Already a Cubs legend, Kyle Schwarber laughs off the critics of his outfield defense

Already a Cubs legend, Kyle Schwarber laughs off the critics of his outfield defense

MESA, Ariz. – The legend of Kyle Schwarber began here during a pre-draft meeting with Cubs executives Theo Epstein and Jason McLeod three years ago. 

The Indiana University baseball team had traveled to Arizona for the Pac-12-Big Ten Challenge and worked out at the new spring-training complex. The Cubs got a sit-down interview with "Bash Brothers" Schwarber and Sam Travis, a Providence Catholic High School graduate who's now a top prospect in the Boston Red Sox organization. 

Up in an office, Schwarber told his future bosses: "It really f------ pisses me off when people say I can't catch."

That pretty much sums up Schwarber's attitude now that the questions keep coming about his outfield defense.

"Oh yeah, it's still the same," Schwarber said. "That's just how I am as a person. I've always been raised on: Don't let anyone tell you that you can't do something." 

Like when the draft gurus view you as a reach with the fourth overall pick, or the medical experts call it a season-ending injury after a full-speed collision. This is someone who blasted five playoff homers during his first full season in professional baseball, and put up a .971 OPS in the World Series, roughly six months after major reconstructive surgery on his left knee.

But the Cubs could really set the bar at: Don't crash into your center fielder. The combination of Albert Almora Jr. and Jon Jay will be a defensive upgrade over Dexter Fowler. Schwarber doesn't have to be Jason Heyward in left field when he's crushing the ball into the Allegheny River. The Cubs are actually looking at places where Schwarber can start in right field – like PNC Park during that 2015 wild-card game – and sub out for a late-game defensive replacement.   

So, no, the Cubs aren't exactly worried about a step back on that side of the ball after leading the majors in defensive efficiency.

"I think our defense is going to be as good this year," general manager Jed Hoyer said. "I think Kyle had two bad games at the wrong time on a big stage in 2015. He was fine out there the rest of the time. We're just excited to get his bat in the lineup. We're excited to have his makeup in the lineup every day.

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"His outfield defense – the concerns are more from people who only watched him on the national stage. He was fine in '15. We know Almora and Jay are both really good defenders. Otherwise, the defense on our team is going to be the same around the diamond. I think we'll be really good again defensively."

Schwarber's lowest defensive moments came against a team from the media capital of the world. But getting swept by the New York Mets had been a team-wide breakdown in every phase of the game, the Cubs never leading at any point during that National League Championship Series. 

"You get a label," Schwarber said. "That's just the general conception whenever you're a new player and you hit national TV and then you have a hiccup or two. 

"But I laugh at it. I think it's funny. That's just what happens. I can't be too worried about it. I'm not going to let that change the way I feel about being an outfielder. I feel like I make good plays out there. 

"Any outfielder's going to make a mistake. And if I'm going to make a mistake, it's going to be an aggressive mistake. It's not going to be a passive mistake."   

Remember how Dave McKay once coached up Alfonso Soriano and helped turn him into a competent outfielder. The Cubs aren't trying to develop the next Andre Dawson here. At this point, why would anyone bet against Schwarber?

"A couple years ago, there was some negative stuff said about him (and) I think that was totally unfounded," manager Joe Maddon said. "He had a couple tough plays (and) everybody encounters a moment where they don't make the right decision, diving (and) the ball (gets by you).

"I'm confident with him. The leg's good. He runs better than you think, even with that brace on. He knows good routes. He throws well. I think he's going to really surprise a lot of people that have been down (on him), because I think he's going to be a really good outfielder."

Preview: Cubs-Nationals Monday on CSN

Preview: Cubs-Nationals Monday on CSN

The Cubs take on the Washington Nationals on Monday, and you can catch all the action on CSN and live streaming on CSNChicago.com and the NBC Sports App.

Coverage begins with Cubs Pregame Live at 6 p.m. Then catch first pitch with Len Kasper and Jim Deshaies. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on Cubs Postgame Live.

Monday’s starting pitching matchup: Eddie Butler (3-2, 4.19 ERA) vs. Gio Gonzalez (7-1, 2.96 ERA)

Click here for more stats to make sure you’re ready for the action.

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— Latest on the Cubs: All of the most recent news and notes.

Honda Road Ahead: Can Cubs slow down Nationals bats?

Honda Road Ahead: Can Cubs slow down Nationals bats?

CSN's David Kaplan and David DeJesus discuss the upcoming matchups in this edition of the Cubs Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland & NW Indiana Honda Dealers.

Maybe a four-game series with the N.L. East-leading Washington Nationals will help the Cubs take off. 

It did last year. 

The Cubs swept the Nats early last season, boosting themselves into first place in the National League - a position they wouldn't relinquish. More than a sweep, though, a positive series is vital for a team that continues to hover around .500. 

To do so, Joe Maddon's pitchers must somehow slow the Nationals offense, which has managed to push across more runs than any team in the majors. 

After D.C., the Cubs are off to Cincy for a three-game set with the Reds. 

Watch David Kaplan and David DeJesus preview the upcoming matchups in the video above.