After sweep, Zambrano's talking retirement again

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After sweep, Zambrano's talking retirement again

Thursday, Sept. 16, 2010
Updated 12:34 AM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

ST. LOUIS There was Carlos Zambrano sitting with his teammates, laughing at the Ace Ventura movie playing in the clubhouse. And there was Zambrano dancing by his locker, singing a Bob Marley song.

No one knows for certain if this peace will last, or if the suspension and anger-management counseling he received will become a turning point in his career. But hes already thinking about the end.

Just as Zambranos again performing like the elite pitcher the Cubs thought he would be, he again talked about retirement after Wednesdays 7-3 victory over the Cardinals, which capped their first three-game sweep in St. Louis in more than 22 years.

This will be my last contract. I dont think I will be playing anymore (after that), Zambrano said. Life is short, believe me, and sometimes you miss very important people, like my daughter.

Sometimes you miss things in life because of baseball you shouldnt miss. I want to be there for my daughter. I dont want anything to happen, especially in my family. Baseball, believe me, takes a lot of time from us.

Zambrano made similar noise about walking away from the game after earning his 100th win last year in Cincinnati. The 29-year-old has two more seasons guaranteed on his 91.5 million deal, plus a vesting player option for 2013 that is dependent upon where he finishes in the Cy Young voting the next two seasons.

It appeared completely out of reach when Zambrano was sent to the bullpen early in the season, and after he got in Derrek Lees face on June 25 and alienated himself from his teammates.

But Zambrano is 6-0 with a 1.59 ERA in his seven starts since rejoining the rotation, which is what the Cubs thought they were paying for when he signed that big contract in August 2007.

Theres a calmness right now, manager Mike Quade said. He seems in charge both on the mound and off the mound. He pitches with emotion you know that. But hes just handling things as well as Ive seen. Instead of trying to figure out why, I just tip my hat and say, Good for you.

Three nights at Busch Stadium and the Cubs (65-81) beat a legitimate Rookie of the Year candidate (Jamie Garcia), a 2010 All-Star (Adam Wainwright) and a Cy Young Award winner (Chris Carpenter).

Zambrano pitched better than them all in front of the 41,145 fans who watched playoff hopes vanish for the Cardinals (74-70).

Zambrano went six innings and allowed two runs one earned on a night where he saw his velocity at 88, 89 mph on the radar gun. He was mixing his slider and curveball, showing he can get outs without blowing the ball by hitters.

You roll along with a career for five, six, seven years, Quade said, and all of a sudden things get a little tough. You got adjustments to make if you want to keep playing.

Zambrano said he was serious about the retirement promise. He was philosophical about how different his season might have been if the Cubs didnt try to convert him into an eighth-inning reliever, saying things happen for a reason.

And he seemed reflective when he had to leave the team last month to visit his nephew in intensive care at a hospital back home in Venezuela.

Zambrano took his time before meeting with the media late Wednesday night, but every five days he always seems to have something interesting to say. "My agent always tells me Im unique," he said as postgame interview ended, and theres no arguing that point.

I want to enjoy the game as much as I can the next two, three years on my contract, Zambrano said. A friend of mine one time told me that any time Im batting, I look excited, I look happier than when Im pitching. I want to mix it up. (I) want to have the same joy, the same motivation I have when Im hitting.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Five more years: Theo Epstein signs massive contract extension with Cubs

Five more years: Theo Epstein signs massive contract extension with Cubs

PITTSBURGH — Theo Epstein understood the optics of how he once escaped Fenway Park in a gorilla suit, walking away from his dream job with the Boston Red Sox. Winning two World Series titles couldn’t stop the personality conflicts or the competing agendas or an epic collapse at the end of the 2011 season.

But Epstein never wanted to make that kind of power play here, not with the Cubs on the verge of what could be a historic run through October and a potential dynasty, not after leaving the Boston bubble and feeling a sense of renewal in Chicago, where his young family lives a few blocks from Wrigley Field.

Epstein signing a massive five-year contract extension seemed inevitable, no matter that it took until Sept. 28 for the Cubs to finally make the announcement.

