Mullin: Lions' QB Stanton not fond of Martz

Mullin: Lions' QB Stanton not fond of Martz

Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2010
Posted: 8:20 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

A number of NFL quarterbacks -- Kurt Warner, Jon Kitna, maybe Jay Cutler -- have had the best years of their career with Mike Martz as their offensive coordinator.

For Detroit Lions quarterback Drew Stanton, announced as the starter Sunday vs. the Bears, the year with Martz sounds like just about his worst.

Before suffering a knee injury and going on IR before the season, Stanton labored (probably the word Stanton would choose as well) under Martz as a rookie in 2007 when Martz was Detroit's offensive coordinator. That Stanton is still in the NFL might be in spite of Martz rather than because of him, to hear Stanton tell it Wednesday to Tom Kowalski on MLive.com.

Martz reportedly changed Stanton's mechanics completely, frustrating both quarterback and coordinator

"That's behind me and I want to leave it back there," Stanton said, effectively damning with faint praise. "That was something that I had to go through and I grew up in the process. I'm stronger now because of it.

"Obviously with some of the stuff he was doing with my mechanics and what-not just wasn't natural for me."

Stanton isn't playing against Martz or a Martz scheme, which he pointed out. But as far as the Martz modifications that Stanton might have retained, Stanton was blunt: "Not a single one."

Pregame group hug, anyone? Probably not.

Martz hasn't left satisfied quarterbacks everywhere he's been but you'd also think Stanton might feel some level of appreciation. After all, Martz had a big hand in drafting him, second round, for a team headed by Rod Marinelli, a defensive coach, so Martz helped him to something of a payday.

And Martz isn't as negative toward Stanton as the kid is about him.

"Great competitor, smart guy," Martz said. "I know that he's a strong guy that when things break down, he can make plays with his feet. He did so in college; competitive. You watched him come back.

"The thing that impressed us in college was his ability to come back and make big plays to win big games. That's the job of a quarterback is to get that team in the end zone to win. He's got that about him. He's got that quality."

Strange comment

Not sure Mike Martz meant it this way, but comments the OC made Wednesday could be construed as citing himself as a chief reason why it has took about a half-season for the Bears to have a consistent stretch of quality offensive performances with Jay Cutler.

Cutler just put up the best single-game passer rating of his career, threw 4 TD passes without an interception, and was rewarded with an NFC offensive player of the week award. Martz, more than supportive ever since his hiring, gave his quarterback another pat on the head but did it in a fashion that ... well, you decide.

"When he is allowed to function, and do the discipline of what he does at that position, he has no idea how good he can really be," Martz said. "He's headed in that direction."

"When he is allowed to function." First blush sounds like a dig at the offensive line (coach Mike Tice?). But the offensive line has not been Cutler's biggest problem. Just musing here, but I'd put the offensive line at No. 3 behind Martz and Cutler himself as the ranking of things that have not allowed Cutler "to function."

As I noted in a previous entry here, at this point of 2009, Cutler had just thrown his third interception to a defensive lineman. Those were not the fault of Ron Turner or anyone else. If Cutler throws balls to giant men who are looking at him, no scheme or coordinator or offensive line is going to allow him to function. Period.

Or look at it this way:

Forget yardage totals for a moment. The 4-0 run in November is the first time the Bears have scored more than 21 points in three of four games with Cutler as their quarterback. Notably, the yardage totals bordered on the pedestrian: twice under 285 yards, and 360 and 349 in the other two.

The offense has had four straight games of 100-plus yards. That hadn't happened in the almost season-and-a-half behind Cutler.

The reality is that Martz stopped (since the off week when a change was made in game-planning input) asking a still-molten offensive line to do as many protections it can't execute. The group got Roberto Garza back at right guard, the line was allowed to smack defensive lines in the chops, and ...

Voila!

Cutler was allowed to function. Indirectly, or directly for that matter, it is Martz who has truly allowed Cutler to function -- as a quarterback, not just as a passer.

Ironically in the last four games the sack totals have gone up from 1-2-3-4 beginning with Buffalo. But the caliber of defenses also has increased, and Philadelphia's four sacks were all in the first half.

One more thing ...

While it is easy to blame Martz for retarding the growth of Cutler the Quarterback in some respects, it should also be noted to Martz's supreme credit that he has adjusted and may quietly be doing one of the better coaching jobs of his career.

That's right.

