Mullin: 1934 'Sneakers Game' repeat?

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Mullin: 1934 'Sneakers Game' repeat?

Saturday, Dec. 18, 2010
3:33 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Now that it appears the Bears will indeed be playing outside at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis against the Vikings, it is time to turn to matters of true import.

Likeshoes.

The Bears have been on the wrong end of icy conditions in big games at memorable times in the past. They are planning on a different outcome this time, with the field at expected at worst to be nothing short of a sheet of ice by the second half next Monday night, possibly sooner.

I just dont want to be on Skating with the Stars, said defensive tackle Anthony Adams.

A number of players told CSNChicago.com that they indeed are preparing for the Minnesota game with non-cleated, sneakers-style footwear.

Some are considering more extreme measures, if only in fun.

Snow boots, said linebacker Lance Briggs. You know, the boots with the tennis rackets on the bottom. Those are the ones right there. Cross country skis, yeah.

Bears players wore sneakers in the Green Bay game last Dec. 13 in Soldier Field. Cleats wont dig into the grass, the surface, Adams said. Its like being on skates.

Footwear is the individual players choice and a key is understanding that what feels OK in warmups may not work once the play begins in earnest.

Its going to be different once the double-team hits you. Its different from just running around, when two O-linemen are trying to press you out of the gap.

The Bears were victimized in the famous 1934 Sneakers Game, the NFL Championship game in New York. With both teams sliding around on an icy field during the first half, the Giants equipment man went to nearby Manhattan College, borrowed nine pairs of sneakers. The Giants went from trailing 13-3 to a 30-13 victory.

The Bears dont envision that scenario for themselves.

Well have the proper shoe on, coach Lovie Smith said, clearly not unhappy to see a week of talk about cold, indoorsoutdoors, ice and now shoes is winding down. I think were too deep into this now. Every surface we have, well have the proper shoe on for that. We have guys looking for that. You work through to find the perfect shoe each week and this is no different than that.
Sick bay

Linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa, who practiced fully on Friday, was limited on Saturdays work at Northwestern Universitys practice field and is listed as questionable.

All-Pro guard Steve Hutchinson will miss his third straight game with a broken thumb and hell have a seat next to the man he helped persuade come back for the 2010 season, Brett Favre. The quarterback is officially out with his shoulder injury, as is safety Tyrell Johnson (concussion).

Hutchinson is an all-pro lineman for them, Lovie Smith said. But he hasnt played in a few games so they have moved on a little bit without him. But I dont think youre ever as good a football team as you would be with a player like that. Seems like this time of year except for maybe the Chicago Bears were not missing a lot of guys most teams are missing some of their players.

Running back Adrian Peterson practiced for the first time this week, albeit on a limited basis, and is listed as questionable, although no one expects the franchise running back to miss the game. Defensive end Ray Edwards (ankle) also practiced on a limited basis and is questionable, as is safety Jamarca Sanford (concussion).
Homecoming

Defensive end Corey Wootton had to endure some good-natured ribbing Saturday as Bears buses pulled up and delivered players to Northwestern Universitys outdoors practice fields. The Bears moved practice there in order to get a days orientation to artificial turf similar to that in TCF Bank Stadium and also to work on it outdoors rather than just another day on artificial turf but indoors at the Walter Payton Center.

It was fun being back where I played for five years, said Wootton, a Northwestern grad selected by the Bears in the fourth round of the 2010 draft. Guys were kidding me, though: Oh, Coreys homecoming. But it was nice.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears linebacker Jerrell Freeman saved a man's life at an airport

Bears linebacker Jerrell Freeman saved a man's life at an airport

Jerrell Freeman played hero at an Austin airport on Sunday.

The Bears linebacker was grabbing a bite to eat before his flight to head back to Chicago for training camp when he noticed a man choking.

Freeman said an older lady tried to perform the Heimlich maneuver on the man but didn't have enough strength. That's when Freeman stepped in, and after a couple attempts, saved his life.

“I grabbed him and tried to squeeze the life out of him,” Freeman told the Chicago Tribune. “You’ve got to push in and up. So I did that and he started throwing up what he was choking on. I asked him if he was all right and he shook his head like ‘No!’

“I grabbed him again and hit him again with it. And when I put him down the second time, his eyes got big. He was like, ‘Oh, my god! I think you just saved my life, man!’ It was crazy.”

Freeman tweeted a picture after it happened:

Freeman, 31, said he had never done the Heimlich maneuver before, but his mom is a nurse and had talked to him about it. He just did what he heard, and thankfully it worked.

Bears training camp preview: 3 burning questions for coaching staff

Bears training camp preview: 3 burning questions for coaching staff

With Bears players reporting for training camp Wednesday, CSN Chicago’s Chris Boden and JJ Stankevitz have been spending the last two weeks looking at three burning questions at each position group. The series concludes with Boden’ s look at the coaching staff.

1. Can John Fox find a balance between necessary snaps, and staying healthy?

Unless he’s practicing this team every day (he’s not) and hitting every day (he’s not doing that, either), a coach really can’t be blamed for injuries. That out-of-his-hands factor has kept his first two years from a true evaluation, yet every team has to deal with them. He and Ryan Pace have been particularly hamstrung (pun intended) by the fact so many key, high draft picks/building blocks and impact free agent signings (see Pernell McPhee, Danny Trevathan, Eddie Royal) have spent significant time on the sidelines. 

Fox tweaked the workout schedule in Bourbonnais with more consistent start times (all in the 11 a.m. hour), mixing in off-days and walk-throughs. Yet there are heavy competitions to sift through, particularly at wide receiver, cornerback, and safety, and projected starters must learn to get used to each other (and the offense get used to Mike Glennon) so that miscommunication is at a minimum. The Falcons, Buccaneers, Steelers and Packers won’t wait for them to get on the same page over the first 19 days of the regular season.

2. How does Dowell Loggains divide up quarterback snaps?

His starting quarterback basically hasn’t played since 2014 and is trying to master a new system, working with new receivers. All while Mike Glennon tries to be “all systems go”-ready on Sept. 10. Loggains is also in charge of developing the quarterback of the future, who never previously worked under center or called a huddle. If Mitch Trubisky isn’t the backup to start the season, Mark Sanchez, who missed all of minicamp with a knee injury, has to gain enough of a comfort level with the playbook and his receivers to slide in in the event of an emergency. These practices usually top out at about two hours, maybe a bit longer. Will there basically be two practices going on at the same time? If so, how can Loggains and the offensive assistants not overdo it for those at other positions?

3. Are Vic Fangio and Leonard Floyd tied at the hip?

The defensive coordinator still oversees all the position groups, but will focus particularly on the oustide linebackers and the prized pupil, Leonard Floyd. Fangio says he liked what he’s seen of the 2016 first-round pick this off-season, once he recovered from his second concussion. But he said all the bumps, bruises, strains, pulls, and bell-ringing didn’t mean anything more than an incomplete rookie grade. At this point, he’d probably like to be joined to Floyd’s hip in Bourbonnais, because that means he’ll be staying on the practice field, learning. “3b” in this category would be Ed Donatell sorting through a long list of young defensive backs to find the right pieces to keep for the present and future, in addition to finding four starters who’ll take the ball away a lot better than they’ve done the past two seasons.