Bulls 'defense a disaster' despite Noah's return

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Bulls 'defense a disaster' despite Noah's return

Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011
Posted 8:45 p.m. Updated 10:16 p.m.

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

TORONTO For James Johnson, revenge was sweet.

A day after getting traded to Toronto, the second-year forwards new team withstood a 19-point fourth quarter by Derrick Rose (32 points, 10 assists) and the Bulls (38-17) dropped a 118-113 contest against the Raptors (16-41) Wednesday night at the Air Canada Centre.

It felt good to win, said a beaming Johnson, who engaged in competitive banter with his former teammates throughout the contest. Just seeing their faces was priceless.

For Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau, however, the games result was no laughing matter.

WATCH: Thibodeau steamed after loss

"We gave up 118 points, offensively we scored more but defensively it was a disaster," said Thibodeau, whose Bulls allowed the Raptors to shoot 58.1 percent from the floor, as well as put up a season-high point total for opponents. We got into an offensive game, we tried to outscore them and thats a recipe for disaster. You've got to be ready to play and obviously we weren't, that's on me.

Its disappointing. Disappointing. Going on the road, you cant win like that, Thibodeau continued.

Carlos Boozer (24 points, six rebounds), who went for 34 points in the two teams last meeting at the Air Canada Centre, was a focal point for Chicago in the early going. Despite Amir Johnsons (17 points, four rebounds) countering him with quick cuts and tough finishes off feeds from Toronto point guard Jose Calderon (six points, 17 assists) in pick-and-roll scenarios, Boozers low-post presence was overwhelming in the early going.

Luol Deng (19 points), matched up with former teammate (as in the day before, when he was traded to the Raptors) Johnson (nine points, five rebounds, three blocked shots), showed his former protg starting in his Toronto debut and wearing a new number (zero), as well as a headband, which is forbidden by the Bulls there was good reason he was nailed to the bench in Chicago, as he had his way with Johnson, then continued his efficient scoring as the opening quarter continued.

With the return of Joakim Noah (seven points, 16 rebounds) the centers touch wasnt there, but he managed to grab a remarkable 10 rebounds in his eight-minute initial stint; he also struggled to defend versatile Raptors center Andrea Bargnani (24 points, eight rebounds) the visitors played at a faster tempo than they had as of late and after the first period, the Bulls held a 29-25 advantage.

WATCH: Noah critical of performance in return

Definitely not the result that I wanted, but weve just got to come with a better edge. Tough loss tonight, said Noah, who struggled to convert offensive rebounds. My timings a little off. Im a little tired.

Opined Thibodeau: He missed a lot of time. Hes rusty. His timing is not there. But weve got to get it done.

Boozer perhaps more sympathetic, as he also struggled after a long layoff; the Bulls were blown out by Orlando at the United Center in the power forwards December Bulls debut took a more positive stance regarding Noahs return.

Monster on the glass like normal, great presence in the paint for us and weve got to try to get him back in the groove, said Boozer. Its going to take him a few games to get his rhythm back. I think on defense, he was pretty good. Got a lot rebounds in a short period of time.

Chicagos second unit put the home team on its heels to start the second quarter, as a flurry of steals converted into layups by Ronnie Brewer (11 points, three steals) gave the Bulls a slight cushion.

Toronto, however, stormed back, with swingman DeMar DeRozan (24 points, four assists) finding his groove and reserves Sonny Weems (12 points), Ed Davis (nine points, five rebounds) and Leandro Barbosa (13 points) wreaking havoc off the bench.

Johnson, in fact, tied the contest at 43 with 4:17 left before halftime, when he threw down an alley-oop dunk from DeRozan in transition for his first points as a Raptor. Chicago regrouped and although the home team kept the pressure on, the Bulls went into the intermission with a 58-55 lead, mostly due to Boozers scoring late in the period.

Toronto made a game of it early in the third quarter, quickly knotting things up, subsequently taking the lead and scoring with enough regularity that Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau halted the proceedings to make defensive adjustments.

The torrid-shooting Raptors (their field-goal percentage rose to above 60 percent during this stretch) embraced their guests playing a quicker tempo and with Rose struggling from the floor, Chicago was fortunate their inferior hosts werent up by a larger margin.

