Mullin's 2011 draft capsules: Offensive line

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Mullin's 2011 draft capsules: Offensive line

Thursday, April 28, 2011Posted: 12:00 AM

by John Mullin
CSNChicago.com
Fourth in a series
The Chicago offensive line took some time to settle in during 2010. New players, new coaches, new scheme, injuries the Bears would like those difficulties to be behind them. But the chances of the same starting five that finished 2010 also beginning 2011 in the same places are remote, and the draft could figure into that.

The Bears

Veteran center Olin Kreutz is a virtual lock to return after a free-agent offseason that may never completely get started, given the labor difficulties. The closer the regular season gets, the more the Bears need Kreutzs veteran presence in the middle and the less a new team will be inclined to bring in a 34-year-old from another offense.

Roberto Garza still works at right guard and amply proved his value (again) last season following lost time with a knee injury.

JMarcus Webb is virtually a lock as a starting tackle but right or left is undecided and could hinge on what is acquired via the draft. The Chris Williams Experience at guard appears over based on neither Jerry Angelo nor Lovie Smith committing to where Williams will play after seeing him most of last season at guard. Williams best NFL play arguably came at right tackle in the waning games of 2009 and his future is more likely outside rather than inside.

Frank Omiyale, who filled in at left tackle after Williams was injured early last season and held onto the job, did not secure the position and may be out of the starting lineup altogether after starting at three positions in two years.

There is some depth in the form of Lance Louis and Edwin Williams but neither held onto starting jobs when they had them last year.

Need: Perhaps the single biggest need area overall, both because of quality and quantity. The organization has invested little draft capital on the offensive line, relying heavily on free agency through the past decade. That must change starting at the end of this month.

The 2011 draft

The draft potentially lines up very well for the Bears to address the offensive line, particularly in the first round. The 2011 draft class is considered spectacularly deep at defensive end, a position the Bears will always strengthen with a pass rusher. But with as many as 15 first-round talents on the defensive line, the Bears may benefit from one or two quality offensive linemen being on the board when their turn comes at No. 29.

Its pretty good for interior offensive linemen, said ESPNs Mike Mayock, and you dont have to get them in the first round.

But can you get them late in the second round? That is a decision that could face the Bears, who also want to fortify defensive tackle. And if the Bears do choose to wait, or trade down out of round one, it is decidedly unclear whether the talent is such that immediate impact can come below round one.

That said, a rookie starter on the offensive line has traditionally been the exception rather than the rule, Pittsburgh Pro Bowl center Maurkice Pouncey notwithstanding. Pounceys brother Mike is in the upcoming draft but chances of him lasting until No. 29 are virtually non-existent.

The Best Bets:

(In the interest of relevance, because tackles Tyron Smith and Anthony Castonzo, and Mike Pouncey are expected to be gone, CSNChicago.coms ranking picks up after those three)

1. Gabe Carimi, Wisconsin He declared himself the best offensive linemen in this years draft, so swagger wont be a problem. The Bears paid close attention to him during the Badgers Pro Day but he is likely gone by No. 29.
2. Nate Solder, Colorado Like Carimi, Solder is a tackle and his landing in Chicago could send Chris Williams back inside to compete for playing time. A huge figure potentially in the Big Cat Williams tradition.

3. Danny Watkins, Baylor Perhaps the best true guard in the class. Watkins is a former firefighter so he comes into the NFL a few years later than ideal, but he is a physical, instant-starter type inside. Watkins or Georgias Clint Boling would settle the Bears left guard issue.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears make it official, announce signing of quarterback Mark Sanchez

Bears make it official, announce signing of quarterback Mark Sanchez

The Bears made things official Friday morning, announcing the signing of free-agent quarterback Mark Sanchez.

Sanchez has been much maligned since he was selected by the New York Jets with the fifth-overall pick in the 2009 draft.

In eight seasons — four with the New York Jets, two with the Philadelphia Eagles and one with the Dallas Cowboys — he's started 72 of the 77 games he's played in, completing 56.7 percent of his passes for 15,219 yards and 86 touchdowns compared to 86 interceptions.

[BEARS TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

He went to the playoffs in each of his first two seasons, reaching the AFC Championship Game with the Jets in both 2009 and 2010. In six career playoff games, he completed 60.5 percent of his throws for 1,155 yards, nine touchdowns and three interceptions.

Sanchez, the USC product, played in just two games as a backup with the Cowboys last season, completing 10 of his 18 passing attempts for 93 yards.

Sanchez joins a reshaped Bears quarterback group that added Mike Glennon as an expected starter earlier this offseason.

Bears adding Mark Sanchez shouldn't come as a surprise

Bears adding Mark Sanchez shouldn't come as a surprise

The Bears went into the 2017 offseason with a clear plan to make changes, presumably positive ones, at the quarterback position. The idea was and always is to improve the quality of players at this or any position.
 
With the Bears agreeing to terms with former Jet/Eagle/Bronco/Cowboy Mark Sanchez, as first reported by NFL.com's Ian Rapaport, GM Ryan Pace and the organization are addressing the quantity aspect of the position, if not necessarily the quality. And that should not be dismissed.
 
Sanchez fits the template of a Brian Griese, Jason Campbell and even Josh McCown, veterans with less than auspicious resumes' but with more a David Fales or Caleb Hanie had brought to previous rosters. He gives the Bears a third quarterback under contract; expect another to be added before training camp, most likely through the draft next month.

[VIVID SEATS: Get your Bears tickets right here!]
 
It really does not matter that Sanchez, the No. 5 overall pick of the 2009 draft, could not beat out Trevor Siemian in Denver two years ago or Dak Prescott in Dallas last season (while Prescott was still an unknown backup to Tony Romo). The Bears before Thursday had just Mike Glennon and Connor Shaw under contract, and teams typically go into training camps with four passers, if for no other reason than to have arms to spread drill work around.
 
But Sanchez, whose career began with trips to the AFC Championship game his first two seasons in the NFL, represents the kind of backup that teams crave, irrespective of any journeyman status they might have. Sanchez is 30, whose teams have gone 37-35 in his starts, and has experienced winning, albeit less and less as his career has played out.
 
Not that the comparison is particularly notable, but Mark Sanchez or Matt Barkley? If Sanchez somehow surprises perhaps even himself and challenges Glennon, the Bears and Glennon are the better for it.