Banged-up Rose expects to play Wednesday

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Banged-up Rose expects to play Wednesday

Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010
2:37 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

No reason to sound the alarm just yet: Derrick Rose's scary tumble in the fourth quarter of Monday night's win over Indiana won't require him to miss Wednesday's game at Toronto, if the Bulls All-Star point guard has his way.

"It was very tough last night," Rose told reporters after Tuesday's practice at the Berto Center. "Right now, I'm just feeling a little sore, but hopefully I'll be playing tomorrow."

"If it's up to me, I'm playing, knowing that it's only sore and usually I could play through soreness."

Rose, whose injuries were classified as a sprained right wrist and a bruised right elbow--the third-year guard said he only "tweaked" his left ankle on a play prior to the hard fall--surprisingly said that neither of those injuries were bothering him the most Tuesday.

"It would have to be my (right) hip. My hip is really messed up," said Rose, who didn't participate in Tuesday's practice and wore a brace on his injured wrist. "It's (Rose's right wrist) not that bad...if anything, my (right) elbow hurts more than my wrist. Right now, I'm a little beat up, but I think that I should be able to play through it."

"I've just been getting treatment. I'll be getting treatment on the plane (Tuesday afternoon), getting treatment in Toronto and hopefully for the game, I should be all right," continued Rose, who will ice his injuries, get electronic stimulation and take painkillers. "Last night was probably the worst I've felt in a long time, knowing that my whole body was sore. I had to soak everything. It was a bad night."

"I'm just happy and blessed that I didn't break anything."

At the time of the fall--which occurred midway through the game's final period when Rose was undercut in the air by Pacers swingman Brandon Rush--Rose feared the worst.

"At first, I thought I was going to hit my head. I kind of held myself with my arm and wrist," said Rose of his thought process. "That's basketball. You learn from it, situations like that. I think I was just mad that they weren't calling the calls and I was just trying to drive very hard and make them call it, and that ended up happening."

"I feel like a Bears player. I've got all these injuries."

Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau was cautiously optimistic when he addressed reporters.

"He had some soreness today, but everything appears to be fine," said Thibodeau after Tuesday's practice. "He's a little nicked up, but his ankle's fine. There's a little soreness in the elbow, a little soreness in the wrist."

"If he says he can play, then he'll play. He's moving around pretty good today," he added. "We won't know until he goes through shootaround tomorrow."

"He has a lot of toughness, both mental and physical. He doesn't like to take any plays off. He doesn't like to take any days off. He attacks the basket, he gets knocked down, he gets up, he'll keep going. He doesn't shy away."

During the game, Rose was whistled for his first technical foul in the NBA--and his entire basketball career.

"That was my first one ever. High school or grammar school, college, ever," Rose revealed. "I think the play where I drove, it had to be a charge or a blocking foul. They didn't call anything. It kind of got to me."

"I said it was 'some b.s.' It took him a while to give me the tech. I thought it was over with. I guess it got to him. I'm running back down the court and he called it," he continued. "He was shocked that I said. That's why, I guess, it took him so long."

Rose did find some humor in the situation, joking, "Hopefully I don't get anymore techs because I need that money. It's a recession out here."

Rose also touched upon the Bulls' current six-game and his growing chemistry with Carlos Boozer, who led the team with 22 points and 18 rebounds Monday.

"It's (the team's confidence) high, but we know that we can't get big-headed. We've got to continually improve on our defense, especially on our help side--just clogging the paint, just making it hard for the other team to score--so we can get into the open court," said Rose. "Anywhere around the basket, if I pass it to him (Boozer), he's going to get fouled or hit the shot. He's still getting in the groove. Some of the jump shots he took last night, those are shots he usually hits. We're very confident in his ability to shoot the ball and finish in the paint."

Despite his injuries, Rose had no hesitation when asked if Monday's scare would alter his game or mindset.

"I'm going to continue to drive. I didn't come into this league from shooting jump shots. I came into this league from driving."

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Dwyane Wade tweets apology to fans after Bulls' lopsided loss in Atlanta

Dwyane Wade tweets apology to fans after Bulls' lopsided loss in Atlanta

For the opening three quarters in Atlanta, the Bulls were off. 

So off, in fact, that Dwyane Wade tweeted an apology to Chicago fans after the game. 

Thanks to a furious run by the Bulls' bench, the final score ended at a respectable 102-93. In reality, though, the Hawks dominated. 

Wade and company trailed by 29 points at half and 30 at the end of three. The 35-year-old shooting guard finished with a minus-18 and just four points while All-Star starter Jimmy Butler posted a team-low minus-22.

The Bulls will look to shake off their lopsided loss against the Sacramento Kings on Saturday. 