Scoring contributions from both Johnsons, DeRozan, Bargnani and Davis mostly fueled by Calderons playmaking kept Toronto ahead by a comfortable margin, but Raptors turnovers late in the period again plagued them, allowing the Bulls to slice into the deficit. Through three quarters of play, the visitors trailed, 85-81.

Chicago continued to gradually close on the Raptors in the beginning of the final stanza, with Rose asserting himself offensively before taking his customary early fourth-quarter rest. Toronto let the Bulls stay within striking distance until approximately the midway point of the period, when they opened up a seven-point lead Weems was key during this stretch prompting Thibodeau to call a timeout with 6:14 remaining, shortly after Roses return.

It seemed as if the familiar story of Rose coming to the rescue would immediately take form a typically lightning-quick, acrobatic drive and finish momentarily quieted the enthusiastic ACC crowd but Toronto had other plans, as DeRozan and Barbosa scored timely buckets to give the home team some breathing room. Chicago countered with Boozer and his inside presence was again too much to handle, helping the Bulls narrow the gap.

Out of a timeout, Barbosa scored on a baseline drive and was fouled, completing the ensuing three-point play with 3:04 to play, making the visitors uphill battle even tougher. But consecutive successful trips to the line for Rose made it a one-possession and after a Raptors turnover, the All-Star point guard nailed an open three-pointer in transition to tie the contest at 107 apiece with 1:59 on the clock.

Following a Toronto timeout, DeRozan scored on a cutting layup, but Rose responded with a layup of his own on the next possession to even the count once again. DeRozan somehow got free off on a inbounds play out of a timeout; he was fouled while attempting a baseline dunk and hit two free throws to give the home team a 111-109 lead with 1:15 to play.

Someones beat, youve got to help, noted a frustrated Thibodeau. Were a help team, we guard with all five, we were a step behind on everything, we lacked discipline and when you lack discipline, its going to lead to all kinds of problems.

History repeated itself the next time down the court, as Rose was fouled on a driving layup. The third-year pro made both attempts to knot up the score at 111 with 1:05 left in the game, giving him 11 consecutive points.

The specific back-and-forth between Rose and DeRozan persisted when the Raptors swingman was fouled with 49.3 remaining and he knocked down a pair of foul shots. Rose was the first to blink, missing a jumper off the dribble.
Derrick Rose drives for a basket in the fourth quarter against Toronto. Rose scored 19 of his 32 points in the final stanza while attempting to lead the Bulls back from an eight-point deficit. (AP)
As impressive as Roses dominant performance down the stretch was, he admitted that his busy All-Star weekend affected him earlier in the contest.

I had to get in rhythm. Not really practicing in four days, then coming back and practicing for a day and a shootaround, it was hard. My shot wasnt there, my rhythm wasnt there and I wasnt trying to force shots, Rose explained. I was letting my guys really handle the game. Then, towards the end, thats when I was trying to get to the line and drive the ball.

Defensively, we just werent there. When we needed stops towards the end, we just couldnt get it and you know us, towards the end, thats where our defense really gets better. But tonight, we just didnt have it, he continued, describing where he felt the Bulls were lacking on this evening. If we would have stopped them at least one or two times towards the end, I think that we would have won this game, but offensively, I think we were there.

Toronto took advantage of the opportunity when Amir Johnson went to work in the post, converting a point-blank shot over Boozer with 16.6 seconds to go, giving the home team a 115-111 advantage. Amir Johnson then blocked a Rose layup attempt and James Johnson was fouled.

The former Bull split the pair of ensuing free throws and after Noah threw away the inbounds pass following a Chicago timeout, it was all academic, especially after Weems knocked down two foul shots to make a comeback virtually impossible.

I know everybody would think that my motivation was playing my former team that wouldnt give me minutes, but I would definitely say the opportunity - a team that wants to fight for you, to get you and have you playing right away, that just shows what kind of trust they have in my game and me, and thats what gave me the motivation, not to let them down, said Johnson, who learned he would start after the Raptors Wednesday afternoon shootaround.

