NHL owners express their disappointment

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NHL owners express their disappointment

NHL owners have been quiet during this lockout, a league bylaw forbids them to, and stiff monetary penalties are possible if they do. But after being part of talks with players this past week in New York, four owners released statements regarding the now broken-down collective bargaining agreement negotiations.

Some statements were strong. Larry Tanenbaum, chairman of Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment, stated, I question whether the union is interested in making an agreement. I am very disappointed and disillusioned. Had I not experienced this process myself, I might not have believed it.

Here are the four owners statements, per the NHL, in their entirety:

Ron Burkle, Co-Owner, Pittsburgh Penguins

"The idea to put players and owners together in the same room was a refreshing idea. Commissioner Bettman should be thanked for proposing it and the Fehrs should be thanked for agreeing to it.

The players came with a strong desire to get back to playing hockey. They were professional and did a good job of expressing their concerns and listening to ours. We wanted to move quickly and decisively. We have all spent too much time without any real progress at the expense of our fans, our sponsors and the communities we serve. It was time to make bold moves and get a deal. Many people think we got over our skis and they are probably right, but we wanted to do everything we could to get back to hockey now. We didn't hold back.

We made substantial movement on our end quickly, but unfortunately that was not met with the same level of movement from the other side. The players asked us to be patient and keep working with them. t's not what they do and they wanted us to know they were committed.

We understood and appreciate their situation. We came back with an aggressive commitment to pensions which we felt was well received. We needed a response on key items that were important to us, but we were optimistic that we were down to very few issues. I believe a deal was within reach.

We were therefore surprised when the Fehrs made a unilateral and "non-negotiable" decision - which is their right, to end the playerowner process that has moved us farther in two days than we have moved at any time in the past months.

I want to thank the players involved for their hard work as we tried to reach a deal.

I hope that going backwards does not prevent a deal."

Mark Chipman, Chairman and Governor, Winnipeg Jets:

"I'd like to thank the NHL for giving me the opportunity to participate in this very important process.

I came here optimistic that we could find a solution. That sense of optimism grew after our first few sessions, including the small group discussions late last night.

Regrettably, we have been unable to close the divide on some critical issues that we feel are essential to the immediate and long-term health of our game.

While I sense there are some members of the players association that understand our perspective on these issues, clearly there are many that don't.

I am deeply disappointed that we were unable to bring this extremely unfortunate situation to a successful conclusion and I wish to apologize to our fans and sponsors for letting them down."

Larry Tanenbaum, Chairman of the Board, Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment

"I was pleased to be asked to join the PlayerOwner negotiation sessions. I had hoped that my perspective both as a businessman and as one of the owners of the Toronto Maple Leafs would be helpful to the process. Like all other teams, this work stoppage has hurt our fans, our employees and our business. Neither the owners nor the players will ever recover the losses incurred with this work stoppage.

I understand how important it is to have a strong league and 30 healthy teams. I must admit that I was shocked at how things have played out over the last 48 hours. The sessions on Tuesday felt cooperative with an air of goodwill. I was optimistic and conveyed my optimism to the Board of Governors at our Wednesday meeting. However, when we reconvened with the players on Wednesday afternoon, it was like someone had thrown a switch. The atmosphere had completely changed. Nevertheless, the owners tried to push forward and made a number of concessions and proposals, which were not well-received. I question whether the union is interested in making an agreement.

I am very disappointed and disillusioned. Had I not experienced this process myself, I might not have believed it. Like all hockey fans, I am hopeful this situation can be resolved as soon as possible. I miss our game."

Jeff Vinik, Chairman and Governor, Tampa Bay Lightning:

"After working this week with our players toward what we hoped would be a new agreement, owners presented a proposal we believed would benefit those great players, ownership, and, ultimately, our fans for many years to come. While trust was built and progress was made along the way, unfortunately, our proposal was rejected by the Union's leadership. My love for the game is only superseded by my commitment to our fans and I hold out hope we can soon join with our players and return the game back to its rightful place on the ice."

