Jimmy Butler joins Love, Jordan, Pippen, Rose, others as All-NBA Bulls

Jimmy Butler joins Love, Jordan, Pippen, Rose, others as All-NBA Bulls

Jimmy Butler was named to the All-NBA Third Team on Thursday. Here's a look at the seven other players who have been named to an All-NBA team in the Bulls' 51-year franchise.

Bob Love (Second team: 1971, 1972)

The first member of the Bulls to appear on an All-NBA team, Love's two nods came in the same years he was named to two of his three All-Star games. In 1971, Love averaged 25.2 points and 8.5 rebounds in 43.0 minutes per game. It also coincided with the first winning season in Bulls franchise history (51-31), though they lost in seven games to the Los Angeles Lakers. The following year Love averaged a career-best 25.8 points for the 57-win Bulls.

Norm Van Lier (Second team: 1974)

Stormin' Normal took his game to a new level in 1974, averaging 14.3 points, 4.7 rebounds and 6.9 assists in nearly 36 minutes per game. He was named to his first of what would become three All-Star Games, and ended the year on the second team. The Bulls won 54 games, knocked off the Pistons in seven games before being swept by the Milwaukee Bucks in the conference finals.

Michael Jordan (Second team: 1985; First team: 1987-1993, 1996-1998)

It didn't take MJ long to find his name on an All-NBA team. In his rookie season Jordan was named to the second team, becoming the first rookie since Larry Bird (1980, first team) to accomplish the feat. Jordan took second team honors behind Magic Johnson and Isiah Thomas. Jordan missed all but 18 regular season games the following season with a broken foot.

Then the rest became history. Jordan was named All-NBA First Team the following 10 seasons in which he played the entire year. From 1987 to 1993 Jordan led the NBA in scoring all seven seasons, led the NBA in steals three times and minutes played twice. The Bulls, of course, won their first three titles and Jordan cemented himself as the game's best player. After skipping the 1993-1994 season to try his hand at baseball, Jordan returned late in the 1995 season for 17 games.

From 1996 to 1998 he was back at the top of the mountain, winning three titles and being named to the All-NBA First Team in each season. Had he not taken the two-year hiatus there's a real chance Jordan would have become the first (and still only) player to make the All-NBA First Team in 12 consecutive seasons (LeBron James, Karl Malone and Kobe Bryant are the only others to do so).

Scottie Pippen (Second team: 1992, 1997; Third team: 1993; First team: 1994-1996)

MJ's sidekick had already been named to one All-Star game before he found his name on an All-NBA squad. In 1992 he averaged 21.0 points, 7.7 rebounds and 7.0 assists. At the time he was just the seventh player in NBA history to reach those thresholds. He bumped down to the third team in 1993 as his numbers dipped some, but he still managed to average 18.6 points, 7.7 rebounds and 6.3 assists as the Bulls won their third of three straight titles.

When Jordan bolted for minor league baseball, Pippen took over and was named First Team All-NBA both seasons. He averaged 21.7 points, 8.4 rebounds and 5.4 assists for the Bulls in those years. When Jordan returned in 1996 Pippen was still red-hot and was again named All-NBA First Team, joining Jordan. It'd be the last time teammates shared First Team honors until 2002, when Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal did so.

In 1997, Pippen was named to the All-NBA Third Team. He averaged 20.2 points, 5.2 rebounds and 5.8 assists. He likely would have added to his total in 1998, but a toe injury forced him to appear in just 44 regular season games during the Bulls' final title run.

Derrick Rose (First team: 2011)

The Bulls went 13 years without a player on any All-NBA team, let alone the first team. But Derrick Rose's MVP campaign was certainly worthy of finding his name on the list. Rose appeared in 81 games, averaging 25.0 points, 4.1 rebounds and 7.7 assists and leading the Bulls to 61 wins and the top seed in the Eastern Conference. Though it seemed unthinkable at the time, 2011 would be the lone time Rose was named to an All-NBA team.

Joakim Noah (First team: 2014)

The face of the Bulls franchise had a truly remarkable 2014 season. He made his second All-Star team that year, carrying a Bulls team to 48 wins by averaging 12.6 points on 48 percent shooting, 11.3 rebounds and 5.4 assists per game. The assists were the most by a center in NBA history in a single season, and on top of that he also won Defensive Player of the Year. Knee and shoulder injuries ruined the following two seasons for Noah, and he appeared in just 46 games in his first season with the Knicks in 2016-17.

Paul Gasol (Second team: 2015)

The Bulls' free-agent splash had a resurgence in his first year in Chicago, averaging 18.5 points, 11.8 rebounds and 1.9 blocks in 35 minutes per game. He played in 78 games, the most for him since 2011, and was named an All-Star. A weak crop of centers certainly helped Gasol out in being named to the Second Team, but his numbers were impressive all the same after the Spaniard looked to be on the tail end of his illustrious career.

