5 Questions with... Blackhawks TV analyst Eddie Olczyk

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5 Questions with... Blackhawks TV analyst Eddie Olczyk

CSN Chicago Senior Director of Communications
CSNChicago.com Contributor

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the citys most popular personalities on the spot with everyones favorite local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

On Wednesdays, exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weeks guesta Chicago hockey legend who started and ended his brilliant 16-year NHL career for his beloved Blackhawkshes a Stanley Cup champion, a U.S. Olympian, but without question, this guy is THE best television color analyst in the game todayyou can catch him all season long on Comcast SportsNet with his on-air partner Pat Foley, along with regular appearances throughout the season on Versus and the NHL on NBClets drop the puck already, here are 5 Questions withEDDIE OLCZYK!

BIO: Eddie Olczyk is currently in his fifth season as the television analyst for Blackhawks hockey on Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

Olczyk, a 16-year NHL veteran, scored 342 goals and recorded 794 points in 1,031 games with Chicago, Pittsburgh, Toronto, Winnipeg, the New York Rangers and Los Angeles, winning a Stanley Cup with the Rangers in 1994. The third overall choice in the 1984 NHL Entry Draft, he was also a member of the 1984 U.S. Olympic team and represented the U.S. in numerous international competitions.

Eddie began his NHL career as an 18-year old with his hometown Chicago Blackhawks in 1984-85. He played three seasons recording 180 points (65 goals, 115 assists) in 228 games. He then spent three-and-a-half seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs (1987-91), scoring a career-high 42 goals during the 1987-88 season and recording a career-high 90 points during the 1988-89 season.

Olczyk was traded to Winnipeg and played two-and-a-half seasons with the Jets from 1990-1992, recording 142 points (66 goals, 76 points) in 150 games. He played for the Rangers (1992-95) before heading back to Winnipeg, scoring 27 goals with the Jets in their last season in Winnipeg (1995-96). He began the 1996-97 season with Los Angeles before being traded to the Penguins late in the season. Olczyk played parts of two seasons with Pittsburgh before returning to Chicago and finishing his NHL career with the Blackhawks. He retired from the league in 2000.

Following his playing career, Olczyk embarked on a career as a broadcaster, working on Pittsburgh Penguins television broadcasts for Fox Sports Net Pittsburgh (2000-03) and calling games for ESPN, ESPN2 and NHL Radio.

Olczyk was named head coach of the Penguins on June 11, 2003, and he posted a 31-68-14 record while behind the Penguins bench (2003-05).

He returned to broadcasting during the 2005-06 NHL season, serving as an analyst and studio host for Versus and NBC, where he also resides as the networks chief game analyst.

Eddie O., as he is affectionately known, and his wife Diana have four children: sons Eddie, Tommy and Nicholas and daughter Alexandra.

1) CSNChicago.com: Eddie, thanks for taking time to join us for this edition of 5 Questions with With the NHL season finally upon us, theres plenty of positive buzzhigh expectations throughout the hockey world for this seasons Blackhawks team. In your opinion, what would you say would be your top 3 team priorities from an offensiveand defensivestandpoint that must happen in order to propel this well-stocked Blackhawks squad to the top of the Western Conference standings?

Olczyk: I think first off is that they need to get off to a really good start. The first 20 games are crucial for any team, but I think for a team that got off to a tough start last year in the first 20 games, is really the first and foremost as far as a collective standpoint.

I think second is the health of this team right now is probably the biggest question mark because you have some guys banged up. You've got Viktor Stalberg on the mend and Ben Smith banged up. So to me, to really get a true assessment of this club, is that you've got to have everybody healthy in order to have a good first 20 games and have a good start.

Lastly, finding that chemistry as quick as you can, whether it's on the forward lines, on the back end or who even's going to be the backup goalie. Chemistry is something that can come in a lot of different ways, but I think it's something that will help the team down the stretch and into the playoffs.

2) CSNChicago.com: This next question will be tough to answer. Which was a more emotional moment for you personally: when you were drafted first overall by your hometown Blackhawks in the 1984 NHL entry draft (third overall in the entire NHL) or when the Blackhawks won it all two years ago?