He doesn't have Kurt Warner, Marshall Faulk and the Turf Show in their primes, with an Orlando Pace in his prime and Adam Timmerman blocking for them. He's doing this with an offensive line that in fact has struggled through injuries and Nos. 1-2-3 wide receivers who began this season with on average 1.3 years of real experience, plus a tight end who wasn't sure if he fit with the new coordinator, and vice versa.

Martz arguably had to learn to accept what his players couldn't do rather than what they players could do. That's allowed them all, and him to function.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

How Bears are using veteran videos to school rookies on NFL way

How Bears are using veteran videos to school rookies on NFL way

This week marks the end of the beginning, or the beginning of the end, depending on how you want to look at organized team activities (OTA’s), the third stage of the NFL offseason culminating in the mandatory minicamp June 13-15. Teams are allowed a total of 10 OTA sessions, giving coaches a final look at players before the break until training camp convenes in late July.

The sessions also mark the first time that the players, who were finishing college semesters this time a year ago, will be introduced to the REAL NFL, the professionals already part of the August fraternity to which the draft picks and undrafted free agents aspire.

Well, maybe it's not the true first time some of the rookies will “meet” the pros.

During the brief rookie minicamp, offensive line coach Jeremiah Washburn did as all the coaches do: show his position group the film of them going through their drills. In the interest of accelerating the young players’ learning curve, however, Washburn went a step further.

[MORE: Bears QB coach Dave Ragone doesn't mind his type of turnover]

He followed the rookie film with the same drills being run by the pros, meaning the rookies could see how Kyle Long, Charles Leno, Josh Sitton, Cody Whitehair and other vets did those same drills.

The difference was startling – as Washburn intended. The kids were being shown a new meaning for what they might have thought was “maximum effort.”

“That’s one thing coach ‘Wash and coach Ben [Wilkerson] have really been pushing to us — just making sure we’re doing everything to maximum effort, and always finishing near the ball,” said rookie lineman Jordan Morgan. “I feel like that’s stuff you hear at every level of football, but more so now, especially, it being the NFL.”

Rules limit the amount of work allowed vs. opposition, meaning how much Morgan might learn by going against a Leonard Floyd, Eddie Goldman or Pernell McPhee. But learning the every-play intensity at the NFL level may be difficult to comprehend for players who’ve obviously seen it done this hard before.

“The way the veteran guys run [the drills] is the way you’re supposed to do it,” Washburn said. “There’s a style of play, a work ethic you have to put into this. You can’t just get away with things because the guy in front of you is as good or better than you are.

“Scheme-wise, that has not been a problem, the way it has been with some rookies I’ve had in the past. It’s the day-to-day intensity and focus you have to put in for 16 weeks. That is a big adjustment.”

The NFL is replete with examples of college players arriving with elite physical abilities but not taking effort and learning intensity to the professional level. The Bears used the No. 8 overall pick of the 2001 draft on wide receiver David Terrell, who’d dominated on raw ability at the college level but never developed beyond a mid-level wideout.

Washburn saw something similar while coaching offensive line for the Detroit Lions.

“I had a rookie guard in Detroit who ate Hot Pockets and played video games at night,” Washburn recalled. “His rookie year he got by, played OK, but then had a big slump his sophomore year and said, ‘I gotta change my ways.’

“He absolutely changed everything and now he’s an absolute pro.”

If Bears rookies do anything video with their nights, Washburn intends for those videos to be the ways the pros do it

Why Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh will be 'pulling hard' for the Bears this season

Why Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh will be 'pulling hard' for the Bears this season

Jim Harbaugh is a former Chicago Bear, but that's not the main reason why he'll be rooting for the Monsters of the Midway this fall.

Harbaugh, the current Michigan head coach and former head coach of the San Francisco 49ers, used to coach alongside current Bears assistants Vic Fangio and Ed Donatell in the Bay Area.

Fangio, the Bears' defensive coordiantor, and Donatell, the Bears' defensive backs coach, held those same positions for all four of Harbaugh's seasons leading the Niners.

[BEARS TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

Harbaugh voiced his support for his former assistants Monday, speaking with CSN's Pat Boyle at the Golf.Give.Gala golf outing in St. Charles.

"I know (the Bears) are going to have a heck of a defense," Harbaugh said. "Because I know they've got Vic Fangio and Ed Donatell and a tremendous coaching staff. So I'll be pulling hard for them."

Harbaugh also was asked about new Bears quarterback Mike Glennon, and you can hear his comments in the video above, as well as comments from Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer on another new Bears quarterback, Mitch Trubisky.