Boozer optimistic about Bulls' early success

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Boozer optimistic about Bulls' early success

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010
Updated 11:33 a.m.
By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

DALLASWith the third game of Chicagos seven-game November circus trip approaching Friday evening, the Bulls have had mixed results at 6-4 on the young season. One uniquely tuned-in observer, sidelined power forward Carlos Boozer, is optimistic about the teams progress.

Im not surprised. I know how hard these guys work, how hard we try to pay attention and get better every day. Im not surprised at how well weve done, said Boozer before Fridays team shootaround at the American Airlines Center. In my opinion, I thought that we could have a couple more wins under our belt. Im definitely impressed by my teammates, but Im not surprised. They work their butts off and theyre good.

Boozer, who is with the team throughout the arduous road trip, also discussed his own recovery from his broken right fifth metacarpal with reporters.

One day at a time. As long as it keeps improving, Ill be happy with that so, thats where Im going to leave it atI do a bunch of strengthening drills with some clay and then I do a couple of different exercises to get the muscles in between the fingers and then the hand to get stronger because my strength isnt there yet, explained Boozer, whose hard cast (It was on for four weeks, but it felt like forever, he quipped) was removed Nov. 2 and stitches were taken out Nov. 11. I ice it down, of course, so it doesnt flame up on me. And then I come out here and do dribbling, passing and shootingjust around the rim, like in the paint areaand ice it down again, let it keep healing.

Obviously where it came from, its a lot better than that. The splint is almost gone. Just try to get the pain out of it, he continued. It hadnt been moved in almost a month, so thats a reason there was a lot of pain there.

Boozer noted, in a silver-lining type of reasoning, that the injury hasnt affected his conditioning.

The great thing about my injury is Ive been able to run a lot and stay in shape as good as I can, so when I get back out there to practicehopefully very soon; maybe in a week, week and a half, Ill be able to practice sometime this week Im hopingI wont be too far behind, said the two-time All-Star power forward, who expects to have a specially-designed protective fitting for his right hand when the team arrives in Los Angeles this weekend. I know my body. Its a good mix. Im getting the doctors advice and he wants me to wait until the eight-week mark. Im trying to listen to him and at the same time, listen to my body. Im trying to wait to the eight-week mark to get out and practice and have full-contact practice, but Im starting to get a little anxious.

Often the first player on the court to encourage his teammates after timeouts, Boozer believes hell seamlessly fit into the Bulls lineup upon his return because of the chemistry hes developed with his new teammates, although his on-court time with them has been limited to the first week of training camp.

Itll be a little bit of an adjustment because we havent been out there together in a game, but itll be smooth. Itll be an easy transition. Its not going to be a tough transition, predicted Boozer. His role will be the same one when I signed on to come. Just being there, being a presence, bringing my leadership and help us win, whatever that means.

Boozer has also been a mentor of sorts to younger players on the squad, such as power forward understudy Taj Gibson, whos struggled through a miserable 1-for-16 shooting stretch over Chicagos past two games after starting out the season with remarkably high shooting numbers from the floor.

Every player goes through that. I just told him to hang in there and keep playing. I think every great player, every good player, everybody thats played basketball has had a slump at some point, so I told him to just keep his head up, dont keep your head down and just keep playing. The only way you get back on track is to keep fighting through moments like that, recounted Boozer. I really didnt know that much about Taj until I got here, to be honest. But when I got here, he was very talented, very skilled, way more athletic than I thoughthes super athleticgreat attitude and got a high motor, so Im looking forward to playing with him.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

The LeBron James vs. Michael Jordan debate tends to heat up around playoff time, and The King fueled the fire Thursday with his latest accomplishment.

After sinking a 3-pointer in the third quarter of Game 5 against the Boston Celtics, the four-time NBA MVP surpassed Jordan for most postseason points in league history with 5,989. Jordan scored 5,987 points in 179 games while it took James 212 to surpass that mark.

Before the game, James said that chasing Jordan has been a personal goal of his and left the debate to media members.

The SportsTalk Live panel talked about those comments, and joined in on the debate in the video above.

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

The deadline for underclassmen to pull their names out of the NBA Draft passed on Wednesday at midnight.

There were a few surprises, and a handful of decisions had an effect on how the Bulls will go about next month's draft.

Staying in the draft

Caleb Swangian, PF, Purdue: The sophomore All-American surprised many by keeping his name in the draft. Swanigan actually tested the waters after his freshman season but returned to the Boilermakers in 2016. He averaged 18.5 points, 12.5 rebounds and 3.0 assists in 35 games, earning Big Ten Player of the Year honors and was a National Player of the Year candidate. It's no secret the 6-foot-9 Swangian can score  - he had 15 games of 20 or more points - and showed some ability to shoot from deep, making nearly 45 percent of his 85 3-point attempts. Quickness and conditioning will be the real test for the 245-pound Swanigan, who has already lost significant weight since high school. Questions about his defense (he had just 27 steals and 36 blocks in two seasons) also stand out. With Nikola Mirotic's future in Chicago unknown, the Bulls could be in the market for depth at power forward. He wouldn't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14, but if he slides out of the first round he could be an option at No. 38.

D.J. Wilson, PF, Michigan: After averaging just 6.1 minutes as a sophomore, Wilson burst onto the scene as a junior, averaging 11.0 points and 5.3 rebounds in 30.4 minutes for the Wolverines. He did his best work during the postseason; during Michigan's Big Ten Championship run and Sweet 16 appearance, Wilson averaged 15.6 points on 54 percent shooting, 5.0 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. Standing 6-foot-10 with a 7-foot-3 wingspan, Wilson leaves some to be desired on the defensive end but has the ability to play as a combo forward - he had a 3-inch growth spurt after high school. Like Swanigan, Wilson won't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14 but could be a second-round option. He'd give the Bulls a similar look to what Bobby Portis does with a little more versatility on the wing.

Going back to college

Hamidou Diallo, SG, Kentucky: The NBA Draft's biggest mystery could have been a home-run selection for the Bulls in the first round. Alas, Diallo has decided to play a year under John Calipari at Kentucky and likely boost his draft stock. Having not played since December, where he played at a prep academy in Connecticut, so there wasn't much film of the 6-foot-5 leaper. Still, after Thon Maker went No. 10 to the Bucks last year there was thought that a team would take a gamble on a high-upside mystery.

Andrew Jones, PG, Texas: There was little surprise that Jones, a five-star recruit who put together a solid freshman season, returned. He's still a bit raw as a prospect despite having elite size (6-foot-4) and solid athleticism, and another year running the point with incoming five-star recruit Mo Bomba could really improve his draft stock. The Bulls clearly have a need at the point (less if Rajon Rondo returns) and if Jones had made the leap he likely would have been around at No. 38. Even still, Jones is a player to keep an eye on during next year's draft, assuming Cameron Payne and Jerian Grant don't make significant improvements.

Moritz Wagner, PF, Michigan: There's a need on every NBA team for a stretch forward with 3-point potential. But those teams will have to wait at least another year after Wagner decided to return to Michigan for his junior season. Like Wilson, who kept his name in the draft, Wagner had an excellent postseason run for the Wolverines. That stretch included a 17-point effort against Minnesota and a career-high 26-point outing in a win over Louisville. He weighed in at just 231 pounds and only averaged 4.2 rebounds per game, so adding some strength to his game will help his draft prospect for next year. He could have been an option for the Bulls at No. 38.