Jimmy Butler (Third team: 2017)

Were it not for Butler playing the deepest position in the NBA, he may have been named to the Second Team. That's how good his numbers were - especially playing for a Bulls team that had little else around him. Butler averaged 23.9 points, 6.2 rebounds and 5.5 assists, and single-handedly carried a banged up and (at times) dysfunctional Bulls team to the postseason.

Jimmy Butler's trainer is certainly not happy about trade

Jimmy Butler's trainer is certainly not happy about trade

No hard feelings from Jimmy Butler's camp, right? 

Wrong. 

Not long after the three-time All-Star was traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves, his trainer broke Twitter. 

 

It's not explicit, but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out who Gaines was tweeting about. More so, Gaines sent the harsh takedown from France, where he presumably is vacationing with Butler. 

It was reported that Butler wanted to stay in Chicago. TNT's David Aldridge even detailed that he rebuffed the opportunity to re-sign with the Cleveland Cavaliers if he was traded there. 

Obviously, emotions are running high. 

Scouting report: What the Bulls are getting in newly acquired Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn

Scouting report: What the Bulls are getting in newly acquired Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn

The Bulls have entered their rebuilding phase, dealing Jimmy Butler to the Timberwolves for Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick, which became Arizona power forward Lauri Markkanen. Time will tell what Markkanen becomes as a stretch forward/center but he certainly was worthy of the selection. LaVine and Dunn had been with the Timberwolves since they were drafted, and give the Bulls two versatile options in a backcourt that will look far different than it did a year ago.

Here’s what the Bulls are getting in the two former Timberwolves guards:

LaVine, a two-time NBA Dunk Contest champion, was having a career year before he suffered a torn ACL on Feb. 3. Playing a bigger role in his second season under Thibodeau, LaVine averaged 18.9 points on 46 percent shooting and shot a respectable 39 percent from deep on 6.6 attempts per game, 16th most in the NBA.

LaVine is known for him thunderous dunks, but that athleticism allowed him to shoot nearly 64 percent at the rim last year, per basketball-reference. He’s a scorer first and foremost, topping 25 or more point 10 different times in those 47 games. He went for 40 points in a late December loss to the Kings. He also had five or more assists on eight different occasions, so he’s able to distribute the ball as well. He’s a true combo guard who should finally give Fred Hoiberg some backcourt flexibility.

The Bulls got a firsthand look at LaVine’s skill set in December when he went for 24 points, six rebounds and six assists in a win over the Bulls at the United Center. He shot 10-for-18 and made a few key shots over Dwyane Wade late to seal the game. It was part of a stellar 16-game stretch between November 23 and December 23 when LaVine averaged 23.6 points and 3.5 assists.

He flirted with 50/40/90, shooting 49 percent from the field, 40 percent from deep and 88 percent from the line. He did all this, of course, playing behind Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins. While that gave LaVine more one-on-one situations as defenses dealt with his two budding star teammates, shots were hard to come by until LaVine asserted himself and worked him into a featured role in the offense.

LaVine had ACL surgery on February 14 and spoke about his recovery in late May, saying “everything is going well.” LaVine said at that time he was only allowed to run on an anti-gravity treadmill, and there’s still no timetable for his return to the court. A source told Insider Vincent Goodwill LaVine is “training softly.”

Dunn has plenty of work to do to show he can compete at the next level. Though he only played one season, his rookie campaign under Thibodeau was one to forget. The No. 5 pick in the draft averaged 3.8 points and 2.4 assists in 17.1 minutes per game. He played in 78 games behind Ricky Rubio, although he did lose some playing time to Tyus Jones late in the season.

Dunn’s shooting is his biggest weakness. In terms of true shooting percentage, which takes into account 3-point shots and free throws, Dunn was second-to-last in the NBA last year with a 43.2 percent mark. He shot just 38 percent from the floor, 29 percent from beyond the arc and 61 percent at the free-throw line.

For his season-long struggles he did look good in the second half of the year. After the All-Star break he improved his percentages to 40.4/33.3/77.8 and had a handful of impressive games. He had 11 points and seven assists against the Lakers and followed it the next night with a career-best 17 points against the Blazers. In the season finale he handed out 16 assists to go with 10 points, the first double-double of his career.

Where it’s clear he excels is taking care of the ball. His 1.1 turnovers were seventh fewest among point guard who averaged at least Dunn’s 17 minutes per game. He’s ready to facilitate, but he’ll need to score at a higher and more efficient clip to earn playing time.

Where both fit into the Bulls is a question for now. The Bulls have a decision to make with Rajon Rondo and whether to pick up his team option for next season. The Bulls traded for both Jerian Grant and Cameron Payne in the last calendar year, and Isaiah Canaan is under contract for another year. On the wing, LaVine will replace Butler and get as much run as he can handle. With only Denzel Valentine and Anthony Morrow available at shooting guard, LaVine is in line for a big role from Day 1. He’s also in the last year of his rookie contract so the Bulls will be looking to extend him sooner than later.