Choo trade gives Reds a step up in the NL Central

961809.png

Choo trade gives Reds a step up in the NL Central

While the Cubs continue to make minor moves this offseason, teams around them are pulling off big deals, from the Royals-Rays trade to the Zack Greinke signing in L.A.

READ: Cubs' offseason moves just beginning

But while those moves don't necessarily affect the Cubs, Tuesday night's trade directly impacts Theo Epstein's team.

In a three-way trade, the Reds acquired outfielder Shin-Soo Choo from the Indians, in addition to utility infielder Jason Donald. All they had to give up was outfielder Drew Stubbs (who went to Cleveland) and young Netherlands shortstop Didi Gregorius (who went to Arizona).

READ: The price the Cubs paid for Garza

Gregorius turns 23 on Feb. 18 and made his MLB debut in 2012, but boasts an underwhelming .271.323.376 batting line in his minor-league career, spanning more than 1,900 plate appearances. He has never shown much power (20 homers) or speed (40 stolen bases in 70 tries) and has not earned national recognition as a top prospect.

READ: The rundown on the Cubs' minor-league staff

Stubbs, 28, burst onto the MLB scene in 2010 with 22 homers and 30 stolen bases to go along with 77 RBI and 91 runs, but has seen his average, on-base percentage and slugging percentage drop in two straight seasons since, eventually falling out of favor in Cincinnati. The Reds were desperately looking for a leadoff man most of last season after Stubbs couldn't hang on to the gig, bogged down by a lofty strikeout total (588 in 1,791 at-bats, including a league-leading 205 in '11) and a low OBP (.277 in '12).

Choo, meanwhile, is a good get for the reigning NL Central division winners. The South Korean outfielder doesn't turn 31 until right around the 2013 All-Star break, so he's still in the midst of his prime. After three straight seasons with at least a .300 AVG and .883 OPS from 2008-10, injuries have slowed him a bit since, and he was arrested in May 2011 for a DUI.

But the outfielder spent much of his time in Cleveland as the Indians' No. 3 hitter and provides a nice balance of skills, from speed (76 steals since '09), power (80 homers since '08) and an ability to get on base (.381 career OBP). He stayed on the field for almost all of '12, posting a .283.373.441 line with 16 homers, 67 RBI and 88 runs.

Choo's patience may earn him the leadoff role on the Reds, setting the table for the likes of Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips and Jay Bruce. But no matter where he hits in the order, Choo is a major step up from Stubbs in the outfield.

The only issue is -- who plays center in Cincinnati? Stubbs was roughly average as a centerfielder, while Choo has been slightly below average in right field, so a switch to center would not be beneficial. Bruce is the other option, but he hasn't exactly played at a Gold Glove level in right for the Reds to date.

Choo is a free agent after the 2013 season and the Reds may not have the resources to retain his services, so this is likely only a one-year move. But the Reds have to be favorites to repeat in the NL Central, and if the Aroldis Chapman experiment as a starter goes well, they could garner some good World Series odds in Vegas.

Report: Aroldis Chapman returns to Yankees on five-year deal

Report: Aroldis Chapman returns to Yankees on five-year deal

After helping bring a World Series title back to the North Side, Aroldis Chapman is headed back to New York.

The former Cubs closer signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees, according to FOX's Ken Rosenthal.

He was acquired by the Cubs in July in exchange for pitcher Adam Warren and prospects Rashad Crawford, Billy McKinney and Gleyber Torres.

Chapman notched 36 saves and owned a 1.01 ERA, 0.86 WHIP and recorded 90 strikeouts across 26 2/3 innings with the Cubs during the regular season.

He appeared in 13 postseason contests, where he registered a 3.45 ERA,1.09 WHIP and 21 strikeouts in 15 2/3 innings. 

Why Cubs felt like they had to trade Jorge Soler now

Why Cubs felt like they had to trade Jorge Soler now

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – Before making the blockbuster Aroldis Chapman trade with the New York Yankees, the Cubs checked in with the Kansas City Royals about Wade Davis and found the asking price to be Kyle Schwarber. 

