Signs of optimism after Wednesday's meetings?

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Signs of optimism after Wednesday's meetings?

Don't get your hopes up just yet, but as representatives of the league and the players' association resumed labor negotiations Wednesday in New York, various media reports are suddenly showing signs of optimism in regards to a potential end to the NBA lockout.

A league source, on the condition of anonymity, confirmed to CSNChicago.com that progress was made in talks between the league and the union.

It was widely expected that the NBA would announce the cancellation of another two weeks of regular-season games Tuesday. Instead, in addition to talks continuing, various players--including league MVP Derrick Rose and LeBron James--reportedly opted to not participate in the star-studded World All-Star Classic, scheduled to begin Sunday in Puerto Rico. Some observers are interpreting the decisions as a sign that an end to the lockout is somewhat imminent.

At the same time, a New York Times report revealed that two arenas--Chicago's United Center and Los Angeles' Staples Center--have scheduled events on dates previously earmarked for NBA games, although assurances were reportedly made that the games can be rescheduled if and when the lockout ends.

With the cancellation of the first two weeks of the season, the NBA schedule would have to be reworked and certain dates," said, in part, a statement released by the league and published in the Orange County Register, a Southern California newspaper. "Including Dec. 13 for a Lakers game at Staples Centerwould not be part of any revised schedule."

In both cities, the dates will now accommodate concert dates for rapper Jay-Z and Windy City native Kanye West. The Chicago stop of the tour will take place Nov. 30, a night when the Bulls would have hosted the San Antonio Spurs.

Meanwhile Rose, who is currently in Hawaii on a USO-sponsored "Hoops for Troops" tour, continued his recent trend of speaking out about labor issues, this time tackling the salary cap.

"I wish it was back like where it was in the old days where there wasn't a cap," the Bulls All-Star point guard told reporters Tuesday. "Back in the day, they were giving guys coming out of college with multimillion-dollar contracts, so why stop it now? The game is growing. There's no need to stop it."

An outspoken Rose again expressed his take on the ongoing work stoppage, echoing comments he made in Chicago during events related to the release of his new signature sneaker.

"Greed is not on our the players' side," he said. "We're not greedy. What they're the owners trying to do to us is dead wrong.

"The most difficult part is, every day you wake up and you see games canceled," he continued. "The fans are fiending for it. I know we're itching to play. And I know that it'll hurt the game because our fans are loyal and for us not to be playing, I think it'll hurt them more.

"I put a lot of work into my game. I take my basketball life very serious. That's just my life," the youngest MVP in NBA history went on to say. "For people to still talk negative about you, I think that's just life, period. You just go with it. But I feed off of it."

Rose also commented on his experience with the troops in Hawaii.

"They're around my age and younger than I am," he said. "Just seeing that they're fighting for us, I just let them know we're not taking them for granted.

"Supporting our nations military community has always been important to me. Whether I am extending my thanks to our troops on the front lines, visiting military families back at home, playing ball with wounded warriors, or participating on USO tours like this that are designed to uplift the spirits of those stationed around the globe, it is an honor for me anytime I am able to give."

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

LeBron James breaks Michael Jordan's record by becoming NBA's all-time leading playoff scorer

The LeBron James vs. Michael Jordan debate tends to heat up around playoff time, and The King fueled the fire Thursday with his latest accomplishment.

After sinking a 3-pointer in the third quarter of Game 5 against the Boston Celtics, the four-time NBA MVP surpassed Jordan for most postseason points in league history with 5,989. Jordan scored 5,987 points in 179 games while it took James 212 to surpass that mark.

Before the game, James said that chasing Jordan has been a personal goal of his and left the debate to media members.

The SportsTalk Live panel talked about those comments, and joined in on the debate in the video above.

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

Swanigan's, Diallo's decisions and how it affects Bulls' NBA Draft

The deadline for underclassmen to pull their names out of the NBA Draft passed on Wednesday at midnight.

There were a few surprises, and a handful of decisions had an effect on how the Bulls will go about next month's draft.

Staying in the draft

Caleb Swangian, PF, Purdue: The sophomore All-American surprised many by keeping his name in the draft. Swanigan actually tested the waters after his freshman season but returned to the Boilermakers in 2016. He averaged 18.5 points, 12.5 rebounds and 3.0 assists in 35 games, earning Big Ten Player of the Year honors and was a National Player of the Year candidate. It's no secret the 6-foot-9 Swangian can score  - he had 15 games of 20 or more points - and showed some ability to shoot from deep, making nearly 45 percent of his 85 3-point attempts. Quickness and conditioning will be the real test for the 245-pound Swanigan, who has already lost significant weight since high school. Questions about his defense (he had just 27 steals and 36 blocks in two seasons) also stand out. With Nikola Mirotic's future in Chicago unknown, the Bulls could be in the market for depth at power forward. He wouldn't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14, but if he slides out of the first round he could be an option at No. 38.

D.J. Wilson, PF, Michigan: After averaging just 6.1 minutes as a sophomore, Wilson burst onto the scene as a junior, averaging 11.0 points and 5.3 rebounds in 30.4 minutes for the Wolverines. He did his best work during the postseason; during Michigan's Big Ten Championship run and Sweet 16 appearance, Wilson averaged 15.6 points on 54 percent shooting, 5.0 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. Standing 6-foot-10 with a 7-foot-3 wingspan, Wilson leaves some to be desired on the defensive end but has the ability to play as a combo forward - he had a 3-inch growth spurt after high school. Like Swanigan, Wilson won't be an option for the Bulls at No. 14 but could be a second-round option. He'd give the Bulls a similar look to what Bobby Portis does with a little more versatility on the wing.

Going back to college

Hamidou Diallo, SG, Kentucky: The NBA Draft's biggest mystery could have been a home-run selection for the Bulls in the first round. Alas, Diallo has decided to play a year under John Calipari at Kentucky and likely boost his draft stock. Having not played since December, where he played at a prep academy in Connecticut, so there wasn't much film of the 6-foot-5 leaper. Still, after Thon Maker went No. 10 to the Bucks last year there was thought that a team would take a gamble on a high-upside mystery.

Andrew Jones, PG, Texas: There was little surprise that Jones, a five-star recruit who put together a solid freshman season, returned. He's still a bit raw as a prospect despite having elite size (6-foot-4) and solid athleticism, and another year running the point with incoming five-star recruit Mo Bomba could really improve his draft stock. The Bulls clearly have a need at the point (less if Rajon Rondo returns) and if Jones had made the leap he likely would have been around at No. 38. Even still, Jones is a player to keep an eye on during next year's draft, assuming Cameron Payne and Jerian Grant don't make significant improvements.

Moritz Wagner, PF, Michigan: There's a need on every NBA team for a stretch forward with 3-point potential. But those teams will have to wait at least another year after Wagner decided to return to Michigan for his junior season. Like Wilson, who kept his name in the draft, Wagner had an excellent postseason run for the Wolverines. That stretch included a 17-point effort against Minnesota and a career-high 26-point outing in a win over Louisville. He weighed in at just 231 pounds and only averaged 4.2 rebounds per game, so adding some strength to his game will help his draft prospect for next year. He could have been an option for the Bulls at No. 38.