quarterback situation for now. Nothing anyone, including Pace, can really do anything about it (other than land possibly Deshaun Watson, based on their turnout at his Pro Day).

But if Pace and his personnel staff do this right, they can lay in the foundation for something elite on defense that will transcend the quarterback, or at least allow the Bears to play more than 16 games in a season even if they do not have a great quarterback. With the Urlacher core defense, the Bears went to postseasons with four different quarterbacks.

The prime directive now for Ryan Pace is to create precisely that model again.