Can Jackson overcome strikeout woes?

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Can Jackson overcome strikeout woes?

Brett Jackson emerged in 2012 as a polarizing prospect.

The young, "toolsy" outfielder had worked his way up Baseball America's prospect ratings each of the past three seasons and had scouts and Cubs fans alike excited about the potential.

But then a crazy thing happened -- his strikeouts went from bad to worse. And then fell to just downright awful when he was called up to the majors.

Jackson struck out 126 times in 491 at-bats in 2010, then whiffed 138 times in 431 ABs in '11. He continued his collapse downhill with a whopping 158 strikeouts in just 407 ABs in Triple-A last season before tallying 59 in 120 ABs in the bigs.

Jackson, 24, actually reached a historic level with his strikeout rate. He struck out in 49.17 percent of his at-bats, which was the second-highest rate ever by a position player, with only Dave Duncan (yes, the legendary Cardinals pitching coach) coming in higher, with a 49.5 percent rate in 1967.

Baseball America has a really good feature on how players of Jackson's ilk have fared.

There are players with incredibly high strikeout rates who have had success at the big-league level, including current Cubs assistant hitting coach Rob Deer and former Cubs slugger Dave Kingman.

Then there are players who failed to meet expectations, including Brewers prospect Mat Gamel and Pirates slugger Brad Eldred.

The jury is still out on three guys, like Nationals outfielder Justin Maxwell, Mariners outfielder Trayvon Robinson and White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers.

So which category will Jackson fall under? The jury is still out on him -- just like Flowers and the others -- but he does bring a lot of other things to the table.

Jackson works the count (averaged 4.24 pitches per plate appearance in the MLB), plays solid defense in center (remember him crashing into the wall in Pittsburgh?) and displays a rare combination of power and speed (55 homers, 91 steals in minor-league career).

But the strikeouts can hold him back, especially if he continues to whiff in almost half his at-bats.

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Carl Edwards Jr. didn't get a save or a win Monday night, but he was easily the most impressive pitcher on the field for the Cubs.

The 25-year-old right-hander came on in the sixth inning in relief of Eddie Butler and carved through the heart of the Nationals order, needing only 13 pitches to strike out Brian Goodwin, Bryce Harper and Ryan Zimmerman.

For starters, Joe Maddon deserves plenty of credit for deploying Edwards in an integral spot, even if it was so early in the game. But the Cubs were clinging to a 1-0 lead at the time and Maddon didn't want Butler to face the Washington order for a third time, so Edwards was the call to keep things close.

And that's exactly what Edwards did in dominant fashion. It was the fourth time this season he struck out three batters in an inning, but in the previous instances, he needed at least 16 pitches to do so.

Here is the complete sequence from Edwards to the three helpless Nats (for one inning, at least):

Harper was also locked in at the plate at the time, as it was his only strikeout in the last two games in which he's collected six hits in eight at-bats.

Edwards has been rolling this season with a 1.72 ERA and sparkling 0.82 WHIP. He has 44 strikeouts in 31.1 innings, ranking 18th in baseball in K/9 (12.64).

Since giving up three runs in an outing June 14 against the Mets, Edwards has not allowed a run in five innings, striking out seven batters and surrendering only two singles and a pair of walks.

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

The Cubs gave Kyle Schwarber time to sort things out by sending him down to Triple-A Iowa, and Schwarber's first game back in the minors shows he may need some time.

Schwarber's first game with the Iowa Cubs was a forgettable one. He struck out in his first three plate appearances before singling in his last at-bat. He struck out looking in the first inning before striking out swinging his next two times up.

Schwarber batted third in the lineup and played left field. Iowa won 1-0 against the New Orleans Baby Cakes.

He last played for Iowa in 2015, but only spent 17 games there. He hit .333 with three homers and a 1.036 OPS in that short stint. Before getting sent down Schwarber was hitting .171 with the Cubs with 12 home runs, but also 75 strikeouts in 64 games.