The psychology and the supply-and-demand dynamics are different in July. Schwarber had been damaged goods, still recovering from major knee surgery and months away from his dramatic return in the World Series. Davis also could have impacted two pennants races for his new team instead of one.
 
By the time a $10 billion industry reconvened this week outside Washington, D.C., for the winter meetings, the small-market Royals could compromise with Jorge Soler, betting on his long-term upside and facing the reality that their World Series closer could have been part of a mass exodus of free agents after the 2017 season.

The Cubs also checked into the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center knowing that Soler is a diminishing asset for a loaded team at a time when his best attribute – right-handed power – could be found on the free-agent market in sluggers like Edwin Encarnacion and Mark Trumbo.  
     
“I think there’s some great baseball ahead for him,” team president Theo Epstein said Wednesday night after the Cubs finalized the Soler-for-Davis trade. “I think it’s more likely that he reaches his ceiling now than it was 24 hours ago, because he’s got a chance to play every day.” 

Soler became a top priority within the first weeks of the Epstein administration as Cubs officials scouted the Cuban defector in the Dominican Republic before Thanksgiving 2011, picturing him as a building block for future playoff teams at a renovated Wrigley Field. 

Even chairman Tom Ricketts met with Soler’s camp during a trip to the Dominican Republic before the Cubs won the bidding war and the prospect signed a nine-year, $30 million major-league contract in the summer of 2012. 

Years later, manager Joe Maddon would describe Soler as Vladimir Guerrero with plate discipline, the kind of talent who would be drafted No. 1 overall if he had been born in South Florida. 

Soler showed flashes of superstar potential. He absolutely crushed the St. Louis Cardinals during the 2015 playoffs (2.341 OPS) and will get a well-deserved World Series ring. But he didn’t look like a complete player or an athlete the Cubs could count on to stay healthy, profiling more like a designated hitter in the American League.

“When George was playing sporadically, he became a little bit more of an all-or-nothing power threat,” Epstein said, “because it’s hard to get into a good rhythm and you’re not seeing pitches as much. You’re not recognizing spin the same way. 

“When he’s locked in, he can work really good at-bats. And he’s a hitter – not just a power hitter. So I think it’s more likely now that his potential gets unleashed at some point. We’re rooting for him.”

[SHOP: Get your Cubs gear right here] 

Maybe Soler – who still hasn’t turned 25 yet – can avoid some of the leg injuries as a part-time DH and put it all together in Kansas City as the Royals try to balance the present, the future and their financial realities. But the Cubs are a win-now team that believes Davis could get them the final out of the 2017 World Series. 

An October legend (Schwarber) and a $184 million Gold Glove defender (Jason Heyward) would keep blocking Soler at the corner spots in Wrigley Field, where a National League MVP (Kris Bryant) and a World Series MVP (Ben Zobrist) can move away from the infield. Javier Baez is another versatile, well-rounded player who would continue to marginalize Soler. 

“It became tough for us,” Epstein said, “with Schwarber looking like he’s destined to play quite a bit of left field. Not ruling catching out as an option to some extent, but he’s going to play a lot of left field. 

“And with Javy’s emergence – and what that means for Zobrist’s possible role in the outfield as well at times – it just became tougher and tougher to see George getting regular at-bats with us. 

“We felt like he needed to play – and it would have been a tough fit.”

It would have been even tougher to trade a spare outfielder during his fourth season in the big leagues. Stashing Soler – who has 27 career homers in less than 700 big-league at-bats – at Triple-A Iowa wouldn’t have been the answer. 

The Cubs saw this day coming. Schwarber wrecked his knee in early April and Soler injured his hamstring two months later and wound up missing two months.

“He just couldn’t quite stay healthy enough,” Epstein said, “and kind of slumped at the wrong time and started to get hot right before he got hurt.

“That was kind of how we envisioned it: ‘Hey, if there’s an opportunity, this guy can take the job and run with it – and then we have an even more valuable trade chip – or we’ve got an everyday leftfielder/middle-of the-order bat.’ It just didn’t quite come together. 

“But I think this trade – despite that – recouped a lot of his value. It made sense for him, for us and for the Royals.”