Mullin's 2011 draft capsules: Defensive line

Mullin's 2011 draft capsules: Defensive line

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
Posted: 10:39 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Fifth in a series

The Bears defensive line got two major talent infusions in 2010. One was the signing of Julius Peppers to the largest contract in franchise history. The second was the emergence of Israel Idonije, who was allowed to settle in at defensive end and produced eight sacks, matching his total for the first six years of his career.

But the pass rush was not at the level that coach Lovie Smith and coordinator Rod Marinelli wanted and something will be done. The question is whether or not the Bears can afford to wait for some form of free agency or do they need to address needs in the draft.
The Bears

Peppers and Idonije have the edges secured and 2010 fourth-rounder Corey Wootton is first-alternate after a quiet rookie season. There is always room for another edge rusher, and Idonije and Peppers are both 30-plus, but the Bears can win with their current ends.

Tackle is another matter. Tommie Harris Chicago career effectively ended several years ago and ended officially this offseason with his release. Henry Melton was a bright light that came on throughout the year, he is now above 290 pounds, and coaches believe he can be Harris replacement at the three-technique.

Anthony Adams in an unrestricted free agent but expected back once a signing period opens, and 2008 third-rounder Marcus Harrison is getting a last chance inside. Matt Toeaina played well enough to take Harris job and receive a contract extension but not well enough to project as more than quality depth.
Need: Green Bays Cullen Jenkins is expected to be targeted when free agency opens and he would be another 30-something force at tackle. But defensive tackle could well be the Bears first choice in the draft as GM Jerry Angelo is adamant about keeping a strength strong.

The 2011 draft

The draft class is considered one of the best in recent memory on the defensive linemen, so the Bears will have options at No. 29 if they elect to address that side of the ball sooner rather than later.

The trouble for the Bears is that the defensive line depth is at end rather than tackle, and the number of potentially elite interior players is small. What that means is that if the Bears do not move on one of the top few, their chances of finding a true Tommie Harris-type diminish significantly. Temples Muhammed Wilkerson had 9.5 sacks last season and may be the type of player the Bears can find after the first round.

Ends and at least two tackles, probably three, will come off the board early and probably before the Bears are within reach.

The Best Bets:

(Because the Bears emphasis is on defensive tackles, ends are not included in this Neither are Marcell Dareus from Alabama, Nick Fairley from Auburn, considered virtual locks to go within the first 10-15 picks, well before the Bear select.)

1. Corey Liuget, Illinois The Bears would love the draft to fall such that this interior disruptor came within range for them. Its unlikely but Liuget projects as an immediate starter in the Tommie Harris mold.

2. Marvin Austin, North Carolina Austin has moved up on most draft boards as teams look past his 010 suspension for contact with an agent. He has first-round talent and is another fit at the three-technique if he decides to play every down.

3. Stephen Paea, Oregon State Among the strongest DL in this draft and a reasonably productive inside force (6 sacks, 10 TFL in 010).

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears first-month foes already adapting

Bears first-month foes already adapting

As the Bears check into Bourbonnais, they'll certainly face their own health, roster, and depth chart challenges between now and the Sept. 11 opener in Houston. In fact, they've already been confronted with a thinning of veteran depth on the offensive line, with the retirements of Manny Ramirez and Nate Chandler. Keeping what they still have in good health will be key over the next six weeks. The last thing they want to face is the pre-Week 1 juggling they were forced into a year ago, when the main camp drama concerned Kevin White's health.

Since late last week, three of the Bears' first four opponents have been either forced to, or have chosen to, adapt on the fly before they were even settled into their dorms.

The big one, of course, involves that first foe, the Texans. As much as we probably shouldn't put anything past J.J. Watt that's physical in nature, it's hard to believe he'll be ready for the Bears after back surgery last week. And even if he somehow is, they'll likely catch a break in that he won't be in three-time Defensive Player of the Year shape.

[SHOP: Gear up for the 2016 season, Bears fans!]

On a lesser scale, when the Bears travel back to Texas two weeks later to take on the Cowboys, Rod Marinelli won't have last year's second-round pick Randy Gregory at his disposal after the former Nebraska standout entered a substance abuse rehab facility today and will be slapped with a 10-game suspension. Granted, Gregory didn't do much last year as a rookie and was going to miss that game anyway due to a previous violation. But his latest incident puts him on that same waiting list fellow linebacker Rolando McClain is on, and promising third-year defensive end DeMarcus Lawrence will be three-quarters of the way through a season-opening suspension of his own. Poor Rod.

Finally, the first division rival the Bears will see in week four, Detroit, added some skill, toughness, talent, and, yes, "experience" to its offense by reaching terms with free agent Anquan Boldin Tuesday. No, he and Marvin Jones don't make up for Calvin Johnson's retirement, but Boldin is 12th all-time in receptions (1,009) and 17th in career receiving yardage (13,195). He makes the Lions better and more dangerous than they were when the week began.

Join Chris Wednesday at 2 p.m. on Comcast SportsNet when we bring you live coverage of the opening training camp press conference in Bourbonnais of General Manager Ryan Pace and Head Coach John Fox.  You'll also hear from quarterback Jay Cutler as the team checks into Olivet Nazarene University ahead of Thursday morning's opening practice.

