Beyond the Arc: Korver still searching for role

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Beyond the Arc: Korver still searching for role

Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2011
4:32 PM

By Mark Schanowski
CSNChicago.com
When the Bulls signed free agent sharp-shooter Kyle Korver last July, General Manager Gar Forman and Head Coach Tom Thibodeau hailed him as the perfect complement to Derrick Rose in the new offensive system. After all, he had just established an NBA record by making 53 percent of his three point attempts with the Utah Jazz. And, he would have some familiarity with teammates Carlos Boozer and Ronnie Brewer after playing with both guys in Utah.Unfortunately, 37 games into the season, Korver is looking like a bad fit on Thibodeaus Bulls. We all know Thibodeau is a defense-first coach, who makes most of his line-up decisions based on the ability to shut down the other teams top scorers. Korver is a willing defender, but hes not blessed with great quickness or overall athleticism. Since hes being asked to defend opposing shooting guards and small forwards, that deficiency will show up on most nights. As a result, Korvers playing time continues to drop. He was limited to just 4 minutes and 28 seconds against Detroit Monday night, and never got off the bench in the 2nd half when the Bulls were coming back from a 12-point deficit. So, what should the Bulls do to help Korver get his confidence back and become a more meaningful part of the team? As strange as it sounds, the best solution might be to put him in the starting line-up. Playing with Rose and Boozer right from the opening tip-off should get him a lot more open looks than hes getting with the 2nd unit. And we all know the Bulls arent getting the floor spacing they want with Keith Bogans starting at the shooting guard spot. With Rose driving to the basket, or dumping the ball in to Boozer on the low block, Korver can just run to his favorite spots along the 3-point line and wait to receive the kick out pass. Opposing defenders wont be so quick to double team with a dangerous shooter like Korver on the floor.
The obvious problem with this idea is what do you do with Korver on the defensive end? Trying to match him up against the likes of Dwyane Wade, Kobe Bryant and Ray Allen probably isnt the best idea. Against some teams, the Bulls could try to cross-match players on the defensive end with Luol Deng covering the opposing shooting guard and Korver defending the small forward spot. Again, Korvers lateral quickness might be an issue, but the Bulls are a help-defense team and I believe they could compensate for Korver getting beaten off the dribble on occasion.If the Bulls cant find a more meaningful role for Korver, maybe the front office should seriously consider trading him. We all know the Bulls would like to have another shooter on the floor with Rose, and if its not Korver, maybe they could turn his salary slot into an upgrade at shooting guard. Korver is making right around 5 million this season, and if you combined him with James Johnson or C.J. Watson, maybe you could acquire a potential starter at shooting guard like Torontos Leandro Barbosa, Denvers J.R. Smith or Charlottes Stephen Jackson.Ultimately, the Bulls are likely to be patient with Korver, and try to come up with ways to get him additional minutes. And, who knows, maybe a two week stretch of hot shooting will earn him consistent minutes in Thibodeaus rotation.ROSE SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTSMy partner on our Bulls Pre and Postgame shows, Kendall Gill, played 15 years in the NBA, and was known for his jumping ability and fastbreak slams. But even Kendall jumped off his seat Monday night watching Derrick Rose throw down that alley-oop pass from Ronnie Brewer. Rose continues to make new fans around the league every night, and hopefully that will be enough to earn him a starting spot for the Eastern Conference in next months All-Star game. You can vote for Derrick at NBA.com or Bulls.com.Thibodeau joined the growing list of NBA experts proclaiming Rose as a legitimate M.V.P. candidate this season. Hes the only player ranking among the top 10 in both scoring and assists. And, when you consider how hes had to carry the Bulls through the absence of Boozer, and now Joakim Noah, is there really a player whos done more for his team this season than Rose? We havent quite reached the halfway point of the season, but at this point, Rose has to rank with Amare Stoudemire, Deron Williams, Dirk Nowitzki and Chris Paul as the guys who are simply impossible to replace on their teams. Whether that translates into serious MVP consideration is another question, but Rose is now in full bloom as one of the NBAS brightest and most marketable stars.As always, we would love to hear what you think. Please post your comments on Korvers situation or Roses MVP candidacy in the section below. And, if youve got some trade ideas for upgrading the Bulls shooting guard situation, lets hear them!Mark Schanowski hosts our Bulls pre- and postgame studio coverage with 15-year NBA veteran Kendall Gill. You can also watch Mark on SportsNet Central, Sunday through Thursday at 6:30 and 10 p.m.

