Chicago Blackhawks

Blackhawks mailbag: Missing elements to meals on the road

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AP

Blackhawks mailbag: Missing elements to meals on the road

Two more days. Just two more days.

If you think the summer has felt long to you, think how it’s felt to the Blackhawks. It’s been a bittersweet one for a few reasons, from that abrupt postseason exit to Marian Hossa’s issues to watching more teammates get traded away to welcoming two former Blackhawks back to the lineup.

We’ve addressed a lot of topics this offseason and there will be much more to talk about once training camp begins on Friday morning. I would’ve thought there wouldn’t be many more questions left but you all still had some and I thank you again for your participation.

So before training camp finally beginneths, have a read at the final offseason Twitter mailbag.

Unless either/both just really knock it out of the park at training camp and give coach Joel Quenneville and company those tough decisions they say they love to make, I say both start the season in Rockford. Whether or not they get called up later always depends on how they’re doing/what the Blackhawks need at any particular time. All that said, there’s always some surprise out of training camp and I’m curious to see who it is this season.

First, my apologies. I misread this and gave my power-play prognostications (thank you, Tom Quinn, for pointing out my error). Anyway, to answer the question you actually asked. The Blackhawks’ penalty kill will really feel the offseason losses. Of the six players who logged the most shorthanded minutes last season, four of them are gone (Niklas Hjalmarsson, Marcus Kruger, Dennis Rasmussen and Marian Hossa). Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook remain a key part of it. Connor Murphy and Tommy Wingels have experience there. When I talked to Wingels at the convention he talked of playing on the PK, “to take some of the minutes off that core. Do you want your best players eating up hard minutes, penalty killing? Probably not. You want to use them in other situations.” He’s right, but the Blackhawks will likely still put the onus on the guys they know well. And before we all assume the penalty kill will struggle early due to changes, remember: it got off to a horrific start last season with its longtime personnel.

That’s certainly the hope. Nobody was more frustrated than Toews with how his game went last season, hence the changes. Be it that or the reunion with Saad, all of this looks great on paper. It would be outstanding for the team, and especially for Toews, if he and Saad picked up right where they left off in 2015. I’ve said it before but it bears repeating: of all the former Blackhawks the team has brought back, the Saad reacquisition has the most likely chance for success. We’ll see if it actually comes to fruition.

Yeah, the Predators sweeping the Blackhawks out of the first round certainly ups the ante in their matchups from here on out. Last season was a reminder that what happens in the regular season meant a damn thing when the playoffs arrive. The Blackhawks should be angry and motivated, but not just when they face the Predators. While you’re never going to get consistency through 82 games the Blackhawks need to treat last year’s dismissal as a wake-up call.

Outside of a complete bust performance at camp or other strange occurrence, I’m going to assume Franson will be on the Blackhawks’ roster this season. They need another veteran back there, and once they place Hossa on LTIR after the season starts (he has to be on the roster Day 1 of the season) I’d expect signing Franson would be next. I don’t see Jurco going anywhere right now; Stan Bowman’s made it clear that he loves the guy. With Tomas Jurco and Jordin Tootoo, either would have to go through waivers.

If I had to put it on a scale of 1-10 I’d say about a seven (granted, I’m not the panicky type and it would take a hell of a lot for me to put anything at a 10). We all know what the Blackhawks lost and filling those voids, especially Niklas Hjalmarsson’s, won’t be easy. That’s why I think Franson, as I said above, is likely a part of this. We don’t know how Connor Murphy will transition into this defense yet. As I wrote as part of my five questions earlier this week, some of the Blackhawks’ young defensemen have opportunities here but they’ve got to be ready to fill some big voids. How much will Keith be taking on this year? Can Seabrook bounce back from last season? There are a lot of questions with this defense so yes, concern is a good word to use.

Ah, speaking of great defensive players… yeah we’ve talked about this a lot because it’s another problem. Hossa was just one guy but he was one hell of a guy when it came to all facets of the game. Everyone’s going to have to do a little bit more. Saad solves part of that problem but it can’t be just him. Plus, the Blackhawks are going to have to find a new king of the battle drills. I’ll keep an eye out for candidates myself; I don’t want that Spaceballs GIF to go to waste.

I unfortunately have no update on Hossa. Eddie, understandably, values his privacy during this time. But he said to let you all know he is undergoing treatment, doing alright and he appreciates all the kind words and support he’s received.

