Angel Guzman doesnt live with regrets

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Angel Guzman doesnt live with regrets

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
6:30 PM
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. As good as Carlos Zambrano, the Cubs say when they look back on what Angel Guzman used to be.

That seems like a lifetime ago, but coming up through the system, the Cubs were high on two pitchers from Venezuela. One now has a guaranteed 91.5 million contract, while the other is working on a minor-league deal.

At the age of 29, Guzman does not view that as unfair, or wonder about what might have been. Eleven months after arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder, he is focused on throwing batting practice on Wednesday, for the first time all over again.

I never paid attention to that at all when I was younger, Guzman said. I wouldnt change anything. I would do it the same way (as Im) doing it right now. Just keep it simple (be) a humble guy and just live in the reality.

Guzman was a pitcher the Cubs could dream about. Perceptions started changing in 2003, when Dr. James Andrews operated on Guzmans shoulder to repair a small tear in the back of his labrum. That was right around the time he should have been playing in the All-Star Futures Game.

My first look at him was like: Oh my God, said Cubs manager Mike Quade, who watched Guzman in camp and had him at Triple-A Iowa. And there were a lot of moments in his career in between the injury issues where thats what you saw. He was an exciting young prospect, for sure: Stuff, stature, a tall (kid with) good life (on his pitches). There were a lot of things to like.

Andrews, one of the most famous names in sports medicine, would also perform Guzmans Tommy John surgery in 2007, as well as the procedure last March. By then, everything was closing in on Guzman. He was already recovering from knee surgery, and dealing with the loss of his brother, who was murdered last year in Venezuela.

Its one of the cruelties of the game, Quade said. Hes a guy you root for, a long shot, (but) Ive played a few of those and cashed.

All this has given Guzman remarkable perspective. He spent all last season in Arizona, fighting the loneliness by working out in the brutal desert heat. Hes feeling better, but through experience knows that this will be a slow process.

Guzmans shown that he can do the job he posted a 2.95 ERA in 55 games out of the Cubs bullpen in 2009 but the Cubs cant count on him because of those medical records. His goal is to leave Mesa by May if everything goes the right way and head to a minor-league affiliate.

They want me to come back and every single guy in this clubhouse is showing me support, Guzman said. Its something that you really have to appreciate. (The Cubs) have been waiting for me for so long. Its something that really motivates you to become a better person, a better player, a better teammate.

Guzman became a free agent this offseason, and could have signed elsewhere, but returned to the organization hes been a part of since the Clinton administration.

The Cubs will keep giving him chances until he finally breaks down and really cant pitch anymore. And then theyll want to hire him to work in their player-development department. Because hed be a strong voice to talk straight with the Latin kids and the pitchers who think they already have it all figured out.

For Guzman, this gets tiresome, because with each injury its the same answers to the same questions. And against the odds, he tries to maintain the same positive outlook.

If youre really into the sport, it gets you, Guzman said, but (it makes you) stronger.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

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AP

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

The sports world woke up to some tragic news on Sunday morning.

Former major leaguer Andy Marte and Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura were both killed in separate car accidents in the Dominican Republic within an hour of each other, according to multiple reports. A Royals representative confirmed the death of 25-year-old Ventura.

The Cubs and White Sox took to Twitter to give their condolences:

Ventura was a member of the Royals from 2013-16 and won a World Series title in 2015 with Ben Zobrist and Wade Davis, who the Cubs acquired this offseason for Jorge Soler. Ventura also played with White Sox pitcher James Shields in 2013-14.

Marte, 33, played a majority of his seven-year career with the Cleveland Indians. He was teammates with Todd Hollandsworth (Atlanta 2005), Kerry Wood (Cleveland 2009-10), and Miguel Montero (Arizona 2014).

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Theo Epstein's front office is heading into Year 6 with the Cubs and they're finally talking about a pitcher as one of the organization's most exciting prospects.

That's how senior vice president of scouting and player development Jason McLeod framed his Dylan Cease report to fans at the Cubs Convention at the Sheraton Grand Chicago last weekend.

It was a tongue-in-cheek summation from McLeod after he spent the previous few minutes fawning over Cease, the Cubs' sixth round pick in 2014.

Of course, McLeod and the Cubs can poke fun at the lack of impact pitching the farm system has developed when the homegrown position players like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber just helped lead the franchise to its first World Series championship in over a century.

Cease, however, has been one of the more intriguing Cubs prospects for years — a right-handed pitcher capable of touching 101 mph on the radar gun.

"This guy is throwing lightning bolts out of his arm," McLeod said. "It's really exciting. But we also understaned he's only in Low-A this year, so he's far away."

The Cubs expect Cease to pitch for Class-A South Bend in 2017 after spending last season pitching for short-season Eugene and the 2015 campaign working in the rookie league in Arizona.

Cease — who just turned 21 in late December — put up some impressive numbers at both stops in the Cubs system, posting a 2.36 ERA and 1.165 WHIP to go along with a whopping 91 strikeouts in 68.2 innings. He also only surrendered one homer and walked more batters (41) than reached via a basehit (39).

Control is obviously an issue for Cease, but the upside is evident.

"He's so far away," McLeod said. "He's gonna go into 2017 as a starter. As with a lot of young guys, it's gonna come down to command and depend on that third pitch and the ability to land them for strikes.

"It's a special arm. He can pitch 95-100 mph with a big power curveball. He's unlike anyone else we have in our system since we've been here in terms of pure stuff."

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One fan compared Cease to Carl Edwards Jr. in terms of their lanky build and high velocity, setting McLeod up for a layup joke.

"Well, Dylan is much stronger physically than CJ is...as is everybody in this room," McLeod said as the ballroom filled with laugher. "Don't tell [CJ] I said that. 

"They have different body types, obviously. Carl is long and lanky and Dylan has probably put on 20 pounds since we drafted him, so he's more like 6-foot-2, 190."

By comparison, Edwards — who goes by "The String Bean Slinger" for his slight build — is listed at 6-foot-3, 170 pounds.

Edwards was drafted in the 48th round in 2011 and spent his whole minor-league career as a starting pitcher until the Cubs converted him to a reliever in 2015.

Cease may eventually go down the same path, but the Cubs are going to give him every opportunity to make it as a starter first.

Cease was one of the top pitchers available in the 2014 draft, but his stock took a hit when he was forced to undergo Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow while at Milton High School in Georgia.

That scared off a lot of teams — as did the potential signability issues with college offers looming — but the Cubs took a chance and have now watched Cease soar to a top prospect in the system (No. 4 by Baseball America; No. 7 by FanGraphs and Baseball Prospectus) despite the cautious approach and lack of innings in professional ball.

"We have to thank Kyle Schwarber, actually, as one of the main reasons we got to sign Dylan Cease," McLeod said. "Because we took Kyle fourth overall, we were able to save money on the selection with him, which gave us the resources to go get Dylan Cease.

"He was a Top 10 pick in the draft — a high school arm that got hurt, fell down to the fifth round and he had a commitment to Vanderbilt, I think it was, and we were able to use the money we saved from Kyle.

"Just another reason to love Kyle Schwarber."