Chicago Blackhawks

Blackhawks erupt in second, edge out Blues

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Blackhawks erupt in second, edge out Blues

Monday, Feb. 21, 2011
3:29 p.m.

By Tracey Myers
CSNChicago.com

ST. LOUIS Jonathan Toews had seen enough.

The Chicago Blackhawks had played an awful first 20 minutes against the St. Louis Blues, turning the puck over, playing shoddy in other aspects and had a 2-0 deficit to show for it. So in that first intermission, the captain let off some steam.

We say what we have to do before the game and then to play that way the first 20 minutes was unacceptable, Toews said. The leaders in the locker room held the rest of the team accountable.

And over the next 20-plus, the Blackhawks were accountable.

Patrick Kane and Toews each scored their 20th goals of the season as the Blackhawks scored four second-period goals en route to their 5-3 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday afternoon. The Blackhawks are still listed in 11th place but are one of five Western Conference teams with 68 points.

Viktor Stalbergs early second-period goal was the spark for the Blackhawks, who got off to another woeful start to a Blues team that was hungry, determined and physical. For a Blackhawks team fighting for every possible point and a playoff spot, the first-period response or lack thereof -- was once again head-scratching.

I was venting a little frustration after first period because we say the same things over and over. We know St. Louis is going to come out hard. We know its going to be a tough game and we cant afford to go out there and blow the first period. After a while it sounds like a broken record, Toews said. Every guy understood going into that second period, and were happy with the response.

Dave Bolland scored a minute after Stalberg and Kanes goal came about three minutes after Bollands. Toews added his power-play goal to cap the four-goal period. The spread-out scoring was a welcome sight, considering the Blackhawks top line had done the bulk of it lately.

Youre not going to win with one line. It shows the depth we do have here. Thats what we need to do down the stretch here, acting head coach Mike Haviland said. It jump-starts you when other lines start to score. You can see the whole attitude change on the bench when we got that (Stalberg) goal. We just have to keep pushing that, push each other and challenge each other.

Corey Crawford won his second game in as many days, stopping 31-of-34 shots. Crawford wasnt surprised that Toews spoke up after the first.

Jonnys done that all year. He knows what to say at the right time, Crawford said. He told us to relax and play our game that we know we can. The first period was gone and there was nothing more we could do about it. We just had to go out there and play.
Marian Hossa added an empty-net goal with a second remaining. Jake Dowells hustle down ice on that last sequence saved an icing call and led to the Blackhawks final goal.

The Blackhawks dug in for this one. It was a good departure from other bad starts, which too often led to bad finishes. Their captain talked. They listened. Now they need this two-game winning streak to turn into something substantial.

This could be a big thing to jump-start us here, Haviland said. I think it was more for us to realize that dont get too high after wins and that we have to go back to work. Maybe it did take a goal in the second period or something said in the first intermission to get us going. Im proud of those guys.

Waived off

The St. Louis Blues had a goal waived off in the third period when forward BJ Crombeen was ruled in the crease. Crawford said the Blues were in and around him all day.

They were doing that all night, not giving me a chance to get out and challenge, Crawford said. I let the refs know it was their plan to do that.

Briefly

Fernando Pisani (head), Nick Boynton and John Scott (healthy) were Mondays scratches. Haviland said there was no change in Pisanis status.

Tracey Myers is CSNChicago.com's Blackhawks Insider. Follow Tracey on Twitter @TramyersCSN for up-to-the-minute Hawks information.

Blackhawks' young players brimming with confidence

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USA TODAY

Blackhawks' young players brimming with confidence

Ryan Hartman is entering this training camp with a much higher level of confidence. Having a spot on this roster, something he wasn’t sure he’d have entering last fall, helps. But the confidence is a byproduct of his entire rookie season and every experience it brought with it.

“You get a full season under your belt and you’re able to feel out the game, adjust your speed and your quickness to the pace of the NHL game,” he said. “Last year was a big step for all of us, coming in here this year knowing what to expect, knowing how to play their game right and thinking of what to do on the ice.”

As several of the Blackhawks embark on their second season in the NHL there’s more certainty in their approach, whether they’re already part of this roster (Hartman and Nick Schmaltz) or trying to get one of the few coveted spots remaining (John Hayden and Vinnie Hinostroza).

When Schmaltz entered camp last fall he was fresh out of college and admittedly apprehensive – “I was nervous coming in, didn’t know if it was going to work,” he said at the team’s convention in July. There has been none of that this past week. A stronger, more confident Schmaltz has emerged, one that’s approached coach Joel Quenneville enough to give him a shot at the second-line center role.

