Mullin: Bears should be proud of their books

Mullin: Bears should be proud of their books

Saturday, March 26, 2011Posted: 11:30 AM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

The Bears have operated successfully for a long, long time, as long in fact as theres been an NFL and even a little before that. And if itll help advance the cause of an agreement between league owners and players, theyre willing to show those needing to know.

And this could be part of a building movement that breaks the stalemate that is threatening at least the NFL offseason, if not more.

Bears President Ted Phillips has aligned the Bears with the Dallas Cowboys (and the already publicly owned Green Bay Packers, plus the Denver Broncos potentially) as teams open to the idea of open books, something demanded by the players side as long as owners are asking for a 1 billion giveback to help teams with operating expenses.

If the league feels to get a deal done, they need to release financials, were on board, Phillips told the Chicago Sun-Times. Im actually proud of how we operate our club. We think we do a good job, revenue-wise and expense-wise.

The Bears have. Without violating confidences here, the Bears have been aware of the looming labor difficulties for a matter of years and they were managing expenses with an eye toward the future. So it was no surprise at all that the Phillips and the Bears were out front with the fact that they were not anticipating layoffs, pay cuts or some of the carnage that has nicked some teams.

And whats too often glossed over in the interest of keeping a good clich running, the Bears have done all of this without coming anywhere close to their Misers of the Midway misnomer. The Bears have spent money, not always on the right players or even coaches at times, but they have spent it.

Consider: Besides doing a new Lovie Smith contract with years in excess of 5 million, the Bears also have coordinators (Rod Marinelli, Mike Martz) in the 1 million range plus an offensive line coach (Mike Tice) in the upper echelon of his position pay grade.

More to the on-field point, in recent years they have done market or above deals with Lance Briggs, Jay Cutler, Tommie Harris, Julius Peppers and Brian Urlacher, some as extensions, like Smith. Muhsin Muhammad, John Tait.

The list of money deals goes on but you get the point. Phillips was the finance man under Michael McCaskey before succeeding him as president in 1999 (the year the Bears hosed down Phillip Daniels and Thomas Smith with signing mega-deals). The contracts done by GM Jerry Angelo and finance man Cliff Stein are known throughout the league as real deals, meaning ones without inflated final years that no one will ever see and force players to be cut.

Its easy to make jokes about the Bears and their money. Those jokes are old and years out of date. And no one should be laughing, least of all some of the other owners who are not remotely as effective financially as the Bears. As the McCaskeys have accurately stated over the years, their only business is football and the Chicago Bears. Theyre not Daniel Snyder (thankfully), nor have they ever aspired to be.

They can be and should be proud of those books.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears Talk Podcast: Reacting to acquisition of QB Mitch Trubisky

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USA TODAY

Bears Talk Podcast: Reacting to acquisition of QB Mitch Trubisky

In the first round of the 2017 NFL Draft, the Bears traded up to No. 2 overall and drafted QB Mitchell Trubisky out of North Carolina. Chris Boden, Alex Brown, and Hub Arkush sat down and talked about the moves made by Ryan Pace and what this means for the franchise's future. 

Also, hear from Trubisky himself speaking at the podium in Philadelphia as well as his former Tarheel Head Coach, Larry Fedora on what the signal caller can bring to the Bears. Finally, listen to the full podium availability of Pace after day one of the draft.

Listen to the Bears Talk Podcast below.

Bears will not have quarterback competition: ‘Glennon is our starter’

Bears will not have quarterback competition: ‘Glennon is our starter’

The Bears’ aggressive decision to trade up and draft Mitchell Trubisky with the No. 2 pick won’t create a quarterback competition this summer and fall, general manager Ryan Pace said. 

Pace made it clear that Mike Glennon, who the Bears signed in March, will be the team’s starting quarterback when they open the 2017 season Sept. 10 against the Atlanta Falcons. 

“There’s no quarterback competition when Mitch gets here,” Pace said. “Glennon is our starting quarterback. We’ll focus on Mitch’s development and Mike Glennon winning games for the Chicago Bears.”

Both Glennon and Trubisky, though, are no strangers to quarterback competitions — and coming out on the wrong side of them. Glennon, with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, lost his starting job midway through the 2013 season to Josh McCown, then permanently was relegated to backup duty when Jamies Winston was picked first overall in 2014. 

Trubisky, too, was unable to beat out Marquise Williams for North Carolina’s starting quarterback job in 2014 and 2015, only taking over after the graduation of Williams, an undrafted free agent who didn’t stick on an NFL roster. Pace pointed to Williams having “chemistry” within the Tarheels’ offense, though, which powered North Carolina to an 11-win season in 2015. 

Pace said the Bears don’t have a timetable for when they expect Trubisky to take over as the team’s starter. But given Glennon’s contract is structured so the Bears could cut him for $2.5 million next year — bringing his guaranteed money to $18.5 million — there could be an opening for Trubisky as soon as 2018.

It’s worth noting, too, that it’s rare for quarterbacks in the same range as Trubisky to not play in their rookie years. The last quarterback drafted in the top 10 to not start a game their first year in the league was Tennessee’s Jake Locker (eighth overall) in 2011. And the last time a quarterback effectively was benched his entire rookie year was 2004, when fourth overall pick Philip Rivers appeared in two games and attempted eight passes for the San Diego Chargers.

But the Bears won’t plan on Trubisky taking playing time away from Glennon this fall, and feel they have an ideal situation set up to develop their highest draft pick since the AFL-NFL merger. 

“I talked to Mike tonight, he understands the competitiveness of our business at every single position,” Pace said. “Mike also understands he’s our starting quarterback. Mike’s been here working hard all the time, already developing leadership with his teammates. I’m extremely excited about Mike Glennon this season and I’m extremely excited about adding Mitch to our roster.”