Tinoisamoa out 3rd straight game, Roach to start

Tinoisamoa out 3rd straight game, Roach to start

Friday, Dec. 3, 2010
2:26 PM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

The Bears will be without Pisa Tinoisamoa for a third straight game after the veteran strong-side linebacker was unable to practice fully on Friday. In his place, former Northwestern star Nick Roach will start.

Coach Lovie Smith had indicated Tinoisamoa be back but he didnt come around as much as wed hoped, Smith said. Tinoisamoa missed most of last season with two knee injuries and the Bears hope to have him for the finishing stretch of 2010.

The falloff from starter to backup is virtually nil between Tinoisamoa and Roach. Indeed, including the last two games of 09, the Bears have won Roachs last four starts at Sam backer, including a shutout in Miami and wins over Michael Vick and Brett Favre (09) when the latter was deep into his statement season.

Roach has been active for every game except Dallas this year so it hasnt been a difficult year for me, he said. Ive been healthy except for a minor knee injury in training camp so I count that as a plus, being able to play in every game.

The Detroit Lions, however, are likely to be without defensive end Kyle Vanden Bosch, who missed his fourth day of practice with a neck injury. The Lions already lost kicker Jason Hanson for the season with a knee injury and are without their 1-2 quarterbacks in Matthew Stafford and Shaun Hill.

Sad note, but somehow not

The passing of Cubs legend Ron Santo at age 70 from bladder cancer is one of those things that gives rise to thoughts and recollections, snapshots really, and in Ronnies case, theyre all good.

Forget what Ronnie was or wasnt as a broadcaster at the end of his career. Ron just enjoyed (unless it was Bad Cubs) the game and being at the game and if you couldnt just appreciate the emotion, that was always, to me, your loss. He got it. A good groan now and then? Hey, weve all heard worse over the airwaves.

I remember back in his playing days when his Park Ridge pizza place gave free pizzas if you were in the shop when he hit a homer. Sometimes the folks there didnt stop giving free stuff if the Cubs won, and Ronnie never minded.

Later he opened a place in downtown Park Ridge. Nice food, nice setting, nice people. Like most restaurants, it eventually went away. But Ronnie was there a lot of the time and always had time for folks, coming over to a table where my parents might be sitting and visiting.

Ronnie never big-timed people, and thats really the best measure of someone. Its always amused me when its said of an individual, Oh, really, hes nice once you get to know him. Heck, arent we pretty much all nice to people we know (except the jerks)? Ron Santo was nice to nobodies, to people who werent Hall of Fame voters, to just folks.

Too soon gone, Ronnie. Too soon. Thanks for the pleasant times. And the pizza. It was great.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Eddie Jackson healthy, ready to bring center fielder range to Bears' secondary

Eddie Jackson healthy, ready to bring center fielder range to Bears' secondary

Eddie Jackson’s senior year at Alabama was cut short by a broken leg, but the Bears’ fourth-round pick doesn’t expect that injury to affect him in 2017. 

Jackson suffered his injury Oct. 22 returning a punt against Tennessee and missed the rest of Alabama’s season. 

“I’m just ready to get there and work with the training staff at the Bears,” Jackson said. “I know I’m gonna be ready for training camp 100 percent, no limitations.”

When healthy, Jackson was an electric playmaker — nine interceptions, 12 pass breakups and five total touchdowns — who worked initially as a cornerback and later as a safety at Alabama. Two of those scores came in 2016 as a punt returner, a position where he could make an immediate impact for the Bears.

“(The Bears) told me they liked me as a returner,” Jackson, who averaged 23 yards per punt return, said. “That’s one of the things they want to try me at, or see how well I do. All I’ve got to say is I’m just ready to come in and compete and work. You know, take advantage of every opportunity that’s given to me right now.”

