Changing approach, Cubs hire Deer as assistant hitting coach

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Changing approach, Cubs hire Deer as assistant hitting coach

Following a trend, the Cubs have hired Rob Deer as an assistant hitting coach, adding another voice as they try to reshape their organization.

Deer will work closely with hitting coach James Rowson who replaced Rudy Jaramillo in the middle of last season and earned the job full-time as well as manager Dale Sveum. The Cubs confirmed the hire on Monday, which could be the beginning of a busy week leading into the winter meetings at the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, Tenn.

Sveum a former hitting coach and Deers teammate on the Milwaukee Brewers from 1986 through 1990 has strong opinions about what the Cubs should be doing at the plate.

So does team president Theo Epstein, who wants to see hitters grinding out at-bats, like those Boston Red Sox teams that played deep into October. Since coming to the North Side, Epstein has described the lack of focus on plate discipline and on-base percentage as an institutional problem.

Trying to gain an edge, the San Diego Padres, Atlanta Braves, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies are among the teams that have used two hitting coaches andor will be structuring their staff that way in 2013.

Like Rowson who used to be the minor-league hitting coordinator for the New York Yankees Deer has experience dealing with young hitters. Deer, 52, had worked as a roving hitting instructor for San Diegos system, and also developed the Viz-U-Bat training device.

Deer hit .220 with 230 home runs, 575 walks and 1,409 strikeouts during his major-league career. He led the American League in strikeouts four times, but also appeared on the leader board at different points for homers, walks and slugging percentage. Coming off a 101-loss season, the Cubs need to improve in all those areas.

Baseball Prospectus once described Deer as the king of Three True Outcomes, meaning each at-bat would typically end with a home run, walk or strikeout. Those experiences will inform the next generation of hitters at Wrigley Field.

I dont teach the way I hit, Deer told Baseball Prospectus during a 2009 interview. I'm a big guy who understands the importance of using the whole field and wants hitters to understand a two-strike approach. Those are the things I implemented in my hitting system.

I tried to teach (the) things I couldnt do. I didnt have a two-strike approach when I played, so I try to make that an important part of teaching. I didnt hit the ball the other way, so I try to make them more complete hitters by having them do something I couldnt do.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs visit White House as World Series champions

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs visit White House as World Series champions

On the latest edition of the SportsTalk Live Podcast, David Kaplan is joined by David Haugh (Chicago Tribune) and Jason Goch (SB Nation Radio) to discuss the Cubs' visit to the White House.

The guys reflect on the historic day and Theo Epstein's speech. Then, the panel breaks down the Packers' impressive run and question whether it's okay for Bears fans to appreciate Aarond Rodgers and company.

Finally, are the Wild the Blackhawks' biggest threat come playoff time?

Listen to the SportsTalk Live podcast below.

 

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama has a job for Theo Epstein whenever the Cubs executive gets bored or starts to feel restless and wants to think about life beyond baseball.  

After building up the Boston Red Sox and turning around the Cubs, how about Epstein using his leadership skills, analytical personality, sense of conviction and Ivy League education to save the Democratic Party?    

"His job is to quench droughts – 86 years in Boston, 108 in Chicago," Obama said during Monday's White House ceremony honoring the World Series champs. "He takes the reins of an organization that's wandering in the wilderness and delivers them to the promised land. I talked to him about being DNC chair."

Epstein stood behind the president doing a cut-it gesture and that became one of many laugh lines during an entertaining Obama speech that lasted more than 20 minutes and took place against the backdrop of Donald Trump's looming administration. Epstein – who headlined a Lincoln Park fundraiser during the 2012 reelection campaign and attended the president's farewell address last week at McCormick Place – doesn't see his future in politics.

At least "not as a candidate or an elected official," Epstein said during a media scrum afterward. "But I think there are a lot of ways that we can all impact our communities without necessarily running for office."

Epstein – a private person who would never want to subject his young family to that kind of scrutiny – looked like official Washington in a navy blue suit and a striped silver-and-blue tie. He delivered his own speech in the East Room, beginning it by saying "what a tough act to follow."

"We know you may have certain allegiances to another team on the other side of town," Epstein said to the world's most famous White Sox fan. "But we know you're a very proud Chicagoan. And we know your better, wiser half – the first lady – has been a lifelong and very loyal Cub fan, which we appreciate very much.

"Of course, we have great faith in your intelligence, your common sense, your pragmatism, your ability to recognize a good thing when you see one.

"So Mr. President, with only a few days remaining in your tremendous presidency, we have taken the liberty here today of offering you a midnight pardon.

"And so we welcome you with open arms."

This formal ceremony sounded personal for Epstein, who led the presentation giving Obama white and gray No. 44 jerseys, a 44 Wrigley Field scoreboard panel, a lifetime pass to the iconic stadium and an autographed W flag to someday fly at his presidential library on the South Side.  

"Everyone – no matter where you fall politically – can appreciate the dignity with which he served the country," Epstein said. "He did an unbelievable job handling the office and raising his family while here. I think, across the board, folks would agree that he's very dignified and brought a lot of integrity to the office. It was our pleasure to thank him for that today."

[RELATED: 'Among Sox fans, I'm the Cubs' No. 1 fan']

The DNC – or whatever Epstein does for his next act – will have to wait. Before that epic playoff run began, the Cubs locked up Epstein with a five-year deal believed to be worth in the neighborhood of $50 million, putting the future Hall of Fame executive in position to make another trip to the White House with a championship team.          

"Good thing I signed a contract with (chairman) Tom Ricketts," Epstein said. "He was kicking me, saying I can’t leave. It was a kind offer, though."