All-out in center: Byrd's Gold Glove chase

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All-out in center: Byrd's Gold Glove chase

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010
11:04 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SAN DIEGO Theres a purple welt around Marlon Byrds right eye, and a red spot inside it, the perfect image to sum up his first season in a Cubs uniform, which often winds up covered in dirt or stained by another dive across the grass.

This bruise lingers from a foul ball that bounced near home plate and drilled into his sunglasses last weekend at Wrigley Field. There the crowds like his hustle, the way he sprints around the bases after hitting a home run.

This year the players voted Byrd an All-Star for the first time in his career at the age of 32 and after spending time on the Triple-A level in seven of his previous eight seasons.

Ryan Dempster watched Byrd track down several balls on Tuesday night in the wide canyons of PETCO Park where its at least 400 feet to left-center and right-center and lobbied for his teammate to be recognized for his defensive play.

I hope he wins a Gold Glove because he deserves it, Dempster said afterward. Hes played as good a center field as anybody Ive seen through the 157 games weve played. And (its) not just those kind of catches. (Its) everything he does. He throws to the right base and hits the cutoff guy. He gets the ball in quickly.

As a pitcher, especially when youre playing in big ballparks like this, you just say let them hit it and he goes and gets it.

Managers or their staffer whos handed the ballot will decide the Gold Glove vote. Mike Quade cant vote for his own player, but believes Byrd belongs in the National League conversation with Philadelphias Shane Victorino, Houstons Michael Bourn and Pittsburghs Andrew McCutchen.

All three of those guys run a little better than Marlon, Quade said, and yet still with his reads off the bat (and) his angles hes so consistent with what he does out there.

Baseballs intelligence departments are still trying to figure out how to accurately measure defensive performance. Entering Wednesday Byrd had made only three errors, which translated into a .992 fielding percentage. That compares favorably to Victorino (.995), Bourn (.992) and McCutchen (.986).

Using ultimate zone rating a more advanced metric that shows the number of runs above or below average a fielder is Byrd grades out at 10.5. The website FanGraphs separates the outfielders like this: Victorino at -2.2; Bourn at 14.3; and McCutchen at -10.7.

This is more subjective, but baseball people have noticed how Byrd doesnt take plays off. On the day he was named to the All-Star team, he made a diving catch in the ninth inning with his team trailing the Cincinnati Reds by 11 runs.

Hes oblivious when it comes to effort, Quade said. The score (doesnt) matter (and) youre going to see him leave his feet no matter what the situation is. Thats who he is.

That max-out style has to wear on a players body, and Quade has described Byrd as banged up at various points during the final weeks of the season. Byrd hit .317 with nine homers and 40 RBI before the All-Star break, and .267 with three homers and 23 RBI since then.

Byrd seems to recognize this and late Tuesday night deflected the credit to Dempster after a 5-2 victory over the San Diego Padres.

Demps just hitting spots, Byrd said. I know where to go, so hes making me look good out there. Thats why I pride myself on defense, (because) youre not always going to hit.

The next night Byrd played in his 149th game, and he intends to end this season the way it began. Even with the Cubs spiraling out of contention, he has refused any chances to be removed from the lineup.

I dont need to take days off to finish up a season, Byrd said. I have a little old-school mentality because of the guys I grew up with in the system over in Philly. Those guys play every single day, so I expect to do the same. You cant take anything for granted in this game. You never know when its going to be your last (one), so play it all-out.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs down to only one All-Star starter in voting update

Cubs down to only one All-Star starter in voting update

The Cubs are down to only one starter in next month's All-Star Game in Miami: reigning MVP Kris Bryant.

Jason Heyward lost his grip on the final starting outfielder spot to Marlins star Marcell Ozuna in the latest All-Star balloting update released by the MLB:

That may be for the best, as the Cubs are currently banged up (Heyward. Ben Zobrist and Kyle Hendricks are on the disabled list) and slogging through a season where they've hovered around .500. So maybe four days off in a row would be beneficial for the defending champs.

Heyward is 29,270 votes behind Ozuna and Zobrist is 118,248 votes behind Heyward. It appears as if Washington's Bryce Harper and Colorado's Charlie Blackmon are sure things for the top two outfielder spots in the NL.

Bryant is only 58,082 votes ahead of Nolan Arenado at third base. Anthony Rizzo trails Ryan Zimmerman at first base, Javy Baez comes in well behind Daniel Murphy at second base and Buster Posey has more than twice as many votes as runner-up Willson Contreras at catcher.

