Banged-up Rose expects to play Wednesday

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Banged-up Rose expects to play Wednesday

Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010
2:37 PM

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

No reason to sound the alarm just yet: Derrick Rose's scary tumble in the fourth quarter of Monday night's win over Indiana won't require him to miss Wednesday's game at Toronto, if the Bulls All-Star point guard has his way.

"It was very tough last night," Rose told reporters after Tuesday's practice at the Berto Center. "Right now, I'm just feeling a little sore, but hopefully I'll be playing tomorrow."

"If it's up to me, I'm playing, knowing that it's only sore and usually I could play through soreness."

Rose, whose injuries were classified as a sprained right wrist and a bruised right elbow--the third-year guard said he only "tweaked" his left ankle on a play prior to the hard fall--surprisingly said that neither of those injuries were bothering him the most Tuesday.

"It would have to be my (right) hip. My hip is really messed up," said Rose, who didn't participate in Tuesday's practice and wore a brace on his injured wrist. "It's (Rose's right wrist) not that bad...if anything, my (right) elbow hurts more than my wrist. Right now, I'm a little beat up, but I think that I should be able to play through it."

"I've just been getting treatment. I'll be getting treatment on the plane (Tuesday afternoon), getting treatment in Toronto and hopefully for the game, I should be all right," continued Rose, who will ice his injuries, get electronic stimulation and take painkillers. "Last night was probably the worst I've felt in a long time, knowing that my whole body was sore. I had to soak everything. It was a bad night."

"I'm just happy and blessed that I didn't break anything."

At the time of the fall--which occurred midway through the game's final period when Rose was undercut in the air by Pacers swingman Brandon Rush--Rose feared the worst.

"At first, I thought I was going to hit my head. I kind of held myself with my arm and wrist," said Rose of his thought process. "That's basketball. You learn from it, situations like that. I think I was just mad that they weren't calling the calls and I was just trying to drive very hard and make them call it, and that ended up happening."

"I feel like a Bears player. I've got all these injuries."

Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau was cautiously optimistic when he addressed reporters.

"He had some soreness today, but everything appears to be fine," said Thibodeau after Tuesday's practice. "He's a little nicked up, but his ankle's fine. There's a little soreness in the elbow, a little soreness in the wrist."

"If he says he can play, then he'll play. He's moving around pretty good today," he added. "We won't know until he goes through shootaround tomorrow."

"He has a lot of toughness, both mental and physical. He doesn't like to take any plays off. He doesn't like to take any days off. He attacks the basket, he gets knocked down, he gets up, he'll keep going. He doesn't shy away."

During the game, Rose was whistled for his first technical foul in the NBA--and his entire basketball career.

"That was my first one ever. High school or grammar school, college, ever," Rose revealed. "I think the play where I drove, it had to be a charge or a blocking foul. They didn't call anything. It kind of got to me."

"I said it was 'some b.s.' It took him a while to give me the tech. I thought it was over with. I guess it got to him. I'm running back down the court and he called it," he continued. "He was shocked that I said. That's why, I guess, it took him so long."

Rose did find some humor in the situation, joking, "Hopefully I don't get anymore techs because I need that money. It's a recession out here."

Rose also touched upon the Bulls' current six-game and his growing chemistry with Carlos Boozer, who led the team with 22 points and 18 rebounds Monday.

"It's (the team's confidence) high, but we know that we can't get big-headed. We've got to continually improve on our defense, especially on our help side--just clogging the paint, just making it hard for the other team to score--so we can get into the open court," said Rose. "Anywhere around the basket, if I pass it to him (Boozer), he's going to get fouled or hit the shot. He's still getting in the groove. Some of the jump shots he took last night, those are shots he usually hits. We're very confident in his ability to shoot the ball and finish in the paint."

Despite his injuries, Rose had no hesitation when asked if Monday's scare would alter his game or mindset.

"I'm going to continue to drive. I didn't come into this league from shooting jump shots. I came into this league from driving."

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

New teammates, new changes put Jimmy Butler at ease

New teammates, new changes put Jimmy Butler at ease

The earrings were gleaming from Jimmy Butler’s ears, as he was his usual-disarming self with a playful smile and wink during his question-and-answer session with the Chicago media.

At a point, he took a deep breath as he looked around the Advocate Center with some of his new teammates walking around, some of whom had to carry nameplates because they weren’t recognizable faces in this new setting.

