Bulls' patience in hectic times should pay off

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Bulls' patience in hectic times should pay off

Bulls management hasn't made waves in NBA free agency thus far the way some observers expected, and for that, fans of the team should be somewhat grateful.

While the departure of Kurt Thomas to Portland and Keith Bogans being unlikely to return to Chicago subtract two important, if underappreciated veterans from last season's cohesive, 62-win regular-season squad that advanced to the Eastern Conference Finals, at least the organization has generally steered clear of a bizarre post-lockout period that's already been wilder than Saturday's ugly Xavier-Cincinnati brawl.

While general manager Gar Forman didn't exactly deny the team's interest in acquiring disgruntled (or not?) Magic All-Star center Dwight Howard, the fact that detailed information of the organization's pursuit of the reigning three-time Defensive Player of the Year hasn't leaked means that either the front office is doing an excellent job of playing its cards close to the vest or Forman's claim of wanting to keep the club's nucleus together is accurate.

Besides, with the hullabaloo Howard has caused as of late--an alleged meeting in Miami with the Nets' braintrust, reportedly asking for a trade, insisting he'd prefer to remain in Orlando, but only if changes are made--is drama the Bulls can do without, especially at the risk of irritating speculated trade bait Joakim Noah and Luol Deng, among others, just before a season in which they are expected to be a title contender.

Instead, the focus has been on making less high-profile additions, such as veteran shooting guard Richard Hamilton, who was officially waived by the Pistons on Monday, is expected to sign for the mid-level exception--two years for 10 million--and should be in Chicago this week, likely by Wednesday. While Hamilton has declined from his past All-Star days, he offers a legitimate scoring threat next to Derrick Rose, championship experience, solid team defensive principles and allows Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau to keep the effective "Bench Mob" second unit intact.

Another subtle move made by management was re-signing Brian Scalabrine, a reliable locker-room presence and pseudo-assistant coach, to a non-guaranteed contract; the veteran forward reportedly settled his situation with FIBA after playing professionally in Italy during the lockout.

Most importantly, however, the Bulls will likely soon agree to terms with Rose, the youngest MVP in NBA history, on a five-year contract extension, made more lucrative as a product of his namesake rule, negotiated in the newly-ratified CBA.

Forget how the Bulls' patience, rather than rushing into an ill-advised bidding war for a mediocre crop of free agents (Hamilton is still at least close to the same level of many of the so-called top players at the position on the market), has already paid off; their wise choice to stay out of the chaotic mix to chase Howard--let alone Chris Paul (whose trade to a second L.A. team seemingly won't happen, this time because the league reportedly pushed the Clippers for one asset too many in promising young guard Eric Gordon for the NBA-owned Hornets; perhaps to encourage Paul to remain in New Orleans?) or Chauncey Billups (the floor general, amnestied by the Knicks, was snatched off waivers by the aforementioned Clippers, in the wake of the veteran's weekend comments to Yahoo about being frustrated by the situation), not that either of those players were options for Chicago--and virtually stand pat, assuming the Hamilton deal gets done and they add a veteran big man, so far looks to be a winner.

While teams like defending champion Dallas (adding productive veterans Lamar Odom, Vince Carter and Delonte West), New York (former Bulls center Tyson Chandler via the Mavericks, with the potential Cavaliers amnesty casualty Baron Davis looming), Miami (Shane Battier and a wild card in another ex-Bulls center, Eddy Curry) and even Indiana (underrated power forward David West, erstwhile Bulls talking point O.J. Mayo and draft-day acquisition George Hill) have certainly improved, the team with the league's top record last season--as Rose said Sunday, "Maybe people forgot"--will be just fine.