Addison Russell is third among shortstops. Kyle Schwarber — despite being demoted to the minors last week — is eighth among NL outfielders.

It's a far cry from 2016, when the Cubs made up all four infield spots in the NL starting lineup.

Voting ends in four days. Fans can head to MLB.com to vote.

If Nationals are playoff preview, what should Cubs do at trade deadline?

If Nationals are playoff preview, what should Cubs do at trade deadline?

WASHINGTON – Cubs pitching coach Chris Bosio has perspective after sitting through the darkest days of the rebuild, the sign-and-flip cycles and moments like “Men Playing Against Boys,” the way ex-manager Dale Sveum once sized up the team during a 2012 series against the Washington Nationals.

Bosio trusted future “World’s Greatest Leader” Theo Epstein, general manager Jed Hoyer and the rest of a growing front office would deliver talent during the 101-loss season that led to the Kris Bryant No. 2 overall draft pick and the Ryan Dempster/Kyle Hendricks buzzer-beater deal at the trade deadline.   

So while Bosio is a hardened realist who understands the banged-up Cubs haven’t played up to their potential, he also knows these are first-division problems. 

“If Theo and Jed can find a way to make our team better, you can bet they’re going to do it,” Bosio said. “But at the same time, they’re not going to sacrifice our future. They know that the team (here has) a lot of holdovers from the World Series club. There’s a lot of holdovers from the team that went to the National League (Championship Series in 2015). We’ve been through that. And when it comes crunch time, we produce.”

With that in mind, a look at where things stand five weeks out from the July 31 trade deadline as the defending champs begin a potential playoff preview on Monday at Nationals Park:

• If Max Scherzer flirts with another no-hitter or a 20-strikeout game on Tuesday, the questions will start all over again about adding a hitter. Javier Baez even let this slip over the weekend after a win over the Miami Marlins: “Pretty much not having a leadoff guy right now is kind of tough.” But shipping Kyle Schwarber to Triple-A Iowa is not necessarily the start of an offensive overhaul.

“Our focus is going to be on pitching,” Hoyer said. “I would never say never to something like that, because I don’t know what’s going to present itself as we get closer to the deadline. I will say this: When it comes to our offense, I really do see it as these are our guys. We’re as deep with position players as any team in baseball. These guys have performed exceptionally well. Most of these guys have won 200 games over the last two years.

“We believe in them for a reason. We don’t have rings on our fingers without all these guys.”

• With Jake Arrieta and John Lackey on the verge of becoming free agents, the Cubs feel like they should start working on their winter plans this summer and begin remodeling the rotation. The 38-37 record makes you wonder how ultra-aggressive the front office will be to win a bidding war for a frontline starter, but the Cubs are only 1.5 games behind the Milwaukee Brewers, a first-place team for now that was supposed to be rebuilding this year.   

But the Cleveland Indians got to the 10th inning of a World Series Game 7 with Trevor Bauer, Josh Tomlin and Ryan Merritt making nine playoff starts combined, because they had Corey Kluber and a dynamic bullpen.

The primary focus will have to be on the rotation, but adding another high-leverage reliever to work in front of lights-out closer Wade Davis would shorten games and help preserve Carl Edwards Jr. (170 pounds) and Koji Uehara (42 years old).   

“At some point, you’re going to assess your own team,” Hoyer said. “Sometimes strengthening a strength can work. You see teams that sometimes have a good offense – and add another good hitter – and all of a sudden we’re going to beat you in a different way.”

• Without making this summer’s blockbuster deal for a closer – the way the Cubs landed Aroldis Chapman – Washington risks wasting Bryce Harper’s second-to-last season before free agency and another year of Scherzer’s $210 million megadeal.

Six different Nationals have saved games for a 45-30 team and the bullpen ranks near the bottom of the majors with a 4.88 ERA. Can’t blame that on Dusty Baker, who has notched more than 1,800 wins as a manager and guided four different franchises to the playoffs.

But it won’t be easy to find a quick fix for the Washington bullpen or Cubs rotation. The American League opened for business on Monday with only three of its 15 teams more than three games under .500, and one being the White Sox, who are (obviously) not seen as a realistic trade partner for the Cubs.

“The American League is incredibly jumbled up,” Hoyer said. “That’s why a lot of deals don’t happen this time of year, because people are still sorting it out. The next five weeks of baseball will determine a lot of that. Some of those teams that are in the race now will fall back.

“There’s a lack of teams right now that have a true sense of sellers. I think there are a lot of teams right now that are close enough that they’re not going to admit it that they’re going to be sellers. That five weeks will determine a lot about who ends up on which side of the fence.”