And because new faces are in town, it means two things: some faces left town and for Butler’s sake, the new ones will only know him as “Jimmy Butler, All-Star”, not the guy who was a late first-round pick, not the player who couldn’t get off the bench.

Butler didn’t bring up his comfort level, but when asked, he didn’t deny things appear to be a bit easier this time around.

“Does it make me feel more comfortable? I mean, to an extent, yeah, because then you can never say how you may have think that I’ve changed,” Butler said.

Butler’s ascension rubbed some the wrong way last season, and it’s been spoken about ad nauseam, whether it was true or not. But the moment of honesty wasn’t so much a shot at Derrick Rose or Joakim Noah, who departed for the Knicks in various forms; however it was an admission to his level of security, one that perhaps can lead to a more peaceful existence with all the core pieces.

The one way he’s always lead and will always speak to, is by example and work ethic. It’s one that turned him into an All-Star and Olympian.

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“I think everybody that’s on this roster now just knows how hard that I’ve worked to get to this spot that I’m at,” Butler said. “They’ve seen it. They’ve witnessed it. All they’ve been around for me is this point of my career. I don’t know if it sounds bad. But I think that all these guys look at, ‘If Jimmy works like that and if I work like that, I’ll be in the same position that he’s in.’ I’ll be more than happy to let you have that position because I think hard work can get you anywhere that you want to get to.”

So with that, Butler volunteered himself to Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg, to be the sacrificial lamb of wrath if need be. Easy to say if he doesn’t actually believe Hoiberg is capable of going from nice guy to madman at a moment’s notice but Butler laid it out for the record.

“I told Fred, ‘As much as you can, use me as an example. I want you to really get on my tail about every little thing.’,” Butler said. “Because if Doug or Tony or whoever it may be is watching coach talk to me like that, it’s going to be like, ‘If he can talk to Jimmy like that, I know he’s going to come at me a certain way.’ That’s what I try to remind him every day. I think he’s ready for that. I’m a player. I’m coachable like everybody else. I want that. I need that.”

The additions of Dwyane Wade and Rajon Rondo add championship receipts to a locker room that needs it, considering the Bulls want to play their young pieces. Wade and Rondo, the Bulls privately believe, will help Butler deal with everything that comes with a new role of leadership — and by proxy, Butler’s relationship and expectations of Hoiberg.

“He was put in a position last year he wasn't familiar with and I think we'll see growth from it,” Bulls general manager Gar Forman said. “The great thing about Jimmy is you know he comes in each and every day and gives 100 percent. He gets better every year and I think we'll continue to see that growth in his game and him as a person. I think that experience with USA basketball was real positive for him.”

Whether the trio lives up to the “Three Alphas” nickname remains to be seen, but after having a locker room with too many low-pitched voices, perhaps the change in pace — any change in pace — will be a welcome one for Butler.

“The Alpha thing, I think we’ll be just fine. Everybody is going to have something to say,” he said. “As long as everybody is listening and is willing to take some criticism if you’re doing something wrong, just like if you’re doing something right I’m going to tell you, there’s good and bad in everything you do. At the end of the day, as long as we win games, it won’t matter.”

Bulls' Jimmy Butler wants tough coaching from Fred Hoiberg this season

Bulls' Jimmy Butler wants tough coaching from Fred Hoiberg this season

 

Much was made of the Jimmy Butler-Fred Hoiberg dynamic last year.

As the duo head into Year 2 together with a very different Bulls roster, Jimmy Butler was very clear about one thing he wants out of his coach this season.

“I told Fred, ‘As much as you can, use me as an example,’” Butler said during the team’s media day on Monday. “I want you to really get on my tail about every little thing because if Doug (McDermott) or Tony (Snell) or whoever it may be, if watching coach talk to me like that he’s going to be like ‘If he can talk to Jimmy like that I know he’s going to come at me a certain way.’ So that’s what I try to remind him everyday. I think he’s ready for that. I’m a player. I’m coachable like everybody else, but I want that. I need that.”

Butler’s show of confidence in his coach didn’t stop at his belief that Hoiberg could follow through on Butler’s desire to be coached hard. The All-Star believes Hoiberg has improved as a coach heading into his second year on the job.

“It was his first year last year and I think he studied himself and us and the way we were up and down in so many areas of the game last year,” Butler said. “He’s trying to correct it. That’s just like anybody going into the offseason. He didn’t just not work. He studied and got better at what he needed to get better at. I think he’s ready moving forward.”