Making adjustments nothing new for new Bulls star Dwyane Wade

Making adjustments nothing new for new Bulls star Dwyane Wade

Dwyane Wade has always had eclectic tastes in threads, but considering the career adjustments he’s had to make, the 34-year old might decide to be a tailor when he hangs up his Way of Wade kicks.

Going from point guard to shooting guard after his rookie year? No problem.

Assuaging the sensitive ego of Shaquille O’Neal after O’Neal’s rocky breakup with Kobe Bryant? Child’s play.

Allowing LeBron James to take over his team and his city after two seasons where he averaged 28 points, seven assists, five rebounds and two steals? Sure, since it meant more rings.

Adjusting to his knees robbing him of his transcendent explosiveness? Excuse him while he walks to meet the media with both knees wrapped in ice — while wearing a smile.

Being introduced first, second or last? Doesn’t matter, as long as Tommy Edwards says “from Chicago” as a nod to Wade’s hometown roots.

So in making the biggest geographical change to date, moving back to Chicago after 13 years in Miami, Wade is prepared to shift again — even if it means being a 3-point shooter, even if it means playing different roles to suit the changing needs of this roster.

“My game translates anywhere,” Wade said after Wednesday’s morning practice, “I’ve played with so many different players before. I’m not worried about that. It’s me trying to understand offense, understand what we’re trying to do. Get to know my teammates. But I know where my sweet spot is, when to get aggressive, etc. One thing I’m trying to get used to is that 3-point shot is going to be open a little bit more for me, and coach is telling me to shoot it. That’s a little new era for me.”

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Bulls fans probably remember Wade hitting his share of devastating 3-pointers against them over the years, even though his 386 career makes only account for .05 percent of his made field goals.

There was the four-point play in Game 5 of the 2011 Eastern Conference Finals at the United Center when Wade’s Heat stormed back late to clinch a trip to The Finals. Very few can forget the heartbreaking, buzzer-beating running triple after a blindside steal from John Salmons in the 2008-09 season, so it’s not that he lacks the ability.

The Charlotte Hornets and Toronto Raptors found that out last spring when he hit 12 in 14 playoff games for the Heat.

“In the playoffs they take things away, right,” Wade said. “In the regular season, you play so many games teams sometimes don’t get a long time to prepare for you, so they may try and take one thing away.”

The logic was followed by a little hubris, earned considering he’s risen to such heights without having to rely on it.

“For me a lot of people have talked about me not shooting threes, but no one has been able to take away what I wanted to do. So why would I do something else?” Wade queried. “But then when you take it away I have the ability to knock it down. I’m not Doug McDermott. I’m not Niko (Mirotic). But I’m comfortable with the shot, and I’m going to shoot it. I know it’s going to be there, so I have a better chance of knocking it down. Coach has been on me about it.”

Wade will have to take the shot to keep defenses from sagging too far down on Jimmy Butler drives, and the hope is Butler goes back to shooting 38 percent from the long line as he did in 2014-15 as opposed to the 31 percent he shot last season.

For things to work in a potentially awkward situation, Wade has to be willing to step a little outside himself and seems prepared to.

“Normally I had to be the guy that would put it on the floor, but more so than that just pick my spots,” Wade said. “Understand when to be aggressive, but I’m a play-maker as well. I’m always looking to make plays for my guys.’’

Wade understands Fred Hoiberg’s offense is more equal opportunity than isolation-based but knows the instances will come when he must be the primary scorer — particularly late when he’s one of the league’s premier fourth-quarter scorers.

