Boozer tending to ankle, won't play in Memphis

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Boozer tending to ankle, won't play in Memphis

Sunday, Jan. 16, 2011
Posted 3:15 PM Updated 6:23 PM

CSNChicago.com

Kyle Korver's game-winning 3-pointer to lead the Bulls to victory over the Miami Heat on Saturday night wouldn't have been made possible if not for Carlos Boozer's tipped ball to keep the play alive.

Unfortunately for the Bulls and Boozer, it came at a price.

The Bulls have confirmed that Boozer will not make the trip with the team to Memphis for Monday's game against the Grizzlies in order to remain in Chicago and get treatment on his injured left ankle.

The team does not know how long Boozer will be out. In his absence, Taj Gibson will return to the starting lineup and play alongside Kurt Thomas, who has filled in admirably for the injured Joakim Noah.

Boozer rolled his ankle in the process and was spotted leaving the United Center in a walking boot.

"When I hit the ground it was already on its side and all my weight came down on top of it," Boozer told the Tribune after Saturday's game. "It's pretty swollen right now, pretty bad."

Stay with CSNChicago.com for more information on this story as it becomes available.

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Bulls' Jimmy Butler mum on trade talk as deadline approaches

Bulls' Jimmy Butler mum on trade talk as deadline approaches

NEW ORLEANS—The trade talk is swirling and unavoidable, as it’ll be a topic of discussion through All-Star weekend as Jimmy Butler enters his third All-Star weekend and first as a starter.

Certainly not the only one who has to deal with such a thing, as Carmelo Anthony has a bigger mess on his hands with the Knicks and Sacramento’s DeMarcus Cousins is always mentioned as being in the periphery of changing addresses.

In his true politically-correct mode, Butler couldn’t decide if the constant trade talk was a compliment, a distraction or none of the above.

“I don’t know. I think that as long as somebody is reading, talking about something it makes for a great story,” Butler said at All-Star availability in New Orleans Friday afternoon. “I don’t know if I deserve to be traded? I don’t know. It’s not my job. It’s my job to play basketball to the best of my abilities.”

He took slight umbrage to the notion that the Bulls were a better team when Butler got there and before he emerged as an All-Star player compared to them hovering around .500 for the last two seasons.

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“So I should get worse and the team will be better?” he queried.

But there is a big school of thought that the return on a Butler trade will be better for the Bulls in the long run, as if he’s holding the development of the franchise back with his play.

The Boston Celtics are Butler’s biggest suitor but certainly haven’t put all their resources to the center of the table, leaving Butler dangling in a sense. A reporter who worked for the Celtics brought up the emergence of Isaiah Thomas, the NBA’s leading scorer, and called Thomas “a teammate” of Butler’s.

Knowing how the comment would be taken if it wasn’t corrected, Butler said Thomas was his teammate “this weekend” and not trying to speak any speculation into existence.

Although he spoke glowingly of Thomas when prompted, he wasn’t going to give any conversation any more real estate than necessary. He hears enough trade talk on the regular and it’s hard for even the best person to tune it out.

“I don’t pay attention to it. Obviously it comes up. Control what you can control,” Butler said. “You can’t control what people write, what people think should happen. Majority of the time, it doesn’t happen. Sometimes it does, majority of the time it doesn’t.”