Patrick Kane, Eddie Olczyk, Dale Tallon and more team up and lace up for charity

Patrick Kane, Eddie Olczyk, Dale Tallon and more team up and lace up for charity

Officially the Blackhawks season begins Thursday, Oct. 4th against the defending Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins.

BUT … if you just can’t wait that long to see some of your favorite Blackhawks then you may want to check out the Chicago Hockey Charity Classic.

The event is a charity hockey game that is being put on by Illinois native Topher Scott. Scott played locally for organizations such as the Chicago Young Americans before playing for the Chicago Steel of the USHL and capping off an impressive amateur career with four years at Cornell University.

The goal of the event is to raise $100K for Special Olympics Chicago by putting together a game full of local hockey celebrities shown below.

CSN’s own Eddie Olczyk will step down from the booth and onto the ice joining a list of impressive current and former Blackhawks. And oh yeah, a guy named Patrick Kane will also be participating.

This game is not limited to only Blackhawks. It has an impressive list of Illinois natives such as:

Garret Sparks, G, Toronto Maple Leafs — Elmhurst

Robbie Russo, D, Detroit Red Wings —  Westmont

John Moore, D, New Jersey Devils —  Winnetka

Megan Bozek, D, USA Women's National Team —  Arlington Heights

Kendall Coyne, D, USA Women's National Team — Oak Lawn

And more.

Even local Twitter celebrity @BarstoolChief is getting in on the action for a good cause.

The game is taking place on Saturday, Aug. 5th at 3 p.m. at the Fox Valley Ice Arena in Geneva. Leading up to puck drop there is a GiveGab online fundraising campaign that you can visit here, and contribute if you would like.

If you are in desperate need of seeing some Blackhawks hockey, or just want to be part of a great cause you can get your tickets to the event right here for just $25.

Better hurry up though, Scott is anticipating all 3,000 tickets to sell out.

Why Blackhawks prospects are already buying what Rockford coach Jeremy Colliton is selling

Why Blackhawks prospects are already buying what Rockford coach Jeremy Colliton is selling

Luke Johnson has gotten a few chances to talk to Rockford head coach Jeremy Colliton, and he likes what the new coach is selling.

“He seems like a knowledgeable guy about the game,” said Johnson, who played 73 games with the IceHogs last season. “He’s a younger guy and his career wasn’t too long ago. That’s always nice having a younger coach that can kind of relate to us a little bit more. I’m looking forward to getting going with him and working with him.”

They’ve gotten to work together some already at the Blackhawks’ development camp this week, where Colliton has started to see who may be making up the IceHogs’ roster in a few months. The 32-year-old Colliton was a player himself not too long ago, and that connection has meant a smaller gap between he and his future players.

“I guess it’s another way to relate to them, another way to try and get the message across that they need to hear to get better,” Colliton said. “I’ve been in their shoes, I’ve been in their position and so hopefully that allows me to get that message across… whether it’s part of their game or what they’re doing off ice or how they approach things. There are so many things that can help them become Blackhawks. Getting that message across in different ways is a benefit.”

Colliton was among the coaches working with a group of prospects on Wednesday afternoon. Several of the players in that group either played some in Rockford last season (including Johnson and Matheson Iacopelli) or are headed there for the first time this fall. At the same time Colliton is learning himself, getting integrated in the Blackhawks’ way of doing things.

“Right from the first interview there’s been a discussion on how the Blackhawks want to play, and it fits well with how I see the game and how we played in Mora,” said Colliton of the team he coached in Sweden prior to returning to the states. “Whether it’s new guys as first-year pros or guys who have been there before, we have to continue to play at a high pace, have the puck as much as possible and play that up-tempo style that’s given the organization so much success.”

The fact that Colliton isn’t far removed from the game himself has already helped him connect with his soon-to-be IceHogs players. The other connection is the desire to win, which is there regardless of age gap.

“I’ve always paid attention to what I thought was important to win. As a competitor, nothing better than winning. As a player it was a big priority for me and when you become a coach it’s the same thing. You do whatever you can to help the team win and help the players learn what it takes to be successful individually,” Colliton said. “If you start there, they’re receptive to your message.”