Trouble out wide for Bears

609696.png

Trouble out wide for Bears

No Jay Cutler. No Matt Forte. Now no Johnny Knox.

Wide receiver Johnny Knox was undergoing back surgery on Monday following the nightmarish hit he took in Sundays loss to the Seattle Seahawks. The hope is for a full recovery that will give Knox a chance of returning to his game, but more importantly, also to a pain-free life after a horrible injury.

On a completely different level, the Bears suddenly are facing desperate game situations needing to win by running the ball but without the full presence of their two speed receivers to create at least the threat of a deep throw now and then.

Knox was leading the Bears in receptions (37) at the time of his injury after leading them in receiving yardage last season. His gaudy 19.8-yard average per reception ranked among the NFLs best.

Now he is gone for the year and Devin Hester, the other outside speed opposite Knox, is still fighting through ankle and other minor injuries. Hester caught zero passes Sunday, wasnt targeted on any throws, and has zero receptions in five of the Bears last six games, and just one in the Philadelphia game before that span.

Meaning: The Bears primary receivers right now are Earl Bennett, Dane Sanzenbacher and Roy Williams, with a combined 4 receptions Sunday.

Ominously perhaps, Williams is still having communications problems with Bears quarterbacks, and now there may be a different one throwing to him. Williams misconnected with Caleb Hanie and the result was a 42-yard interception return for a touchdown by cornerback Brandon Browner in the fourth quarter.

That may have been Hanies last pass as a Bear.

Josh McCown replaced Hanie on the next series, only to see his second pass attempt, toward Williams, also be intercepted.

The Browner INT is on me, Williams said. Thats my fault. Dont put it on the quarterback; put it on me. It was a great play by the defender.

Bennett averages 15 yards per catch with a long of 34 this season. Sanzenbacher less than 10 yards per reception, none longer than 18 yards. Williams has no catch longer than 25 yards in 2011.

Weve lost some of our firepower out there, coach Lovie Smith acknowledged. Devin, best returner in the history of the game, knows how to make you miss and stretch the field. Johnny has had that role for us.

So we are missing those guys. But when youre down a few players you have to adjust what you do and find other ways to move down the field. You dont have to do it vertical always and thats what we have to do.

2017 NFL Draft Profile: California QB Davis Webb

2017 NFL Draft Profile: California QB Davis Webb

As part of our coverage leading up to the 2017 NFL Draft we will provide profiles of more than 100 prospects, including a scouting report and video interviews with each player.

Davis Webb, QB, California

6'5" | 229 lbs.

2016 stats:

4,295 YDS, 61.6 CMP%, 37 TD, 12 INT, 135.6 QBR

Projection:

Day 3

Scouting Report:

"System quarterback with more than 65 percent of his attempts coming inside of 10 yards. Webb has enough raw talent to be considered a developmental prospect, but his decision-making and accuracy issues beyond 10 yards is a big red flag that might be tough to overcome in the NFL." — Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Video analysis provided by Rotoworld and NBC Sports NFL Draft expert Josh Norris.

Click here for more NFL Draft Profiles

Owners to consider on and off field changes this week during NFL meetings

Owners to consider on and off field changes this week during NFL meetings

Give the NFL credit for, at least this one time, genuinely putting the interests of its fans first. Or at least proposing to.

Among the matters expected to come before this week’s owners meetings in Arizona will be one from Washington that coaches have the ability to make unlimited replay challenges as long as the ones they make are correct. The idea is not likely to pass, in part because the NFL is endeavoring to improve the pace of its games, particularly for fans seated in stadiums, particularly outdoor ones. (If you’re watching at home, replay reviews are enough time to fill the chips bowl and grab a cold one.)

Along that line, the plan is for tablet computers to be run out to game officials for their review and consultation, while the final decision is reached at league officiating headquarters in New York, according to current proposals to be considered for votes this week. Additionally, a 40-second play clock is suggested after extra points when there is no commercial break scheduled, and halftime to be limited to 13 minutes 30 seconds.

[VIVID SEATS: Get your Bears tickets right here!]

Actual in-game changes are also under consideration.

No one is likely to label it “The McClellin Rule” but a proposal is there to ban players leaping over offensive linemen (read: long snappers) to block field goals and extra points. Former Bears linebacker Shea, as a special-teams rusher with the New England Patriots, successfully vaulted Ravens blockers to knock down a Baltimore field goal try last season.

The proposal is likely to pass ostensibly as a player-safety measure, although cynics might suggest that the impetus behind the ban is general irritation that Bill Belichick’s group came up with with kick-block gambit.

More directly aimed at protecting players from gratuitous violence in a game that has enough violence just by its nature is a move to remind officials that players can be ejected for egregiously illegal hits. The situation is not considered dire because of frequency but the league clearly wants to send a message/reminder to not only officials, but players, something likely to be reinforced during officials’ tours of training camps in August.