“Last year I averaged 19, the other 21.5. I can score, that's fine with me,” Wade said. “I'm willing to do whatever it takes. Scoring is one of those things that comes natural. It just depends on how high field-goal percentage I shoot. I'm not concerned about that. If coach wants me to score, then thank you.”

New tone set in Bulls training camp marked by role adjustments

New tone set in Bulls training camp marked by role adjustments

With eight new players and likely three new starters for the Bulls, an adjustment period of roles has started to take place in the opening days of camp.

Shot creators turn into shot makers.

Full-time ball handlers revert back to being part-time dominators.

First-time leaders are supplemented by experienced leaders who bring an instant credibility and speak with a bluntness that wasn’t as present last year—even from the coach.

A new tone of sorts was set when Dwyane Wade didn’t give the stock “nobody cares what happened last year” spiel after being asked if he wondered about what went wrong on the floor and off with the Bulls.

“You ask the guys that were here last year, how rotten it was,” Wade said. “You want to hear from their perspective, whatever it was last year from the standpoint of losing. You don't do that. I come from a different place and a different culture. Things are done differently different places. So I sat down and listened to guys.

“But the thing is, some of the things they talked about I know are not going to take place. Not while I'm here, not while (Rajon) Rondo's here, not while Jimmy (Butler) continues to grow as a leader.”

It adds light to some of the thoughts that Butler expressed after Tuesday’s first practice, and what anyone with a set of eyes could see last season when the Bulls looked like a fractured group that didn’t enjoy playing with each other anymore.

There wasn’t outright disdain, but some of the damaged relationships were never repaired as the season went on. Putting that into an alphabet soup with losing, bad habits and injuries and it spelled out “something’s gotta give.”

“You definitely gotta like each other. If you don’t, and you can say this doesn’t happen, but I feel like if you don’t like a guy you’re not going to pass him the ball,” said Butler, who had some rocky moments last season as a leader. “I think there’s a lot of liking on this team. Like I said, everybody wants everybody to be successful. Do we like each other too much? I hope so.”

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Refreshing honesty is a change at the Advocate Center, with Wade and Rondo being the adults in the room. The two have the latitude from Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg to stop practice to get on guys, and they did so Tuesday.

“You just want to cut down all the chatter; it’s early,” Rondo said. “Only a couple of guys should be talking in practice. As far as disrupting when they do stop practice, coach has the voice then assistant coach has the voice and then the other players.”

It’s not a surprise given Hoiberg won’t be one change his ways overnight, and having a player-run team are often the most successful, assuming everyone is on the same page.

It sort of speaks to Bulls vice president John Paxson’s statement on media day about the Bulls’ rebuilding their culture from the ground level.

“You talk about last year, but at the same time, last year doesn't matter,” Wade said. “We have a different core, and I think our culture is fairly different. We have guys now, Rondo's won a championship, I've won championships, we demand respect on the court. But we've got a lot of young guys as well, so they'll listen.”

Wade and Rondo have both said the Bulls are Butler’s team, but it doesn’t mean they’ll be wallflowers if they see things they don’t like. Wade has been a vocal leader in some form for the last decade and Rondo has rarely, if ever, held his tongue.

Rondo, along with being a primary facilitator for Butler to make scoring easier, imparted some wisdom to help Butler in his ever-evolving role as a leader.

“Not doing it with my mouth but with my actions, being consistent; I told Jimmy a leader can’t pick and choose when he wants to lead,” Rondo said. “He has to come out every day, every practice; we’re having two a days. If you are down, need something to get your head right, you have to bring it every day, every day.”

Hoiberg said there has to be a mutual respect amongst the team, which can lead to chemistry and camaraderie.

“It takes a lot of those moments when we all make mistakes and the coach is on us, that's when we come together,” Wade said. “In the locker room, when we're in there talking about anything, talking about whatever. it takes a lot of being on the road, traveling together. You're on a road trip, you go out dinner together. It's going to take a lot of moments to get the chemistry that we need.”