Will Cutler continue Monday night 'magic?'

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Will Cutler continue Monday night 'magic?'

Time for a few night moves from Jay Cutler. That hasnt always been easy for the Bears quarterback to accomplish.

The Bears have lost all four of their Sunday night games behind Cutler in addition to a Thursday Night Football debacle in San Francisco when Cutler threw five interceptions. A win at Miami last year stands as the lonely W but in none of those six night games did Cutler post a passer rating higher than 79.6 and three were below 50.

Given that the Bears have two Sunday night NFC North games scheduled at this point (Oct. 16 vs. Minnesota, Dec. 25 at Green Bay), this Sabbath issue needs to be worked out in the interest of division chances.

But the Detroit Lions are a Monday night situation, an altogether different Cutler story.

Monday magic

The Bears have won all three of their Monday Night Football appearances with Cutler and the lowest passer rating of the three was an 82.5 against the Green Bay Packers last season. His other two MNFs were at the expense of the Minnesota Vikings with ratings of 108.4 and 106.6.

What Cutler has inexplicably been able to do on Bears Monday nights has been to deliver impact throws. In the three MNF games Cutler has thrown eight touchdown passes vs. three interceptions.

Accordingly, the Bears have averaged 32 points per Monday night Cutler game.

Reasons for Cutlers erratic night play have included speculation that his diabetes leaves him run down or vision-impaired later in days. But the sometimes-spectacular play on Monday nights make clear conclusions impossible.

A conclusion that is very possible to make, however, is that Cutler needs to improve significantly and immediately.

His passer rating has slid from a 107.8 in the opener vs. Atlanta to 46.7 against the secondary-challenged Carolina Panthers in a game when he was sacked only once and had a ground game piling up 224 yards. Cutler ranks 26th in the NFL for passer rating (77.8), right below Rex Grossman and ahead of only rookies Andy Dalton and Blaine Gabbert plus Sam Bradford, Mark Sanchez, Matt Cassel and Kerry Collins. His 54.2 completion percentage ranks 28th.

You look at our offense right now and we need to get more from our passing game, coach Lovie Smith said. We got more from our run game last week. I'm pleased with how we're protecting the football and some of those things like that, but there will come a time when we have to do a better job passing the ball, and we will. Hopefully it will be this week.

Lining up
Bears coaches typically do not divulge decisions on personnel until late on game days. So not surprisingly, coach Mike Tice hasn't identified his starters at right guard and tackle.

But decisions are virtually always made on the basis of winning this game. And before running through a glowing assessment of Lance Louis performance at right tackle, Tice offered one of the most critical takes in recent memory with respect to tackle Frank Omiyale.

Tice indicated that with Omiyale the goal is simply to avoid being horrendous.

When you have some bad plays, you cant compound those with other bad plays, Tice said. You try to minimize the number of bad plays you have in succession. Thats what were trying to do with Frank; were trying to keep his bad plays to sporadic as opposed to back to back.

Louis has been at right guard all season before the shuffling last Sunday from right guard (for injured Chris Spencer) to right tackle (for an inept Omiyale) to short-yardage tight end (next to Omiyale). That is Louis preferred position and indications point to that only occurring if Spencers fractured hand cannot stand the rigors of practice this week.

Spencer practiced on a limited basis Thursday with his right hand in a plastic castsplint. If he can go, the negative review of Omiyale point to Louis going to right tackle, a position he played in college.

The linemen have to go where its best for us, said Tice, noting that Louis put 10 Panthers on the ground over his 41 plays. That might mean a player not playing in the spot where hes most comfortable but where it helps us the most.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Tennessee OLB Derek Barnett

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Tennessee OLB Derek Barnett

As part of our coverage leading up to the 2017 NFL Draft we will provide profiles of more than 100 prospects, including a scouting report and video interviews with each player.

Derek Barnett, OLB, Tennessee

6'3" | 259 lbs.

2016 stats:

56 tackles, 19 TFL, 13 sacks, INT, 5 PD, 2 FF

Projection:

First round

Scouting Report:

"Strong edge presence with NFL-caliber hand usage and play strength. Barnett is one of the most productive defensive linemen to come out of the SEC in quite some time despite lacking the length and twitch that teams usually look for off the edge. His awareness and play traits should keep him near the action and he has the talent to step into a starting base end spot right away. There could be coordinators who view him as an early down, outside backer in a 3-4 with the ability to put his hand in the ground on sub packages." — Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Video analysis provided by Rotoworld and NBC Sports NFL Draft expert Josh Norris.

Click here for more NFL Draft Profiles

Bears Chairman George McCaskey sets 2017 demands for Ryan Pace, John Fox

Bears Chairman George McCaskey sets 2017 demands for Ryan Pace, John Fox

PHOENIX — When the 2014 season concluded, with all its drama, poor play and internal dysfunction, Bears Chairman George McCaskey passed along the unvarnished mood of Bears matriarch and owner Virginia McCaskey:
 
"She's pissed off," George McCaskey declared.
 
The 2016 season ended worse record-wise (3-13) than 2014 (5-11) but Bears ownership sees arrows pointing up, not down as they appeared after 2014, occasioning the jettisoning of the general manager and coaching staff.
 
"[Virginia] sees the progress, but like any Bears fan, she wants results," George McCaskey said, chuckling at the recollection of relaying his mother's mood. "That's the quote that won't go away."
 
"Progress" and "results" are vague terms, and sometimes relative. But Bears ownership is not setting a public fail-safe point for either general manager Ryan Pace or head coach John Fox to remain in place, although no scenario could presumably consider four wins actual "progress" from three.
 
"We want to continue to see progress, see the building blocks but there isn't any sort of particular threshold," McCaskey confirmed. "We're not on any particular timetable that somebody else is wanting to set for us. We're wanting to see continued progress toward our goal of sustained success."
 
"Sustained success" is not beyond the scope of possibility, assuming that a talent core can be established and includes a quarterback, which the personnel department under Pace believe it is on the brink of putting in place, whether around Mike Glennon, Mark Sanchez or a player to be drafted or traded for later.

[VIVID SEATS: Get your Bears tickets right here!]
 
GM Phil Emery adopted the buzz phrase of "multiple championships," but current leadership does sound less grandiose and more grounded. And where Emery drafts proved disastrous, the Pace administration has had clear hits, injuries notwithstanding, as recently as the 2016 class, which McCaskey mentioned in the context of Pace building the roster exactly the way ownership prefers.
 
"We have confidence in Ryan and John," McCaskey said. "We want to build through the draft. Ryan said that in his interview when he said he was interested in coming to the Bears and we like how he's stuck to that plan. We saw it last year when we had three rookies on the Pro Football Writers of America all-rookie team; Cody Whitehair, Leonard Floyd and Jordan Howard.
 
"And that's what we need to keep doing; keep building through the draft. I told Ryan he should get ripped this time of year every year for not being more active in free agency and that's because we're developing our own guys and rewarding our own guys."
 
McCaskey supported the actions, or lack of same, by Pace in the pursuit of max-dollar free agents this offseason. The Bears dropped out of sweepstakes for cornerback Stephon Gilmore and safety Tony Jefferson, among others, when prices spiked far beyond the parameters set by the Pace staff.
 
"I've been very impressed with [Pace] as a leader, as an evaluator of talent," McCaskey said. "And one of the things I've been most impressed by with him is the discipline he's shown just as recently as this free agency period. He didn't want to overpay guys. Too often, I think, you overpay guys who don't come through for you and then you have a big hole in your salary cap and you're behind the 8-ball. So I like the discipline he has shown, the restraint he has shown in free agency."