Chicago Bulls

Jimmy Butler joins Love, Jordan, Pippen, Rose, others as All-NBA Bulls

Jimmy Butler joins Love, Jordan, Pippen, Rose, others as All-NBA Bulls

Jimmy Butler was named to the All-NBA Third Team on Thursday. Here's a look at the seven other players who have been named to an All-NBA team in the Bulls' 51-year franchise.

Bob Love (Second team: 1971, 1972)

The first member of the Bulls to appear on an All-NBA team, Love's two nods came in the same years he was named to two of his three All-Star games. In 1971, Love averaged 25.2 points and 8.5 rebounds in 43.0 minutes per game. It also coincided with the first winning season in Bulls franchise history (51-31), though they lost in seven games to the Los Angeles Lakers. The following year Love averaged a career-best 25.8 points for the 57-win Bulls.

Norm Van Lier (Second team: 1974)

Stormin' Normal took his game to a new level in 1974, averaging 14.3 points, 4.7 rebounds and 6.9 assists in nearly 36 minutes per game. He was named to his first of what would become three All-Star Games, and ended the year on the second team. The Bulls won 54 games, knocked off the Pistons in seven games before being swept by the Milwaukee Bucks in the conference finals.

Michael Jordan (Second team: 1985; First team: 1987-1993, 1996-1998)

It didn't take MJ long to find his name on an All-NBA team. In his rookie season Jordan was named to the second team, becoming the first rookie since Larry Bird (1980, first team) to accomplish the feat. Jordan took second team honors behind Magic Johnson and Isiah Thomas. Jordan missed all but 18 regular season games the following season with a broken foot.

Then the rest became history. Jordan was named All-NBA First Team the following 10 seasons in which he played the entire year. From 1987 to 1993 Jordan led the NBA in scoring all seven seasons, led the NBA in steals three times and minutes played twice. The Bulls, of course, won their first three titles and Jordan cemented himself as the game's best player. After skipping the 1993-1994 season to try his hand at baseball, Jordan returned late in the 1995 season for 17 games.

From 1996 to 1998 he was back at the top of the mountain, winning three titles and being named to the All-NBA First Team in each season. Had he not taken the two-year hiatus there's a real chance Jordan would have become the first (and still only) player to make the All-NBA First Team in 12 consecutive seasons (LeBron James, Karl Malone and Kobe Bryant are the only others to do so).

Scottie Pippen (Second team: 1992, 1997; Third team: 1993; First team: 1994-1996)

MJ's sidekick had already been named to one All-Star game before he found his name on an All-NBA squad. In 1992 he averaged 21.0 points, 7.7 rebounds and 7.0 assists. At the time he was just the seventh player in NBA history to reach those thresholds. He bumped down to the third team in 1993 as his numbers dipped some, but he still managed to average 18.6 points, 7.7 rebounds and 6.3 assists as the Bulls won their third of three straight titles.

When Jordan bolted for minor league baseball, Pippen took over and was named First Team All-NBA both seasons. He averaged 21.7 points, 8.4 rebounds and 5.4 assists for the Bulls in those years. When Jordan returned in 1996 Pippen was still red-hot and was again named All-NBA First Team, joining Jordan. It'd be the last time teammates shared First Team honors until 2002, when Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal did so.

In 1997, Pippen was named to the All-NBA Third Team. He averaged 20.2 points, 5.2 rebounds and 5.8 assists. He likely would have added to his total in 1998, but a toe injury forced him to appear in just 44 regular season games during the Bulls' final title run.

Derrick Rose (First team: 2011)

The Bulls went 13 years without a player on any All-NBA team, let alone the first team. But Derrick Rose's MVP campaign was certainly worthy of finding his name on the list. Rose appeared in 81 games, averaging 25.0 points, 4.1 rebounds and 7.7 assists and leading the Bulls to 61 wins and the top seed in the Eastern Conference. Though it seemed unthinkable at the time, 2011 would be the lone time Rose was named to an All-NBA team.