“Yeah, it’s just familiarity with the coaching and the players,” he said. “You just know what to expect, you kind of come in with a good mindset and start off on the right track right away.”

Much like 2016, Hinostroza is on the bubble again this fall. But unlike last September he’s not sweating what may or may not happen out of camp.

“This year I feel like I’m more mentally stronger, more mature,” he said. “I don’t feel pressure at all. Maybe a year ago I did, thinking, ‘what are these guys going to do?’ But this year… I’m trying to focus on myself and I’m confident where I’m at. I made some improvements. I’m just going to believe in myself and the rest will play out.”

Hayden, on the same bubble as Hinostroza, got a taste of the NHL late last spring following his senior season at Yale. It was a small sample size but Hayden nevertheless got a good idea of what to work on entering the fall – improving his speed was a big focus – and what to expect overall.

“It’s so fast at this level. So yeah, it definitely helped playing games at the end of the year. If anything, told myself I belong at this level. There are familiar faces at camp, and it’s my job to prove I deserve to be on the team,” he said. “No [pressure]; you just control what you can and that’s my play. I put the work in for the offseason and now I have to play my game.”

Hartman’s biggest adjustment came with the speed, too – “it’s a completely different level from Rockford to here, the pace of play and how quickly everything happens,” he said. That, and being confident enough to know when to hold the puck and when to give it up.

“Right away I was getting the puck and wanting to get it to someone else just so I didn’t make a mistake. Now I’m trying to make plays and trying to better the team,” Hartman said. “I definitely feel pretty good this year.”

For the Blackhawks who got their first taste here last season, the wide-eyed part of the NHL indoctrination is over. Now to keep building on the experience. And the confidence.

Blackhawks' Alexandre Fortin finding form again after offseason surgery

Blackhawks' Alexandre Fortin finding form again after offseason surgery

Alexandre Fortin was grateful to be back on the ice this weekend, back in Chicago where he wowed the Blackhawks last fall and nearly found a spot on the regular-season roster.

His thoughts are on repeating that camp performance. What he has to keep his mind clear of, however, is the sports hernia and surgery that sidelined him for part of the summer.

“It’s normal. You don’t want to get hurt again,” he said. “When you’re starting in camp like that, everyone’s good so you just have to get to a high level quick. At the same time, you just have to [listen to] your body and do things right.”

When Fortin has been on the ice, however, he’s been impressive. Following Sunday’s outing coach Joel Quenneville talked of the young forward showing the abilities that made him such a pleasant camp surprise in 2016.

“He’s coming off that injury, missed a day and change but [Sunday] all of a sudden he had his legs, his stride back,” Quenneville said. “He’s a fast player who can back off defensemen and this year, this camp, at least we got him out there and captured that speed. He can be useful.”

Fortin had sports hernia surgery in late June; he was present at the Blackhawks’ prospect camp in July but, because of the recent surgery, was limited to off-ice workouts. He was back on ice at the team’s prospect tournament in Traverse City, Mich., where the Blackhawks claimed the tournament title. That helped Fortin feel more comfortable again as he returned for his second Blackhawks camp, but he’ll keep an eye on things to make sure he doesn’t re-aggravate his hernia.

“I’m in good hands here and they know what to do with me,” I just do what they ask me. Camp is long, so we’ll just keep improving every day.”

The good thing is the Blackhawks are again happy with what Fortin is doing, even in his limited work at camp. The problem is there probably won’t be room for him, at least in the early going. The Blackhawks’ depth signings in early July mean a lot of one-way contracts, and other young guys – Alex DeBrincat and John Hayden among them – are also vying for a roster spot.

Fortin will mind his injury but still wants to go through this camp the same way he did the last one, playing his strongest game and looking for an opportunity. Whether it happens now or later, he’s happy to get it.

“I mean, camp is long so you have to focus on what you can see,” Fortin said. “Like [general manager] Stan Bowman and Joel said at the beginning of camp, everybody’s here to make the team and just try to find a way to do that. That’s my plan and I’ll do what I can do and see after.”

BRIEFLY

As they usually do, the Blackhawks will send most of their young players to their first preseason game on Tuesday night in Columbus.  Asked if he would send the Alex DeBrincat-Nick Schmaltz-Patrick Kane combo that has been together the last few days at camp, Quenneville said, “maybe one of those three will go.”

The Blackhawks will start cutting their training camp roster either Wednesday or Thursday.