Mullin: Best collection of Bears skill players?

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Mullin: Best collection of Bears skill players?

Monday, Sept. 12, 2011
Posted: 10:46 p.m.

By JohnMullin
CSNChicago.com BearsInsider Follow@CSNMoonMullin
Every Monday afternoon I have a good time talking Bears with the folks at SportsRadio 1450, WFMB-AM in Springfield (and the Bears have some serious fans downstate). The guys put a great question on the table in the aftermath of the Atlanta game:

Is this the best collection of Bears skill players in the last 25 years?

The quick-evaluation answer on the show: Yes.

With more time to think about it and look back in some detail: Yes.

These comparison things are generally tiresome and clich. Usually its comparing the defense to the 1985 or 1986 group; enough of that, please.

But since the guys downstate asked, lets think about it:

For all of the Jay Cutler debate, or whether Matt Forte is worth Chris JohnsonFrank Gorewhoever money, or whether the Bears have or even need a No. 1 receiver, looking at the skill players was more fun.

Sadly, the points of comparison are pretty scant. The 1988 group, basically. Maybe the 1995 core of Erik Kramer-Rashaan Salaam-Curtis Conway-Jeff Graham. Thats about it.

1988?

Right now, Cutler is a better passer and arguably as good a quarterback as the 1988 Jim McMahon; Neal Anderson and Forte are a wash and two of the best all-around backs in franchise history. Tight ends are bit players in both systems.

But the 2011 Bears wide-receiver group is significantly better than Dennis McKinnon (best season, 45 catches) group, even if none of Earl Bennett - Devin Hester - Johnny Knox - Roy Williams - Sam Hurd - Dane Sanzenbacher are remotely in McKinnons class as a blocker.

I didnt consider the Bears receivers trash last year and I definitely dont now. Whether theyre anywhere close to good enough for reaching a Super Bowl (they showed last year that they were), go ahead; have at it. But this corps is the deepest for the Bears of the past quarter-century.
1995?

The 1995 group is the only other one with a seat at the table. Cutler hasnt had a season yet thats quite at the level of Kramer and his 93.5 passer rating, but Cutler has topped 100 for passer rating in six of the last nine games, including Sundays 107.8. Forte is a better runner, a far better blocker and an exponentially more accomplished receiver than Salaam. Plus, he holds onto the football.

Conway and Graham were both 1,000-yard receivers and each was better than any of Bears wideout right now. Those are the only two from the 95 skills who would start for the 2011 Bears, unless you like Keith Jennings over Matt SpaethKellen Davis.

But would you take Michael Timpson as your No. 3, or Bennett? Knox? For this offense and this quarterback, no comparison. And does anybody not think the 2011 group has a collective arrow pointing up?

None of these comparisons mean a whole lot. But as clichd as it has been to denigrate particularly the Bears wide receivers, give it all a rest. Enjoy it. This group may not play more than 16 games (the 95ers didnt) but its as good as theres been here since Walter Paytons era.

They can see that all the way down in Springfield.

Passing thoughts

Atlantas Matt Ryan became the latest quarterback to perform below his norm against the Bears. Of the 18 quarterbacks facing the Bears last season (not including fill-in Drew Stanton in Detroit), only Tom Brady (Patriots), Mark Sanchez (Jets) and Matt Hasselbeck (Seahawks) twice managed to reach their season passer rating against the Chicago defense.

Ryan, a 91.0 passer in 2010, posted just a 76.5 rating against the Bears.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears announce training camp schedule

Bears announce training camp schedule

The Bears released their official training camp schedule Thursday morning. After reporting to Olivet Nazarene on Wednesday, July 26, the first of ten practices open to the public will take place the following day. The Bears will be based out of Bourbonnais for the 16th straight season. Training camp will go through Sunday, Aug. 13 before the Bears break camp and finish the preseason in Lake Forest. 

All practices are tentatively scheduled to start at various times during the 11 a.m. hour with the exception of Saturday, Aug. 13, which starts at 12:05 p.m. Those times are subject to change based on weather, and a varying set of schedules that John Fox and his coaching staff have set up, as they adjust to player and training staff preferences in hopes of reducing injuries. 

Also, new this season, fans wanting to attend practices must order free tickets in advance through the Bears website. Fans will not be allowed in without a ticket, and the first 1,000 fans each day will be given various souvenirs. The practice campus will be open to the public with tickets from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Here is the full training camp schedule:

After historically low turnover total in 2016, what can Bears do to get more takeaways?

After historically low turnover total in 2016, what can Bears do to get more takeaways?

Quintin Demps set a career high in interceptions last year by not doing anything different. And that’s the message he’s sending a defense that generated only 11 takeaways in 2016, tied for the lowest single-season total in NFL history. 

Demps went from picking off four passes in both 2013 with the Kansas City Chiefs and 2014 with the New York Giants to notching just one interception with the Houston Texans in 2015. In 2016, though, Demps intercepted six passes, broke up nine more and totaled 38 tackles. 

“Turnovers are like, it’s not something that you go get, it’s something you let come to you by doing your job first and then helping out,” Demps said. “And then you’d be surprised how they come to you by doing your job and being aware of when you can help somebody out. A lot of times when you get help is when you get picks and turnovers.”

The danger for a defense coming off a historically bad takeaway is sort of a whiplash effect, where there’s an over-emphasis on creating turnovers and not enough attention paid to, as Demps said, “doing your job.” There’s a fine line between being opportunistic and undisciplined.

“I tell my safeties all the time, we gotta tackle first,” Demps said. “Tackle first, don’t miss any tackles and then the picks are going to come. I promise you that.”

The Bears felt positively after signs of being more opportunistic as a defense during shorts-and-helmets practices in May and June, though if that was because of any real improvements or because the defense is usually ahead of the offense is hard to tell at this stage of the year. 

The offseason program was valuable for the Bears’ secondary in growing trust within a group that had — no pun intended — plenty of turnover after the 2016 season. The hope is that the offseason additions of Demps, Prince Amukamara, Marcus Cooper and Eddie Jackson will solidify the secondary and lead to something better than last year’s historically-low turnover total. 

“We’re still trying to build something, but the actual, real building happens in training camp because I think then you start to see the group start to get formed and yo know who’s going to go with the one’s, who’s going to go with the two’s, stuff like that,” Amukamara said. “So I think that starts to get formed. But I think with a lot of guys now, I think what that creates is competition and guys trying their hardest to make the team.”