Olczyk: (Laughs) Well, considering both of those were something I'd dreamed about as a kid growing up in the city of Chicago: what it would be like to play for the Blackhawks and then skating the Stanley Cup around the old Chicago Stadium. Considering I had nothing to do with what happened two years ago, I was more of a fan than anything else and a proud alum of the Blackhawks organization, it was close. But being drafted by my hometown team and being an American and from the greatest city in the world, there's nothing really that would ever top that moment as a member of the Blackhawks. I got a chance to play my first game as a Blackhawk, my thousandth game as a Blackhawk and my last game as a Blackhawk, with a lot of games in between. So, I would have to say, longwinded, being drafted by my favorite team was a lifelong dream.

3) CSNChicago.com: Through your expert knowledge of the game and natural ability in front of the camera, you have established yourself as the premier color analyst in all of hockey. Tell us how you got your start in broadcasting.

Olczyk: Considering a lot of my friends tell me I have a face for radio, I have no idea what that means, but on the inside, I really do. Actually, I got my start in television during the 1994-95 season. There was a work stoppage and I was playing for the New York Rangers at the time and we didn't play the first four months of the regular season. Everybody who knows me, knows I have a passion for horse racing. I got a chance to work at the Meadowlands Racetrack in East Rutherford, New Jersey. I actually did in-house and race analysis at the Meadowlands Racetrack. So that was kind of my introduction to working in front of the camera, having an IFB, which is an earpiece that you talk to people in the truck to communicate. That's how I pretty much got my start on television, being a racing analyst at the Meadowlands Racetrack in the fall of 1994.

4) CSNChicago.com: Two-parter here: what was your most memorable game as a player and who would you say is the toughest opponent youve ever faced on the ice?

Olczyk: The toughest opponent I ever played against without a doubt was Scott Stevens, who was a longtime NHLer and one of the meanest, toughest defensemen ever to play in the National Hockey League. I just think that he was one of those guys, I mean there are a lot of players you knew were on the ice, but when you talk about tough, he had everything that you would want in a tough, hard-nosed defenseman. There was always a battle each and every night, but just the physical strength that he had was really second to none.

I was lucky enough to win a Stanley Cup with that Rangers in 1994, scoring my first goal in my very first game as a Blackhawk against the Detroit Red Wings probably would be right at the top. However, coming in a close second would be the year we won the Cup with the Rangers in 1994. I was voted the Players' Player Award, which was voted on by my teammates. To win that award, on a team that eventually won the Stanley Cup, is something I will always take great pride in.

5) CSNChicago.com: Now that youre back calling Blackhawks games, were curious what you did for fun during this off-season (excluding going to the race track!)

Olczyk: (Laughs) Well that's not fair considering you won't allow me to answer chasing the ponies around the racetrack! It's a time for me to stay at home and be with my family. Everybody knows my schedule is pretty crazy during the regular season. It's a privilege and honor to sit in the chair that I do for 125 games a year, but I just like staying at home. Both my boys come home from college, so its a full house at the Olczyk household over the course of the summer for about four months. I took a trip to Las Vegas, which my wife and I annually do, so we enjoy doing that. We stay at the beautiful Red Rock Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. I would highly recommend that to any people who might be going west for a vacation in the near future.

Olczyk LINKS:

Chicago Blackhawks official site

Nominate your favorite youth hockey team via CSNChicago.coms Eddie Os All-Stars presented by Galaxie Home Remodeling

(Note: Meghan Bower contributed to this edition of 5 Questions with)

Patience and perseverance: trying to make, and stay in, the NHL

Patience and perseverance: trying to make, and stay in, the NHL

Corey Crawford remembers his early days with the Blackhawks, the times where he was working his tail off in Rockford to get a call-up or hoping he would be the one they would choose to stay out of training camp. The thought would creep into his head: “maybe I never get there.”

“Yeah, I probably shouldn’t tell you that but there were a bunch of times,” Crawford said with a smile. 

Crawford had a lot of good times, a lot of valuable experiences with the IceHogs. But he always kept his eye on the main goal: making the NHL. Twice he’s been named an NHL All-Star. Twice he’s been a winner or shared the William Jennings Trophy. Twice he’s won Stanley Cups. He can look back and smile now at those days when he wasn’t sure if he’d latch onto a team.

Making the NHL is tough. Staying there can be even tougher. The pressures and expectations are enormous, especially the higher you go in the NHL draft. Be it patience, willing to change your game or the need to try over with another organization, players do whatever it takes to get that opportunity.