John Fox, Bears coaches balancing workload with injury risk as training camp convenes

John Fox, Bears coaches balancing workload with injury risk as training camp convenes

Bears players and coaches have been preparing for 2016 intermittently for the past several months. That said, the 2016 “season” effectively begins on Thursday with the Bears holding their first practice of training camp, one that will be open to the public even though players will work the first two days without pads.

From now until early next year, the Bears will have no more than one day off at a time, save the off-week leading up to no game on Nov. 6, and other than perhaps a bonus day off here and there, such as after the Thursday, Oct. 20 night game at Green Bay, after which coach John Fox may grant his team a couple added days off, depending on the performance in Green Bay.

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]

Pads come on for the first time since last Jan. 3 against the Detroit Lions as of Saturday’s practice. Thus begins the ongoing balancing act for coaches to maximize the amount of productive time within the parameters allowed under the collective bargaining agreement, all in the context of heat and conditions of contact.

“You’ve got to get your team ready for battle and you’ve got to make sure you’ve got guys ready to go to battle with,” Fox said. “So it’s a fine line, getting ready for football.”

The Bears already have had offseason injuries to guard Ted Larsen and wide receiver Marquess Wilson, in addition to a strained hamstring for rookie running back Jordan Howard and veterans like Pernell McPhee (knee) coming off surgery.

“It’s a combative game and injuries are part of it,” Fox said. “You’ve got to have some good fortune, and some good practice habits. That way you’re getting better and more physical, yet not to the point where you’re losing guys. Obviously with the reduction of our offseason and the things we used to do as coaches, I don’t think doing less of that is the right idea.”

[RELATED: Going to Bears Training Camp ’16 in Bourbonnais? Remember these four tips]

Training camp this year includes one of the shortest off-site stretches ever, with 10 sessions at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais and one at Soldier Field on Sat. Aug. 6.

Day, Date, Practice Time (CT)

Wednesday, July 27: Report day

Thursday, July 28: 9:35 a.m. practice (no pads)

Friday, July 29: 11:15 a.m. practice (no pads)

Saturday, July 30: 9:35 a.m. practice

Sunday, July 31: 11:15 a.m. practice

AUGUST

Day, Date, Practice Time (CT)

Monday, Aug. 1: 9:35 a.m. practice

Tuesday, Aug. 2: Off day

Wednesday, Aug. 3: 11:15 a.m. practice

Thursday, Aug. 4: 9:35 a.m. practice

Friday, Aug. 5: 11:15 a.m. practice

Saturday, Aug. 6: 12:30 p.m. Meijer Chicago Bears Family Fest (Soldier Field)

Sunday, Aug.7: Off day

Monday, Aug. 8: 11:15 a.m. practice

Tuesday, Aug. 9: 9:35 a.m. practice/final open practice

Wednesday, Aug. 10: Off day

Preseason Schedule:

Thursday, Aug. 11: Bears vs. Denver Broncos, 7 p.m.

Thursday,  Aug. 18: Bears at New England Patriots, 7 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 27: Bears vs. Kansas City Chiefs, 12 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 1: Bears at Cleveland Browns, 7 p.m.

Going to Bears Training Camp ’16 in Bourbonnais? Remember these four tips

Going to Bears Training Camp ’16 in Bourbonnais? Remember these four tips

After covering some 25 Bears training camps spanning both Bourbonnais and Platteville, this CSNChicago.com reporter has gleaned some tips for getting the most out of the fan experience:

Appreciate the effort:

A lot of the young men you’ll be watching are living playing to realize a dream they’ve had since they were as young as some of the youngest fans. They are competing for jobs every day, every snap, and even going against teammates, the effort expended is worthy of the utmost respect. A guarantee: You WILL see something spectacular, whether from a star or some young hopeful who will leave it all and then some on that practice field. Enjoy the moment.

Be polite:

If you want autographs from players, your chances improve with a little courtesy. “Hey, Cutler…” and waving a pen and program at the Bears quarterback does not play nearly as well as “Jay, Jay…” or, if you’re a young fan and really want to stand out, “Mr. Cutler, Mr. Cutler…” Players don’t always get to hear a lot of “polite.” It doesn’t guarantee a signing, but understand that there’s no way players can sign every request and still have fully functioning limbs. And if a player doesn’t stop to sign, it’s not a snub. Most players sign every other day, so this just might be their off day for signing.

Plus, if it’s post-practice, remember that these players have just gone through at least two hours of beyond-max-effort work, wearing equipment that is anything but air-conditioned and weighs as much as a small child, and getting off their feet is a necessary survival skill.

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Go early:

The folks at Olivet Nazarene University do a truly amazing job of crowd and traffic control, but depending on the size of the crush, particularly on peak days, you may miss some field time getting into the parking lots if you’re getting there close to the start of practice. For another thing, players are typically on the field well ahead of the scheduled start times for practice, so you’ll be seeing players working and getting loosened up if you’re there early.

Understand the cadence and order:

Practices are not continuous scrimmaging and hitting. For one thing, that’s physically not possible, or smart. The Bears have individual sessions, then depending on the day, may come together for a “live” run scrimmage without receivers, followed by a less intense session, maybe some special teams, before or after very live pass-protection and receiver-DB head-to-heads, a break, then finishing with 11-on-11 “team” sessions.