Another magazine honors Theo Epstein, as Cubs president lands on Time's list of 100 most influential people

Another magazine honors Theo Epstein, as Cubs president lands on Time's list of 100 most influential people

Perhaps it's not quite as prestigious as being named the world's greatest leader by Fortune, but Theo Epstein has another magazine honor to deal with.

The Cubs president of baseball operations landed on Time's annual list of the 100 most influential people.

Epstein wasn't the only sports figure on the list, joined by Cleveland Cavaliers supertsar LeBron James, New England Patriots championship-machine Tom Brady, Olympic gold-medal gymnast Simone Biles, Brazilian soccer star Neymar and lightning-rod quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

But the list also includes the highest-ranking officials in the U.S. government and other world leaders.

In fact, Epstein is listed in the "leaders" category, which is exclusively populated by the planet's biggest newsmakers: the heads of state of the United States, United Kingdom, India, China, North Korea, the Philippines, Russia, Turkey and Thailand; two U.S. senators; a Supreme Court justice; the Secretary of Defense; advisors to the presidents of the United States; the head of the Democratic Party; the director of the FBI; and, oh yeah, the Pope.

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Additionally, keeping in line with celebrities writing the blurbs for each of Time's honorees, Epstein is profiled by famous Cubs fan John Cusack.

Here's what Cusack wrote about Epstein:

"Theo Epstein has this weird hue around him. His vision helped end historic World Series droughts in both Chicago and Boston. But his power lies in a paradox, in the knowledge that the only way to keep power is to give it away. He knows Wrigley Field is a multigenerational secular church. Our families have been there a long, long time. We are all just renting — nobody owns this.

"Theo may be a creature of destiny, but he recognizes that he's also just another flawed human being, no better than anyone else. It's an artful thing to thread that needle and wear it as a matter of common sense. He's more Old World than old school. Words and deeds need to match. Trust is earned. He apologizes to no one for caring.

"You can see it in the eyes of those he holds close. The relationships are far more personal and dignified than people crowding around a winner. When you mention someone he truly reveres, like the historian Howard Zinn, Theo's poker face drops into a reverential smile.

"After that epic World Series Game 7, I found myself in the dugout watching first baseman Anthony Rizzo waving to the heavens. Theo was quite still — I watched him watch Rizzo. He must have felt it and turned to me, almost apologetic. 'I haven't given you a proper hug!' he said.

"'Greatest sporting moment of the century,' I told him. 'Thank you. And thank you from my father.' He took it but undercut his achievement with a wry smile. 'No,' he said, 'it's all about these guys.' Then he walked back into the fray."

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Carl Edwards Jr. didn't get a save or a win Monday night, but he was easily the most impressive pitcher on the field for the Cubs.

The 25-year-old right-hander came on in the sixth inning in relief of Eddie Butler and carved through the heart of the Nationals order, needing only 13 pitches to strike out Brian Goodwin, Bryce Harper and Ryan Zimmerman.

For starters, Joe Maddon deserves plenty of credit for deploying Edwards in an integral spot, even if it was so early in the game. But the Cubs were clinging to a 1-0 lead at the time and Maddon didn't want Butler to face the Washington order for a third time, so Edwards was the call to keep things close.

And that's exactly what Edwards did in dominant fashion. It was the fourth time this season he struck out three batters in an inning, but in the previous instances, he needed at least 16 pitches to do so.

Here is the complete sequence from Edwards to the three helpless Nats (for one inning, at least):

Harper was also locked in at the plate at the time, as it was his only strikeout in the last two games in which he's collected six hits in eight at-bats.

Edwards has been rolling this season with a 1.72 ERA and sparkling 0.82 WHIP. He has 44 strikeouts in 31.1 innings, ranking 18th in baseball in K/9 (12.64).

Since giving up three runs in an outing June 14 against the Mets, Edwards has not allowed a run in five innings, striking out seven batters and surrendering only two singles and a pair of walks.

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

The Cubs gave Kyle Schwarber time to sort things out by sending him down to Triple-A Iowa, and Schwarber's first game back in the minors shows he may need some time.

Schwarber's first game with the Iowa Cubs was a forgettable one. He struck out in his first three plate appearances before singling in his last at-bat. He struck out looking in the first inning before striking out swinging his next two times up.

Schwarber batted third in the lineup and played left field. Iowa won 1-0 against the New Orleans Baby Cakes.

He last played for Iowa in 2015, but only spent 17 games there. He hit .333 with three homers and a 1.036 OPS in that short stint. Before getting sent down Schwarber was hitting .171 with the Cubs with 12 home runs, but also 75 strikeouts in 64 games.