Joakim Noah (First team: 2014)

The face of the Bulls franchise had a truly remarkable 2014 season. He made his second All-Star team that year, carrying a Bulls team to 48 wins by averaging 12.6 points on 48 percent shooting, 11.3 rebounds and 5.4 assists per game. The assists were the most by a center in NBA history in a single season, and on top of that he also won Defensive Player of the Year. Knee and shoulder injuries ruined the following two seasons for Noah, and he appeared in just 46 games in his first season with the Knicks in 2016-17.

Paul Gasol (Second team: 2015)

The Bulls' free-agent splash had a resurgence in his first year in Chicago, averaging 18.5 points, 11.8 rebounds and 1.9 blocks in 35 minutes per game. He played in 78 games, the most for him since 2011, and was named an All-Star. A weak crop of centers certainly helped Gasol out in being named to the Second Team, but his numbers were impressive all the same after the Spaniard looked to be on the tail end of his illustrious career.

Jimmy Butler (Third team: 2017)

Were it not for Butler playing the deepest position in the NBA, he may have been named to the Second Team. That's how good his numbers were - especially playing for a Bulls team that had little else around him. Butler averaged 23.9 points, 6.2 rebounds and 5.5 assists, and single-handedly carried a banged up and (at times) dysfunctional Bulls team to the postseason.

Bulls reach buyout agreement with Dwyane Wade

Bulls reach buyout agreement with Dwyane Wade

Dwyane Wade's Bulls career is set to end just over a year after it began.

According to the Chicago Tribune's K.C. Johnson, the Bulls and Wade have reached an agreement on a buyout.

CSN Chicago's Vincent Goodwill confirmed the report.

Wade signed a two-year, $47.5 million deal with the Bulls last July and averaged 18.3 points, 4.5 rebounds and 3.8 assists per game in 60 games with the Bulls. This summer, Wade exercised his player option for the second year of the contract, worth $23.8 million.

Wade picked up his option just two days before the Bulls traded Jimmy Butler on draft night and went into rebuild mode. According to Goodwill, Dwyane Wade is giving back $8.5 million.

The Bulls will go into next year without any of the 'Three Alphas' the team had last year Wade, Butler and Rajon Rondo.

The news comes a day before Bulls Media Day, which will be live on CSN at 2:30 p.m., and on the same day the team agreed to a two-year deal with Nikolia Mirotic.

Wojnarowski also reported Cleveland, San Antonio, Miami and Oklahoma City are the contenders to sign Wade.

Bulls bring back Nikola Mirotic on two-year deal

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USA TODAY

Bulls bring back Nikola Mirotic on two-year deal

The Bulls and Nikola Mirotic ended their summerlong impasse by agreeing to a two-year, $27 million deal on the eve of training camp, sources tell CSNChicago.com.

Mirotic was a restricted free agent and was at risk of not being at Media Day Monday had he and the Bulls not come to an agreement, but the sides came away with a deal both will probably say is advantageous. Mirotic has a no-trade clause in the first year of the deal and the second season is a team option according to sources, preserving the big cap space the Bulls have when Dwyane Wade's $23.8 million contract comes off the books.

Mirotic and his representatives were looking for an offer sheet in the $16-17 million range when free agency first began, hoping the Bulls would match on what was expected to be a boom market.

But the boom went bust very quickly and free agent money dried up, leaving Mirotic with a $7.2 million qualifying offer the Bulls seemingly weren't budging from. But the Bulls reversed course, apparently relenting on the qualifying offer to sweeten the deal, which also helps the Bulls get to the salary floor for the coming season.

Mirotic's tenure with the Bulls has been tantalizingly frustrating after a promising finish to his rookie season in 2014-15. Unable to put together consistent stretches under Fred Hoiberg, there was question as to if Mirotic fit in the short-term plans, let alone the big picture as the Bulls are gearing up for a long rebuild.

But letting the 6-foot-10 Mirotic go was a little too much for the front office to stomach, as they appear to hold onto the slightest bit of hope Mirotic can develop into a versatile scorer without having the burden of big pressure around him. Unfortunate circumstances and injuries have played a part in Mirotic's inconsistencies, as he's played considerably better after the All-Star break in his three seasons. 

If not, they can cut bait with Mirotic after the season and start over, yet again.