Hamilton eager for Lakers matchup

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Hamilton eager for Lakers matchup

For Rip Hamilton, playing against Kobe Bryant is nothing new. Not just because the two play the same position and Hamilton's been in the league for 13 years, but because the two go back to their high school days in suburban Philadelphia.

"I enjoy it," said Hamilton after Friday afternoon's Bulls practice, prior to departing for Los Angeles. "It's fun because we've known each other since we were 16, playing on the same AAU team, getting an opportunity to play in high school and the 2004 NBA Finals, and still get an opportunity to compete against each other."

While matching up with Bryant isn't an easy matchup for anyone, Hamilton's picked up a few pointers over the years to have at least a modicum of success against the perennial All-Star.

"Just make it tough, on both ends," he said about his childhood friend, who he'll face on Sunday's season opener. "Just as hard as you guard him, you've got to force him to guard you. So, it's fun. It's an exciting matchup."

Hamilton also isn't buying into the talk about Bryant's ailing wrist, an injury that the Lakers superstar vowed he'd play through.

"When the ball is thrown up, a lot of guys are able to tune that out, to go ahead and compete," he said. "You can't really look at that as a disadvantage."

As far as the Lakers as a group, Hamilton does see a difference from previous seasons, as versatile forward Lamar Odom was traded to the defending-champion Mavericks and heading into Sunday, they'll also be without center Andrew Bynum, who's suspended for the first four games of the regular season for a flagrant foul in the last playoffs.

"The last couple years, they've been so great off just how big they were, with, Odom, Gasol," Hamilton opined. "So without Bynum, I know for them, it's going to be tough. But they'll adjust. They're a veteran team."

But regardless of the opponent, Hamilton is just happy to be back on a team worthy of playing in one of the league's showcase games, a Christmas Day matinee.

"It feels good to be back in a situation where people want to see you play and you've got a special chance to have a special season," he said. "It's the first game of many and we just want to be prepared to go out and try to get a win."

Bulls fail to show up against 76ers

Bulls fail to show up against 76ers

It's been said and proven that the Bulls can't handle any level of prosperity in this season of tumult, but they've apparently lowered the bar even more as they were unable to handle the thought of prosperity.

Taking a 10-point lead against the 10-man Philadelphia 76ers had the United Center buzzing with unselfish play, easy shots and Rajon Rondo wizardry. About 90 minutes later the slipper fell off Cinderella and life hit the Bulls hard in their 117-107 loss, as they failed to win their second game in a row for the first time in a month. 

76ers rookie Dario Saric led the brigade with 32 points and 10 rebounds on 12 of 19 shooting, with two triples. Five 76ers scored in double figures, including an undrafted big named Shawn Long scoring 18 points and seven rebounds in his 10th NBA game.

Jimmy Butler scored 36 with 11 assists and seven rebounds in 42 minutes, but the narrative was the same as he didn't have enough help on the offensive end for long stretches.

More importantly, it again signaled the reality that the belief this team can make a run for the playoffs with the schedule being the easiest of the contenders over the next two weeks is a fallacy—if the first 70 games is any indication.

If the Bulls can't take care of business against the likes of these 76ers, they can't be counted on do much against anybody, regardless of how the schedule shakes out for the last six games.

By the time the United Center faithful was on its third cycle of boos when a Bulls turnover led to them having more points in the paint than the Bulls had on the scoreboard, it was clear the night had turned for the worst and wouldn't be turning again.

They already had a 54-52 paint-to-total ratio and the Bulls committed just three fouls, meaning for all the 76ers activity, the Bulls didn't even touch them or give any consequences by making them earn it at the foul line.

The lead ballooned to 26 at 81-55 with 6:15 left in the third and the Bulls looked as lifeless as they had at any point, given the relative lack of competition.   They made a game of it, although the insertion of Anthony Morrow seemed to indicate a white flag more than a search for new energy.

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Morrow and Bobby Portis gave Butler the help he desperately needed with a surge that cut the deficit to 102-92 with seven minutes remaining—giving the Bulls a better than expected chance to salvage an improbable comeback.

But with the margins so thin and Butler already expending so much energy just to get the Bulls back in it, they couldn't do more than threaten as Saric probably earned a few extra rookie of the year votes with his career performance.

The Bulls defense, through, was far less than inspiring. The 76ers lived in the paint with guard penetration, scoring 40 in the paint in the first half alone. Sergio Rodriguez, Gerald Henderson and the rest of the perimeter players feasted on the Bulls as Robin Lopez and Joffrey Lauvergne were missing in action, leading Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg to leave both on the bench for the majority of the second half.

And with this sobering bit of reality, one wonders where the Bulls truly go from here.

A Day in the Life of Windy City Bulls players Will Bynum and Alfonzo McKinnie

A Day in the Life of Windy City Bulls players Will Bynum and Alfonzo McKinnie

Ever wonder what the daily routine is for guys grinding to get to the NBA?

CSN Chicago's Scott Changnon, Ryan McGuffey and Pat Gostele followed Windy City Bulls players Will Bynum and Alfonzo McKinnie to find out. 

Although the two play on the same team, Bynum and McKinnie are on opposite sides of the spectrum. Bynum, a former point guard for the Detroit Pistons, is looking for one last taste in the association. McKinnie, on the other hand, is an upstart Chicago native who needed to prove himself through a D-League tryout. 

Both have found success in Hoffman Estates, though. Bynum is leading his younger teammates by teaching them how to achieve success, while putting up a respectable 14 points and 6.5 assists per game. McKinnie, a Wisconsin Green-Bay product, has went from a questionable roster spot to starting, averaging 14.8 points on 51 percent shooting. 

Watch the video above as both Bynum and McKinnie provide great insight into a day in the life of an NBA D-Leaguer.