Fast Break Morning Update: Blackhawks win, Jimmy Butler starts All-Star Game

Fast Break Morning Update: Blackhawks win, Jimmy Butler starts All-Star Game

Here are some of Sunday's top stories in Chicago sports:

Jimmy Butler: 'Hopefully I’m not going to get traded'

Patrick Kane leads Blackhawks to win in Buffalo homecoming

What Joe Maddon wants to see next from Javier Baez

Jose Abreu ready for 2017 after season full of 'different challenges'

Wojnarowski: Bulls-Celtics Jimmy Butler trade talks 'will loom over the entire week'

After surreal offseason, Ben Zobrist comes to Cubs camp in style as World Series MVP

White Sox rookie Charlie Tilson out at least 10 days with foot injury

Fire score five goals for fourth preseason win

Simeon beats rival Morgan Park for city championship

Former Northwestern football player Torri Stuckey now focuses on helping others

Jimmy Butler: 'Hopefully I’m not going to get traded'

Jimmy Butler: 'Hopefully I’m not going to get traded'

NEW ORLEANS — Every All-Star isn’t created equal, even by the slimmest of margins as the best 24 NBA players take their turn on the midseason stage.

So Jimmy Butler being announced among the first five as an All-Star starter had to represent some form of validation, now that he’s not a novice at the whole experience and he’s able to go through the motions of the hectic weekend without breaking much of a sweat.

But despite being a three-time All-Star and routinely mentioned as one of the game’s top 15 players or even top 10, he can’t shake the trade rumors that have seemed to follow him since this time last season.

As he finished up his All-Star experience at Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, clarity was nowhere to be found—although heading to some tropical island for a couple days to actually unwind with clear water and warm air seemed to be the best therapy if he’s stressed by the uncertainty of the next few days.

“What’s Thursday? Oh, trade deadline,” Butler said. “I don’t know. I don’t know. Am I anxious? Come on, man. I don’t worry about it. It don’t bother or scare me none.”

“Hopefully I’m not going to get traded but I don’t know. I don’t control that. Control what I can control, like going on vacation.”

Surely it has to be frustrating for a guy who’s elevated his game yet again, averaging 24.5 points, 6.3 rebounds, 5.0 assists and 1.8 steals for the Bulls in 51 games. But he refuses to let it damper his All-Star spirits, playing with some of the best players in the world and a few guys he calls friends, like DeAndre Jordan and Kevin Durant.

“Not for me,” said Butler of the potential stress. “Not saying I’m untradeable but I don’t think about that. If I’m not in a Bulls uniform, I’ll give you a hug and say goodbye to you.”

Moments after Butler made his statement in the media room, the floodgates opened for the trade market as fellow Olympian DeMarcus Cousins was traded from the Sacramento Kings to the New Orleans Pelicans for what seemed to be mere fodder, pennies on the dollar for the most talented center in the NBA.

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While Cousins is far more of a handful than Butler could be, the trade almost signals a consistent truth that always bears repeating—that short of a select few, anybody can be traded.

Even a franchise altering talent like Cousins, who was traded to the city he was physically in for All-Star weekend, and included in the package of players was a guy who hit him in the groin last week (Buddy Hield), resulting in a Cousins outburst and ejection.

Butler has made his name with the Bulls, although not necessarily on the All-Star stage, a player who values defense and doesn’t have as much flash as some of the game’s shinier players.

With a six-point outing in 20 minutes, Butler was an on-court afterthought despite being a starter for the first time.

“Six? Should’ve gone for eight,” he sarcastically deadpanned.

In a relatively jovial mood through the weekend, Butler joked about the talk surrounding him and tried to brush it off as mere chatter as opposed to the franchise not seeing enough in him to make a firm commitment for the long-term, as the Boston Celtics are always hovering.

League sources expect the Celtics to engage the Bulls in conversations for the next few days, but nobody has a great feel for what either side is truly looking for.

But as Butler insisted, he’s only controlling what he can control, which is making himself a fixture for All-Star games to come as opposed to some of the first-timers who don’t know if they’ll get back here again.

“I think I got two underneath my belt,” Butler said. “I know what they’re feeling the first time, It’s so surreal like maybe I do belong here. That’s how I was thinking. Now it’s how do I get here every year? I think that’s the fun part, that’s the challenge. A lot of those guys have done it 10-plus years, hopefully I’m one.”

The only question seems to be, which uniform will it be in because the crazy season has begun.