The game felt just like Bulls practice, really. The hardest thing about todays game was not trying to outlet it to Derrick.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

The LeBron James vs. Michael Jordan debate tends to heat up around playoff time, and The King fueled the fire Thursday with his latest accomplishment.

After sinking a 3-pointer in the third quarter of Game 5 against the Boston Celtics, the four-time NBA MVP surpassed Jordan for most postseason points in league history with 5,989. Jordan scored 5,987 points in 179 games while it took James 212 to surpass that mark.

Before the game, James said that chasing Jordan has been a personal goal of his and left the debate to media members.

The SportsTalk Live panel talked about those comments, and joined in on the debate in the video above.

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

The deadline for underclassmen to pull their names out of the NBA Draft passed on Wednesday at midnight.

There were a few surprises, and a handful of decisions had an effect on how the Bulls will go about next month's draft.

Staying in the draft

Caleb Swangian, PF, Purdue: The sophomore All-American surprised many by keeping his name in the draft. Swanigan actually tested the waters after his freshman season but returned to the Boilermakers in 2016. He averaged 18.5 points, 12.5 rebounds and 3.0 assists in 35 games, earning Big Ten Player of the Year honors and was a National Player of the Year candidate. It's no secret the 6-foot-9 Swangian can score  - he had 15 games of 20 or more points - and showed some ability to shoot from deep, making nearly 45 percent of his 85 3-point attempts. Quickness and conditioning will be the real test for the 245-pound Swanigan, who has already lost significant weight since high school. Questions about his defense (he had just 27 steals and 36 blocks in two seasons) also stand out. With Nikola Mirotic's future in Chicago unknown, the Bulls could be in the market for depth at power forward. He wouldn't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14, but if he slides out of the first round he could be an option at No. 38.

D.J. Wilson, PF, Michigan: After averaging just 6.1 minutes as a sophomore, Wilson burst onto the scene as a junior, averaging 11.0 points and 5.3 rebounds in 30.4 minutes for the Wolverines. He did his best work during the postseason; during Michigan's Big Ten Championship run and Sweet 16 appearance, Wilson averaged 15.6 points on 54 percent shooting, 5.0 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. Standing 6-foot-10 with a 7-foot-3 wingspan, Wilson leaves some to be desired on the defensive end but has the ability to play as a combo forward - he had a 3-inch growth spurt after high school. Like Swanigan, Wilson won't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14 but could be a second-round option. He'd give the Bulls a similar look to what Bobby Portis does with a little more versatility on the wing.

Going back to college

Hamidou Diallo, SG, Kentucky: The NBA Draft's biggest mystery could have been a home-run selection for the Bulls in the first round. Alas, Diallo has decided to play a year under John Calipari at Kentucky and likely boost his draft stock. Having not played since December, where he played at a prep academy in Connecticut, so there wasn't much film of the 6-foot-5 leaper. Still, after Thon Maker went No. 10 to the Bucks last year there was thought that a team would take a gamble on a high-upside mystery.

Andrew Jones, PG, Texas: There was little surprise that Jones, a five-star recruit who put together a solid freshman season, returned. He's still a bit raw as a prospect despite having elite size (6-foot-4) and solid athleticism, and another year running the point with incoming five-star recruit Mo Bomba could really improve his draft stock. The Bulls clearly have a need at the point (less if Rajon Rondo returns) and if Jones had made the leap he likely would have been around at No. 38. Even still, Jones is a player to keep an eye on during next year's draft, assuming Cameron Payne and Jerian Grant don't make significant improvements.

Moritz Wagner, PF, Michigan: There's a need on every NBA team for a stretch forward with 3-point potential. But those teams will have to wait at least another year after Wagner decided to return to Michigan for his junior season. Like Wilson, who kept his name in the draft, Wagner had an excellent postseason run for the Wolverines. That stretch included a 17-point effort against Minnesota and a career-high 26-point outing in a win over Louisville. He weighed in at just 231 pounds and only averaged 4.2 rebounds per game, so adding some strength to his game will help his draft prospect for next year. He could have been an option for the Bulls at No. 38.