“The mental side of the game for a lot of these draft choices or these on-the-cusp, on-the-edge players is the hardest part,” Rockford coach Ted Dent said. “The physical aspect, keeping yourself in shape and being a good hockey player isn’t the battle. It’s usually the mental side of things, the expectations, the pressure they put on themselves, maybe their families, their agents or whatever comes with it. It’s a side that gets overlooked a little bit.”

“I did whatever it would take.”

Patrick Sharp spent a few years at the University of Vermont but for him, his career choice was clear: he was going to be a pro hockey player no matter what. Coming up through the Philadelphia Flyers’ system (Sharp was their 95th overall pick in the 2001 draft), finding an opportunity was tough the early 2000s. The Flyers had their goal scorers – John LeClair, Michal Handzus, Mark Recchi, Tony Amonte and Jeremy Roenick were among them. So to get a chance Sharp changed his game and came up as a fourth-line checker.

“I looked at the team I had in Philly – couple of Hall of Famers, a lot of all-stars. I realized that, although I was an AHL all-star and I was putting up points, I probably wasn’t going to do with the Flyers. I had to do what I could to make that team,” Sharp said. “Be more physical, fighting, I did whatever it would take.

“Every player has been a star at some level of their career. That’s why they’re in the situation they’re in,” Sharp said. “Each player has a different path, a different role. It’s important for that player to have communication and find out what they want from him. What’s going to help him get to that next level and apply it? It’s easy at a young age to think, ‘I’ve got a good game.’ It’s not always the case. It’s a 200-foot game, special teams. Communication’s the key.”

Jack Skille had a similar situation. Skille was highly touted coming out of the U.S. National Development Program and the Blackhawks selected him seventh overall in the 2005 draft. He left the University of Wisconsin-Madison early and would later sign an entry-level deal with the Blackhawks. For years, Skille said people tried to tell him he’d need a different game to stay in the NHL, but it took him time to realize that. Now a regular starter for the Vancouver Canucks in more of a checking role, Skille said he’s happy and having fun with the game.

“I think that was the biggest adjustment coming here and in the role I play: [realizing] less is more. It took me a long time, as a young kid, to realize that. It took a lot of mistakes over my career and a lot of growing pains to finally get to the point where I was like, what everyone’s telling me, less is more and they’re right. I finally bought into it and it’s been working,” Skille said. “It’s an adjustment because you’re used to sitting there, being one of the go-to guys and out there every single shift. But there’s something to be said for guys who don’t get frequent shifts out there and keep playing the same way with a lot of energy.”

The sounding board

Dent’s office is in a perfect spot at BMO Harris Center, located between the IceHogs’ locker room and the players’ lounge. From his office, Dent can gauge what mood his players are in, and which ones are down and could use a talk.

This is as much part of a minor-league coach’s job as the coaching itself. The Blackhawks’ organization has a mental skills coach who is sometimes in Rockford but, for the day-to-day, Dent is that guy.

“You try to form that bond and relationship with them. For them to get their feelings off their chest is a big thing because they hold so many feelings in, in a group setting,” Dent said. “You want to be that strong, tough guy like all hockey players. But inside a lot of them have a lot of emotion that needs to get out. You try to be that sounding board for them and let them get some things out one-on-one.”

Crawford had his ears to bend when he was in Rockford – at that time Bill Peters was head coach and Dent was assistant. Crawford said those talks helped but ultimately, it came down to him.

“They’re not going to be there when you go home. They’re not going to make choices for you. You really have to learn that on your own,” Crawford said. “Maybe [you get pep talks] a little bit from your teammates but a lot of those guys, too, were guys I was growing up with and going through all that stuff with. It’s just one of those things where you get a feel for how you’re supposed to think and to battle through things and try to stay positive.”

[SHOP: Gear up, Blackhawks fans!]

“I expected to be in the NHL this year…”

Michael Latta was happy when he was traded to the IceHogs in January. He’s getting more minutes, more opportunity than he was in his short stay with the Ontario Reign, the Los Angeles Kings’ minor-league team. But there’s no doubt Latta, who spent a few seasons with the Washington Capitals, wants another chance at the NHL.

“I expected to be in the NHL this year with LA. I really did. And it didn’t work out,” said Latta, who was selected 72nd overall by the Nashville Predators in 2009. “But I believe I can play in the NHL; I can be a factor in the NHL. So I’m really hoping I can get a chance up there just to show [the Blackhawks] what I can do. They don’t know me very well so it’d be nice to go up there and get a shot. Just get a chance to show them and see what they think.”