Yes, Steve Konroyd will be in for Olczyk for the time being. And Mr. Mayers will indeed be part of CSN’s pre- and postgame programs.

Yes, the Blackhawks’ new facility will be very much like Johnny’s IceHouse West in terms practices being open to the public.

Since I answered the first question above let’s just skip to the wine (usually a good idea regardless). At a recent dinner I got to try Carpineto Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. It’s a little pricier than I’d usually go ($25-30 range per bottle) but it was outstanding.

Montreal, with Vancouver being a very close second (let’s call them 1 and 1A). I probably lean toward Montreal because we don’t get there near enough and I love getting the chance to speak French, even if it’s a brief opportunity. Vancouver is just a fantastic blend of water and mountains.

This may be the easiest question I ever get, so thanks in advance for that. The paella at Barroco in Montreal, the black linguine frutti di mare at Mangiamo’s in Manhattan Beach and sushi at (pick a sushi place, any sushi place) in Vancouver.

I’m very curious to see this unfold. Whether it proves to be a success or not it’s going to take time, but it’s worth a shot. If there’s a market there, if there’s a real interest in growing the game, why not?

If you’re still looking for French food, I’d recommend Chez Joel near UIC. If the weather cooperates they have a great little patio off to the side of the restaurant. Otherwise, so many choices. For Italian, Nonnina or Mama’s Boy. I just tried Tanta not too long ago (Peruvian) and it was outstanding.

It will change at some point soon. I suggested CSITraMyers as my new handle but I was just a few letters off — and the wrong network.

Blackhawks Camp Synopsis: Roster starting to take shape

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USA TODAY

Blackhawks Camp Synopsis: Roster starting to take shape

One week down, roughly one week to go.

Some things have fallen into place during the Blackhawks’ first seven days of training camp but this week is when it really gets interesting. The roster will continue to take shape and the competition for the few vacancies will intensify. Here’s a look at what we’ve already seen in Week 1 and questions for Week 2.

Stock Rising

Jordan Oesterle. We could put a few of the young forwards here, but we’ve talked about them quite a bit and will continue to do so. So right now let’s look at Oesterle, who coach Joel Quenneville liked “a lot” in Thursday’s game against the Red Wings. A puck moving defenseman, Oesterle said he played on the right side with the Edmonton Oilers but could also play on the left. If Oesterle has another good week of camp, that and his versatility might get him a chance on a Blackhawks defense still looking for the right pieces.  

Stock Falling

Tomas Jurco. Please realize where we’re coming from with this assessment: where does he fit in this lineup? He didn’t get a lot of opportunities last season but when he did play there wasn’t anything that made him stand out. Stan Bowman likes him and much like with David Rundblad, the Blackhawks want to give the Jurco a chance to justify the draft pick they gave up for him (a third-round selection from the 2017 draft). Several young guys are pushing hard for roster spots. Can Jurco be an every-day player or do the Blackhawks have a decision to make in favor of some of those up-and-coming players? Just very interested to see how this turns out.

Biggest surprise

Nick Schmaltz’s second-line center opportunity. Maybe we should’ve been more open minded to this happening but considering how little that line changed last year you figured Artem Anisimov and Patrick Kane would stay together even after the Artemi Panarin trade. But given the strides Schmaltz has made in his own game and the skating work he and Kane did together this offseason, Quenneville wants to see what Schmaltz can do in the middle. There’s always tinkering with this team; we really should have seen the possibility coming but we didn’t.

Some Remaining Questions

- If there’s one forward spot vacant out of training camp, which young player wins it? John Hayden. Here’s why: even if Alex DeBrincat doesn’t make this team out of camp, the Blackhawks’ top six is looking pretty good. Meanwhile the bottom six, especially that fourth line, has some holes. Getting a young player with some size, speed, skill and sandpaper that Quenneville likes and trusts (and he likes and trusts Hayden) would be a great addition to the bottom six.

- Will there be any surprises on defense? Maybe. Part of it depends on what the Blackhawks do about the Michal Rozsival situation. Rozsival didn’t pass his physical (upper body injury) and is not participating in camp. You hate to see someone go out like this, but it may be the end for the veteran. If so, the seventh defensive spot opens up and so do the Blackhawks options. After Duncan Keith, Brent Seabrook and Connor Murphy you have Cody Franson (if the Blackhawks sign him), Oesterle and Jan Rutta who have made good preseason impacts. Michal Kempny’s in the mix, too. Gustav Forsling is on the bubble. He had a great camp last fall but didn’t improve off it; that has to change this season.