Jackson moreso fits a Bears need as a rangy free safety, though he wasn’t a sure tackler with 16 missed tackles in 122 attempts from 2014-2016, according to Pro Football Focus. In addition to those nine interceptions (six of which came in his junior year), Jackson broke up 12 passes in four years, and in 2016, he limited opposing quarterbacks to a 38.3 passer rating when they threw his way. 

And Jackson turned three of his interceptions into touchdowns. For some context: Malik Hooker, the Colts’ 15th overall pick who was regarded as the best “center fielder” safety prospect this year, had three touchdowns on seven college interceptions. 

“When I get the ball, I feel like I turn into a receiver,” Jackson said. “It’s my mindset. I don’t think about going out of bounds, or think about going down, I think about touchdowns.”

The Bears only intercepted eight passes as a team last year, a void the team began to address with the signing of Quintin Demps (six interceptions in 2016) in March. Jackson will push Adrian Amos, who doesn’t have an interception in over 1,800 career plays. 

“I just feel like wherever I’m needed I can do it all,” Jackson said. “I’ll have good coaching they can teach me what I need to be taught and they talked to me about playing safety and special teams. I’m just looking forward to come out there and earn a spot and hopefully take us to a Super Bowl. It’s possible.”

Is Bears' fourth-round pick Tarik Cohen a smaller Tyreek Hill or a Darren Sproles comp?

Is Bears' fourth-round pick Tarik Cohen a smaller Tyreek Hill or a Darren Sproles comp?

"The Human Joystick" nickname came from game action YouTube videos. But Tarik Cohen really got on the map for those who weren't aware of his on-field exploits through his acrobatic Instagram videos, including catching footballs simultaneously with each hand as he completes a backflip.

"It started because I had seen someone else do it. And we were bored after summer conditioning and decided to go out and try it," Cohen told reporters at Halas Hall Saturday afternoon. "The first two times (with one football, one hand) I failed, but the third time I got it pretty naturally. Then I was competing with someone else at a different school and he had done it too. So then I had to one up myself because everyone was asking what was next. So then I did it with two. Social media got ahold of that and things went crazy." 

As for the nickname?

"I really prefer ... Someone on ESPN had called me "Chicken Salad" and I really liked that," Cohen said. "I don't think it's bad. "Human Joystick," I like it too."

Chicken Salad?

"I don't know, I've never heard anybody called that, I wanted to be the one of one," Cohen said.

[MORE: Bears select Alabama safety Eddie Jackson in the fourth round]

Cohen became Ryan Pace's second fourth-round pick on Saturday (No. 119) with a vision of becoming the running game's change of pace to last year's Pro Bowl fifth-round surprise Jordan Howard. In four years at North Carolina A&T, the 5-foot-6, 179 lb. waterbug piled up a MEAC-record 5,619 rushing yards and 61 touchdowns. Cohen notched 18 of those scores as a senior, including four of 83 yards or more. He had the fastest 10-yard split as part of his 4.42, 40-yard dash at the Scouting Combine.

"I was really disappointed with my 40 time because I wanted to run a sub 4.40 and I stumbled on the first one and it seems the second is always slower than the first," Cohen said.

Last season, Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Tyreek Hill became the all-purpose headache for Chiefs opponents, especially in space, with six receiving touchdowns, three rushing and three more on returns. Cohen is four inches shorter than Hill and doesn't return kicks, but size wise is a comp for Darren Sproles, who was also a fourth-round pick by the Chargers in 2005, but all three of his Pro Bowl appearances have come in the last three seasons.  The physical stature in Sproles has seemed to be a bigger issue for opponents than the player himself, missing only eight games in his career.

"I think it'll play a key role and benefit me," Cohen told us. "The linemen are going to be bigger and it'll be really hard for defenders to see behind my linemen.

"I didn't want to necessarily be bigger (growing up), but I wanted to beat the bigger kids."

Did he?

"Oh yeah, definitely. I've got that chip on my shoulder and when I went against the bigger kids I felt I had something to prove so I always go harder."

Now he'll face the biggest of them all with the Bears.