At the same time, Latta wants to play as much as possible. For bubble guys like him, that doesn’t always happen in the NHL. In Rockford he’s playing a lot of minutes, getting a lot of opportunities, and he’s taking advantage of it.

“I’d played eight minutes a night, which is fine. You’re living the dream, playing in the NHL. But I was excited to come down and get my scoring touch back, get some ice time, some power play time,” Latta said. “To come here and get it and start playing, it’s been special. It’s been a lot of fun. I’m just really enjoying it again. Hockey’s fun again.”

It’s not easy to make the NHL but the opportunity is worth it for many. For those trying to latch on, or latch on again, the work continues. For those who made it, there’s the appreciation for what it took to get here.

“Every experience teaches you something, even if it’s negative. The negative ones seem to stick with people more and that’s where you get to learn things,” Crawford said. “It’s tough, especially when there are stretches when you don’t get a sniff at coming up and it seems like you’re going to be there for the rest of your career. Then there are other times you’re really confident and you feel you should be in the NHL. That’s all about learning, learning to stay level headed and not get too down or too high. Just work hard, have fun.”

Patrick Kane leads Blackhawks to win in Buffalo homecoming

Patrick Kane leads Blackhawks to win in Buffalo homecoming

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Patrick Kane felt a little sheepish for being a little too emotional during a fist-pumping celebration after extending Chicago's lead to four goals in the third period.

It certainly wasn't a clutch goal or anything like that. The Blackhawks coasted to a 5-1 win over the Sabres on Sunday night.

Then again, Kane only gets to play in his Buffalo hometown once a year.

"I was a little jacked up for a 5-1 goal," Kane said. "I don't even know what I was thinking after that. It was kind of a blackout in that moment."

At least it had some historical significance.

It was Kane's 20th goal of the season, making the South Buffalo native the league's first American-born player to score that many in each of his first 10 seasons , according to Elias Sports. Kane also became the fifth Blackhawks player to reach the 20-goal plateau 10 times on a franchise career list led by Stan Mikita's 14.

"I think it's a pretty cool number," Kane said, before joking he's starting to feel old for 28.

"It's almost sad how fast it goes by," he added. "I feel maybe not as young as I used to be. ... Hopefully, a lot of great years left."

Marian Hossa and Jonathan Toews broke it open with second-period goals for Chicago, which won for the sixth time in seven games. Ryan Hartman and Artem Anisimov also scored, helping the Blackhawks bounce back from a 3-1 loss to Edmonton on Saturday.

Scott Darling, subbing for starter Corey Crawford, made 25 saves in just his seventh appearance in two months.

Evander Kane scored and Robin Lehner stopped 32 shots for Buffalo in its final game before its five-day bye. The Sabres were trying for their first four-game win streak since December 2014.

Patrick Kane, however, was part of the draw given the large number of No. 88 Blackhawks jerseys that dominated several parts of the stands. And he gave them plenty to cheer about in the third period.

First, his one-timer from the high slot set up Anisimov's goal, making it 4-1 at the 3:29 mark.

Some three minutes later, Kane showed off some of his remarkable stick-handling skills. The NHL MVP was set up on the right of the Buffalo net, and was untouched for several seconds before easily depositing the puck inside the right post .

Kane celebrated by skating around the net, dropping down to one knee and pumping his arm, before flashing a big smile at a large number of Blackhawks fans in the stands.

Darling ate it up from the far end of the rink, knowing how special the moment was to Kane.

"It's an emotional game," Darling said. "I was super happy for him to have a highlight-reel goal like that."

Kane has scored in eight straight games against the Sabres. He upped his career total to eight goals and four assists in 13 meetings.

Chicago won its 11th consecutive game over Buffalo. The Blackhawks haven't lost to the Sabres since a 2-1 defeat at Buffalo on Dec. 11, 2009.

The Sabres were unable to match the Blackhawks' speed or depth after Evander Kane tied the game by converting Jack Eichel's centering pass with 6 seconds left in the first period.

Buffalo was outshot 20-14 over the final 40 minutes and 37-26 overall.

"We did too much sitting back, playing in our own zone," Eichel said. "We didn't play aggressive enough. We gave them too much room and the puck ended in our net."

Fatigue could have played a factor for the Sabres, who went 4-2 over a stretch of six games in nine days, including a 3-2 win over St. Louis on Saturday night.

"We can take some time here to rest a bit and try and let ourselves refocus for the last push of the season," Eichel said.