View from the Moon: A Super Bowl in March?

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View from the Moon: A Super Bowl in March?

Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011
7:18 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

A Super Bowl in March? It could just about happen.

CSNChicago.com spent some time with an NFL player rep talking over some of the dizzying details of the collective bargaining agreement negotiations. The result was a few new perspectives on whats on the table, and what the upshot could be.

One was simple calendar math and the Super Bowl. If the 18-game season being sought by the NFL owners comes to be, you add two weeks to the season for those games. Fold in a second in-season off week and now youre adding three weeks. Owners are offering Labor Day plus the second off-week, but thats pretty much what the players already have most years.

The 2010 Super Bowl was played Feb. 6. Last seasons was on Feb. 7. Add three weeks to that and you are just about into March.

What also happens is that offseason programs usually begin in March, meaning that recovery time, whether from offseason surgeries or just general healing, loses almost a month.

A nasty domino chain.

The consensus does seem to still be that nothing will settle by Mar. 4 and probably not until right up against the season itself. The NFL walking out of a negotiating session last week isnt definitive in any respect except that people looking to get something done arent walking out of meetings.

Staff stuff
Offensive line coach Mike Tice was expected to be in play for job openings this offseason after the job he did through the Bears 2010 season. The Tennessee Titans, under new head coach Mike Munchak, have interest in Tice as offensive coordinator, as first reported by the Chicago Tribune on Sunday.

The Bears would need to give permission for Tice to interview, given that he has one year remaining on his Chicago contract and that this is not for a head-coaching job.

This puts the Bears, and Tice, in an interesting situation. Lovie Smith is a supporter of staff getting opportunities, and assistants Chris Tabor (special teams) and Eric Washington (defensive line) already have moved to new gigs.

But Tice is a core member of the current Bears staff and had considerable support to become the Bears offensive coordinator before the decision was made to hire Mike Martz. If the Bears arrow continues to point upward, Tice very likely has a future in Chicago. He was an integral part of the in-season turnaround by the offense and already has considerable clout in game-planning.

Oh, and Munchak was the Titans offensive line coach before Jeff Fisher left this offseason.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Missouri OLB Charles Harris

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Missouri OLB Charles Harris

As part of our coverage leading up to the 2017 NFL Draft we will provide profiles of more than 100 prospects, including a scouting report and video interviews with each player.

Charles Harris, OLB, Missouri

6'3" | 253 lbs.

2016 stats:

61 tackles, 12 TFL, 9 sacks

Projection:

First round

Scouting Report:

"High-cut pass rusher with good athleticism but concerns regarding his ability to drop anchor against the run. Ironically, Harris might be best suited as a penetrator which is something he fought against this season. His hands can be improved as pass rush weapons, but he has agility and footwork that can't be taught. Harris can play on the edge in a 4-3 or 3-4 front and should be the next in a line of early contributing defensive ends coming out of Missouri." — Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Video analysis provided by Rotoworld and NBC Sports NFL Draft expert Josh Norris.

Click here for more NFL Draft Profiles

Ex-Bear Brandon Marshall an early favorite at NFL owners meetings

Ex-Bear Brandon Marshall an early favorite at NFL owners meetings

PHOENIX – Brandon Marshall never needed a whole lot of encouragement to step before a microphone but the NFL, which sometimes wished he'd put a sock in it, has now invited the former Bears wide receiver to speak up.
 
The NFL extended an invitation for Marshall, whose time in Chicago ended in some measure because of his insistence on pursuing the media portion of his career, to address the league higher-up's ostensibly as part of a communications bridge-building. Marshall jumped at the chance.
 
"They thought it was important for a player to come up and give a player's perspective and talk about the relationship between owners and players," Marshall said on Monday at the outset of the NFL owners meetings. "I think it's evident that our relationship could be so much better."
 
Marshall has been part of Showtime's "Inside the NFL" in recent years, flying to New York to participate in taping the show, and ultimately accepting a trade from the Bears to the Jets in 2015, which obviously cut down on his commute. The Jets released Marshall earlier this month, after which Marshall signed on with the Giants.
 
He told owners this week, "If we want our game to continue to be on that [positive] track, that it's on being super successful and being a pillar in our community and being a thread in our community, we have to make sure our relationship as players and owners is good."

[VIVID SEATS: Get your Bears tickets right here!]
 
The immediate response was more than a little positive: Per San Francisco 49ers owner Jed York:

https://twitter.com/JedYork/status/846400103472480256
 
Marshall predictably welcomed the forum and wants to see it expanded.

"I'd like to see more players be more involved in our owners meetings," Marshall said. "And not only at the owners meetings, but any time we're talking football, we should have players at the table. Commissioner Goodell is always open-minded. He always has that open-door policy. So I think he'll continue to listen and continue to evolve this part of our business."