- Will the top line combination work? There’s no doubt the Blackhawks missed Brandon Saad. He may not have been facing the sturdiest Red Wings team on Thursday but Saad’s powerful game was nevertheless impressive and a reminder of how much the Blackhawks missed that element the last two seasons. But the Saad-Jonathan Toews-Richard Panik combo hasn’t gotten a great look yet — Toews missed Thursday’s game due to illness. Saturday should be the first chance to see if these three can really click.

Five takeaways from Blackhawks' 6-1 win over Red Wings in preseason home opener

Five takeaways from Blackhawks' 6-1 win over Red Wings in preseason home opener

Here are five takeaways from the Blackhawks' 6-1 win over the Detroit Red Wings in Thursday's preseason home opener:

1. DeBrincat-Schmaltz-Kane unit was electric.

Yeah, this line could work. We realize the Red Wings sent over many of their fringe players, but Alex DeBrincat, Nick Schmaltz and Patrick Kane are all on the same wavelength offensively and it was evident in their first preseason game together.

The trio combined for four points (one goal and three assists), and created several quality scoring chances at even strength throughout the game. Kane was Kane, Schmaltz was one of the best players on the ice and DeBrincat cashed in for his first career (preseason) goal in the NHL.

This is certainly something to keep an eye on as roster cuts get underway and final decisions on the Opening Day lineup approach. Will DeBrincat be a part of the big club? It was considered a long shot before training camp started, but it's hard to ignore the chemistry he's developing on that second line.

2. Brandon Saad picks up where he left off in Blackhawks uniform.

It's like he never left. In his first game back in a Chicago sweater, Saad netted a hat trick — albeit, it's preseason so it won't count in the books — and he could have had a fourth, and maybe even a fifth, if you want to look further into the chances he had. All three goals that he did score though he found himself parked in front of the net, which is a great sign for the Blackhawks because it's something they lacked last year.

"The puck seemed to be finding me," Saad said after the win. "Regardless of what kind of game it is, you want to get your confidence rolling. It’s good to be back out here. It's always nice to be wanted and welcomed, and these fans are the best fans in the league, so it’s good to be back."

Saad finished the game with a game-high eight shots on goal and a plus-3 rating, and he did it without Jonathan Toews, who did not play due to an illness.

3. Connor Murphy developing chemistry with Duncan Keith.

The Blackhawks' new top pairing featuring two-time Norris Trophy winner Keith and 24-year-old Murphy was solid in their first game together.

Murphy wasn't afraid to be aggressive and take chances by pinching in, joining the rush, and quarterbacking the power play with confidence. He also didn't make any glaring defensive mistakes, which is a plus in Quenneville's book.

"I thought everybody played well on our back end," Quenneville said. "Then we went down to five, I thought they looked very good."

(Luc Snuggerud suffered an upper-body injury in the second period, and did not return. Quenneville said they will know more about his status on Friday).

4. Jordan Oesterle catches Joel Quenneville's attention.

Of those six defensemen noted above, the one that really stood out to the Blackhawks coach was Oesterle. The 25-year-old blue liner signed a two-year contract with Chicago over the offseason, and is fighting for a spot on the bottom pairing.

He made a strong early case by registering two assists and leading the team with three blocked shots in 21:49 of ice time, playing on both the power play and penalty kill units.

"I liked him. A lot," Quenneville said. "I liked his thought process, jumping up in the play, positionally very strong, quick and headsy. He did a really good job. He's got some flexibility and the ability to play both sides is a great asset to have."

5. What to make of abundance of penalties...

We mentioned the NHL's desire to crack down on slashing penalties and faceoff violations in our five takeaways after Tuesday's preseason opener, and it remained the same Thursday. There were another 13 penalties called, three of which were slashing, and handful of centers getting tossed from the dot.

So what should we make of it all?

Well, it's hard to imagine the amount of penalties will stay the same once the actual regular season starts. It seems like a tactic to lay down the hammer extra hard in an effort to get players to adapt to the new enforced rules as quickly as possible. It will be interesting to follow how things may change over the course of the season, with referees having the tendency to swallow their whistles as the important games roll around, especially in the Stanley Cup playoffs.