 

Fred Hoiberg after Bulls' embarrassing loss to Hawks: 'We're gonna look at everything'

Fred Hoiberg after Bulls' embarrassing loss to Hawks: 'We're gonna look at everything'

The bus was warm before the game started, as the Bulls looked like they wanted no parts of the Atlanta Hawks.

It was evident from the jump that playing with a full and healthy squad for one of the few times this season wasn't enough to arouse their competitive juices, as they put together arguably their worst 48-minute showing in a 102-93 loss at Philips Arena, dropping them to 21-23 in a game they trailed by as many as 34 points.

The practices have apparently been the sterling jewel of effort and competitiveness for the Bulls but it hasn't carried over through the season as the inconsistency continues to be maddening — one that seems to go beyond the "growing pains" mantra that's been fed by all involved so far this year.

"It could be things but I don't want to share it with the media," a sunglasses-clad Dwyane Wade said outside the locker room, in a rare mood of not being elaborative following a loss.

It appears even the professional's professional has gotten a bit more frustrated than usual — understandable considering the way the starters came out with a lack of energy, with more turnovers (eight) than field goals (six) in the first quarter.

"Continue to try to lead behind the scenes," Wade said. "Can't stop when it's bad, when it's good. You gotta be the same."

Fred Hoiberg, fed up with the starters, ran with the reserves for the fourth quarter and outscored the Hawks by nearly 25 points, bringing the lead to 95-90 with a minute left before a Dennis Schroeder jumper restored order with 52.6 seconds left.

Four Hawks scored in double figures led by Schroeder's 25 points and six assists and Paul Millsap scoring 14 while making all four of his shots in just 22 minutes of run.

[MORE BULLS: Dwyane Wade not buying into the Bosh to Bulls speculation]

Perhaps it's the Hawks being the same kryptonite to the Bulls that the Bulls are to the Toronto Raptors — except the Bulls simply frustrate the Raptors, not embarrass them.

"I have been, we have been, tired of this. I gotta come out better," said Jimmy Butler, who led the Bulls with 19 points in 29 minutes. "I gotta play better from the jump, 48 minutes. That's not the way we're supposed to play. 

"The way we practice is not the way we play in the game. Don't ask me why, I don't know. Starting with me and going down the line, we gotta be better as a whole. Otherwise we'll keep getting our asses beat and it's bad."

The Hawks shot over 60 percent for most of the night until the game devolved into what amounted to a pickup game late. After all, the Hawks seemed to be battling boredom by half, leading 65-36 and shooting 68 percent from the field and hitting 67 percent from three.

"We're gonna look at everything and we'll see how we go out and start tomorrow and a couple days after that, hopefully we figure some things out," Hoiberg said. "They shot over 70 percent in the first quarter and you dig yourselves a hole and it's impossible to get out."

Hoiberg said he would evaluate everything leading into Saturday's game at home against the Sacramento Kings, but Friday didn't seem to present any realistic lineup changes based on performance.

Bobby Portis scored 10 with seven rebounds off the bench, with Jerian Grant scoring 12 and Paul Zipser 10. Doug McDermott and Nikola Mirotic combined to shoot two for nine, so one wonders where Hoiberg can go.

"I don't know. Practice is good. Practice is great," Butler said. "Practice is not gonna win you games. We gotta take what we do in practice and take it over to the game."

The Bulls weren't about to make it any more suspenseful than it had to be, as they started off missing their first 11 3-pointers, often missing multiple open looks on the same possession.

It wasn't relegated to just shooting as the Bulls squandered easy opportunities in easy situations, like Denzel Valentine turning a three-on-one fast break into an airballed finger-roll attempt that he caught himself — a violation, of course.

"I don't know, I can't put a word on it. Because it's just talk," Butler said. "Doesn't matter what you say, if we don't go out there and do it, what the hell is talking gonna do? We've been up and down all year. If we don't guard and turn the ball over, games get out of hand very quickly."

This one was over a few minutes into it, as the Bulls looked like a lifeless squad with no direction and very little fight, short of a minor dustup between Dwight Howard and Robin Lopez in the third quarter.

At that point, though, all Howard had to do is point at the scoreboard, where a 30-point lead did all the necessary talking.

The Bulls trailed by 20 even before Tim Hardaway Jr. hit a 35-footer to end the first quarter, sending the Hawks off on a high and seemingly demoralizing the Bulls.

Even Butler's 19-point night, hitting six of his eight shots in 29 minutes, rang hollow. The Bulls could've trotted out a D-League team for the second half to gear up for Saturday's game against Sacramento and been better off than how they performed Friday night.

And for the Bulls, they can't simply just go back to the drawing board. There looks to be something fundamentally wrong with this bunch — either that, or the Atlanta night got the best of them Thursday.