While $50 million guaranteed is said to be an overestimate, it’s believed to be in the team president’s range, given the bonus potential — presumably through metrics like attendance and playoff appearances — and the sense that Andrew Friedman’s deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers could be worth $45 million.

“There was never any real drama,” chairman Tom Ricketts said Wednesday, sitting in PNC Park’s visiting dugout before a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. “Honestly, we sat down in spring training, had a nice dinner and talked about it. I basically told him I thought he was the best in the game at what he did. And he told me that no matter what I paid him, he wasn’t going to leave Chicago, so we were off to a good start.”

After a series of meetings through the summer, Epstein and Ricketts hammered out the final details over the weekend inside the team’s Wrigleyville headquarters and initially planned to hold the press conference on Sunday, but that felt wrong once they found out Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez died in a boat crash, leaving the industry in mourning.

Epstein’s contract does not include an equity stake in a franchise now valued at more than $2 billion. Two of his closest advisors — general manager Jed Hoyer and scouting/player-development chief Jason McLeod — will also get extensions through the 2021 season.

“When we had dinner in spring training, (Tom) started it off by saying some really nice things about me that might have hurt his leverage a little bit,” Epstein said. “And then I returned the favor by telling him that even if we couldn’t work out a contract, it would get awkward because I would still just keep showing up to work as an employee at will, ruining my leverage, so that was a nice way to start the negotiation. Really, the entire process reflected that spirit.”

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It hasn’t been an uninterrupted honeymoon period since Epstein bolted from Boston and signed a five-year, $18.5 million contract in October 2011. The Epstein regime fired three managers before hiring Joe Maddon, who used an out-clause that triggered when Friedman left the Tampa Bay Rays for Los Angeles after the 2014 season. The Cubs continually faced questions about spending like a big-market team — signing Jon Lester to a $155 million megadeal that winter required financial gymnastics and using money left over from losing the Masahiro Tanaka sweepstakes.

But from the ashes of a 101-loss season in 2012, the Cubs methodically built a 101-win team this year through: executing shrewd trades for an All-Star first baseman (Anthony Rizzo), All-Star shortstop (Addison Russell), last year’s Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) and an emerging ace (Kyle Hendricks); drafting a leading MVP candidate (Kris Bryant); and going on a free-agent spending spree that approached $290 million (John Lackey, Ben Zobrist, Jason Heyward, Dexter Fowler).

“They’ve given me great freedom to operate within baseball operations,” Epstein said of the Ricketts family. “They’ve given me the resources that we’ve needed to make this baseball operation healthier and thrive. It’s everything I could have ever asked for. So there’s no place I’d rather be. I think I said five years ago it’s a great day to be a Cub. I still feel that way. I still envision feeling that way for the foreseeable future.”

In leaving the Red Sox, Epstein quoted football legend Bill Walsh, referencing his belief that coaches and executives shouldn’t spend more than a decade in one job, or else risk burnout or becoming stale.

“I don’t know” if this will be the last contract in Chicago, Epstein said. “It was 10 years in Boston, and that certainly seemed like the right amount of time there. I do really believe in a lot of what Walsh was writing about.

“But it’s too early to judge. We’ll see how I feel at that point. Certainly, there’s some symmetry to 10 years. But it’s just too early. So many things can happen between now and then. I’m really not thinking beyond trying to win a World Series for this organization.”

When Epstein first met Ricketts in New York at the family’s spectacular residence overlooking Central Park, the Cubs had just lost 91 games, the second of five straight fifth-place finishes — and the beginning of what could be a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

“A lot of people have this perception — I know I was sort of in that camp — that he was more of a deeply quantitative number-cruncher kind of guy,” Ricketts said. “And that’s true. Obviously, Theo understands numbers. He understands how to apply them to make good decisions.

“But I think the thing that I’ve seen the last five years — which is even more remarkable — is how well he handles people. How well he chooses players for his team — and his ability to judge character and put together the right human resources together on the same team — has been truly remarkable.”

12 Days of Cubs: The complete list

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12 Days of Cubs: The complete list

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