Bulls' Rose vs. Clippers' Paul: Must-see on 1230

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Bulls' Rose vs. Clippers' Paul: Must-see on 1230

On Christmas Day, the Bulls will face the Lakers, where they will face a squad minus longtime stalwart Lamar Odom. It would be presumptuous to call the Lakers, featuring a new head coach in Mike Brown after Phil Jackson's retirement, a team in disarray. But after trading Odom to the defending-champion Mavericks for a nearly 9 million trade exception and failing to acquire Chris Paul in an attempted deal with the NBA-owned Hornets -- both the departed Odom and holdover Pau Gasol, who would have been shipped to the Rockets, reportedly took umbrage at the swap, as did veteran leader Kobe Bryant -- short of somehow acquiring Dwight Howard (which would likely require trading both Gasol and center Andrew Bynum to the Magic), the aging Lakers are now perceived as no longer one of the league's elite teams.

So while Derrick Rose won't face off with Paul in the season opener, he'll take on his fellow All-Star point guard on the Bulls' first road trip, when the team returns to Los Angeles on Dec. 30, before returning to Chicago in advance of the home opener New Year's Day at the United Center. Paul was dealt to the other tenants of the Staples Center, the Clippers, late Wednesday, in exchange for promising young shooting guard Eric Gordon, former All-Star center Chris Kaman, second-year small forward Al-Farouq Aminu and a 2012 first-round draft pick, courtesy of the Timberwolves.

The trade was finally consummated after the Clippers, like the Lakers, had their initial trade proposal -- which didn't feature Gordon, who averaged 23 points per game last season and is due to be a free agent next summer -- rejected by the league. Including Gordon, who is poised to be on the fringe of an All-Star Game berth, in the transaction was a high price to pay for the Clippers, who now have four point guards with Paul, the recently acquired Chauncey Billups (signed after being waived by the Knicks), incumbent starter Mo Williams (who was shipped to L.A. in exchange for Baron Davis, due to be amnestied by the Cavaliers, last season) and Eric Bledsoe, a second-year player currently out with a knee injury.

For former Bulls head coach Vinny Del Negro, there could be worse problems -- Billups could fill Gordon's void at shooting guard -- as reigning Rookie of the Year Blake Griffin at power forward, free-agent signee Caron Butler at small forward and re-signed athletic young center DeAndre Jordan (the Clippers matched the Warriors' four-year, 43-million offer sheet) is a potent frontcourt for the unselfish Paul to distribute to. The Clippers still have a long way to go before being taken seriously as a contending team, but based on their roster, anything short of a playoff berth would be a major disappointment.

When compared to the Clippers' big splash, the Bulls' shooting-guard saga, which resulted in Rip Hamilton signing a reported three-year, 15-million contract Wednesday, seems minor, regardless of the disparity of the two teams' respective situations entering the season. However, while the Bulls have an eye on a championship and the Clippers are just seeking respectability, one thing's for certain: Dec. 30, perhaps even more than the season opener, will be must-see TV.

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

The LeBron James vs. Michael Jordan debate tends to heat up around playoff time, and The King fueled the fire Thursday with his latest accomplishment.

After sinking a 3-pointer in the third quarter of Game 5 against the Boston Celtics, the four-time NBA MVP surpassed Jordan for most postseason points in league history with 5,989. Jordan scored 5,987 points in 179 games while it took James 212 to surpass that mark.

Before the game, James said that chasing Jordan has been a personal goal of his and left the debate to media members.

The SportsTalk Live panel talked about those comments, and joined in on the debate in the video above.

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

The deadline for underclassmen to pull their names out of the NBA Draft passed on Wednesday at midnight.

There were a few surprises, and a handful of decisions had an effect on how the Bulls will go about next month's draft.

Staying in the draft

Caleb Swangian, PF, Purdue: The sophomore All-American surprised many by keeping his name in the draft. Swanigan actually tested the waters after his freshman season but returned to the Boilermakers in 2016. He averaged 18.5 points, 12.5 rebounds and 3.0 assists in 35 games, earning Big Ten Player of the Year honors and was a National Player of the Year candidate. It's no secret the 6-foot-9 Swangian can score  - he had 15 games of 20 or more points - and showed some ability to shoot from deep, making nearly 45 percent of his 85 3-point attempts. Quickness and conditioning will be the real test for the 245-pound Swanigan, who has already lost significant weight since high school. Questions about his defense (he had just 27 steals and 36 blocks in two seasons) also stand out. With Nikola Mirotic's future in Chicago unknown, the Bulls could be in the market for depth at power forward. He wouldn't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14, but if he slides out of the first round he could be an option at No. 38.

D.J. Wilson, PF, Michigan: After averaging just 6.1 minutes as a sophomore, Wilson burst onto the scene as a junior, averaging 11.0 points and 5.3 rebounds in 30.4 minutes for the Wolverines. He did his best work during the postseason; during Michigan's Big Ten Championship run and Sweet 16 appearance, Wilson averaged 15.6 points on 54 percent shooting, 5.0 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. Standing 6-foot-10 with a 7-foot-3 wingspan, Wilson leaves some to be desired on the defensive end but has the ability to play as a combo forward - he had a 3-inch growth spurt after high school. Like Swanigan, Wilson won't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14 but could be a second-round option. He'd give the Bulls a similar look to what Bobby Portis does with a little more versatility on the wing.

Going back to college

Hamidou Diallo, SG, Kentucky: The NBA Draft's biggest mystery could have been a home-run selection for the Bulls in the first round. Alas, Diallo has decided to play a year under John Calipari at Kentucky and likely boost his draft stock. Having not played since December, where he played at a prep academy in Connecticut, so there wasn't much film of the 6-foot-5 leaper. Still, after Thon Maker went No. 10 to the Bucks last year there was thought that a team would take a gamble on a high-upside mystery.

Andrew Jones, PG, Texas: There was little surprise that Jones, a five-star recruit who put together a solid freshman season, returned. He's still a bit raw as a prospect despite having elite size (6-foot-4) and solid athleticism, and another year running the point with incoming five-star recruit Mo Bomba could really improve his draft stock. The Bulls clearly have a need at the point (less if Rajon Rondo returns) and if Jones had made the leap he likely would have been around at No. 38. Even still, Jones is a player to keep an eye on during next year's draft, assuming Cameron Payne and Jerian Grant don't make significant improvements.

Moritz Wagner, PF, Michigan: There's a need on every NBA team for a stretch forward with 3-point potential. But those teams will have to wait at least another year after Wagner decided to return to Michigan for his junior season. Like Wilson, who kept his name in the draft, Wagner had an excellent postseason run for the Wolverines. That stretch included a 17-point effort against Minnesota and a career-high 26-point outing in a win over Louisville. He weighed in at just 231 pounds and only averaged 4.2 rebounds per game, so adding some strength to his game will help his draft prospect for next year. He could have been an option for the Bulls at No. 38.