Coleman hopes to make a lasting impression

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Coleman hopes to make a lasting impression

Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011Posted: 2:00 a.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com Cubs Insider Follow @CSNMooney
SAN DIEGO Casey Coleman hopes to be better for the experience, though everyone knows chances like this dont come around very often.

The Cubs viewed Coleman as the ideal insurance policy to stash at Triple-A Iowa. They didnt give him many innings during spring training, and certainly didnt foresee two starting pitchers getting injured during the first week of the season.

Nothing, it seems, has gone according to plan this year. It ended for Coleman on Monday night inside spacious PETCO Park, where the Cubs lost to the San Diego Padres 2-0 while you were following the Ozzie GuillenWhite Sox drama on the South Side.

The Cubs could have a completely new management team evaluating Coleman this winter. He didnt exactly build off his 2010 finish 4-2 with a 3.33 ERA in eight starts late last season but then again you could say the same thing about the entire organization.

Once Randy Wells and Andrew Cashner went on the disabled list, the Cubs had to go out and sign Doug Davis off the street (and release him several weeks later) and acquire Rodrigo Lopez from Atlantas Triple-A affiliate.

Coleman is only 24 years old. His father and grandfather both pitched in the big leagues. With the poise, intelligence and athleticism hes shown at times, he should stay in the picture. But he didnt nail down a big-league job this season.

Coleman cruised through five shutout innings on Monday and then broke up Mat Latos no-hitter by tripling in the sixth. He was winded when he gave up a home run to Will Venable and two doubles in the bottom half of the inning.

Its been a long year, said Coleman, who was charged with two runs in 5.2 innings. I didnt handle it the right way. I went in the dugout, rested a little bit. But as soon as I got on the mound, I didnt settle myself down. I got a little dizzy out there. (You) got to slow yourself down.

In an up-and-down season, Coleman had four separate stints with the big-league club and went 5-2 with a 3.65 ERA in 12 starts at Triple-A Iowa. He flashed signs of potential, shutting down the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field and beating the Milwaukee Brewers in September. His final line reads 3-9 with a 6.40 ERA.

Just a learning experience, Coleman said. It definitely gives me more confidence going into spring training next year.

Last August, Coleman earned his first major-league victory on the same night Mike Quade got his first win as a major-league manager. For the moment, Quade is the longest-tenured manager in Chicago, and all the heat will be on the South Side.

I know its been rough over there, Quade said. Thats a whole different world that I have no interest in getting involved in. We got enough stuff to deal with over here.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs trip to White House for World Series celebration Monday on CSN, stream

Cubs trip to White House for World Series celebration Monday on CSN, stream

The Cubs make their visit to the White House on Monday for their World Series celebration, and CSN will have you covered the entire way.

CSN will air and live stream the celebration, the official White House ceremony, featuring President Barack Obama, honoring the team’s first World Series title in 108 years.

CSN will deliver complete team on-air/online coverage of the event and up-to-the-second Twitter reports from Cubs beat reporter Kelly Crull (@Kelly_Crull) and CSNChicago.com’s Cubs Insider Patrick Mooney (@CSNMooney), which will include complete highlights from the day’s big D.C. celebration on SportsTalk Live at 5:30 p.m. and on In the Loop Prime at 10:00 p.m.

CSN will also provide viewers with a special, 30-minute "Cubs Visit the White House" recap special Monday night at 7:00 p.m., which will feature ceremony highlights, interviews with Cubs players/coaches/front office execs, and much more.

A surreal offseason puts world champion Cubs in the White House spotlight

A surreal offseason puts world champion Cubs in the White House spotlight

Three days before Election Day, Alec Baldwin walked into a dressing room on the eighth floor of 30 Rockefeller Plaza to meet the Cubs in New York. Dressed in a full Donald Trump costume – but still talking in his normal voice – Baldwin chatted with Anthony Rizzo, Dexter Fowler and David Ross while they rehearsed with Bill Murray before "Saturday Night Live."     

That scene sums up the surreal nature of two seismic events colliding, the joyous victory tour that saw Kris Bryant appear on the "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" set with a goat and a bitter presidential election that pitted sides of the Ricketts family against each other.

President Barack Obama called Cubs manager Joe Maddon from Air Force One after the team ended the 108-year drought in early November, winning the franchise's first World Series title since the Theodore Roosevelt administration. Obama amplified the message he posted on Twitter: "Want to come to the White House before I leave?"

This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity will happen on Monday after about two months of scheduling and discussions, with chairman Tom Ricketts downplaying the idea that the Cubs might have stalled for his brothers Todd (Trump's pick for deputy commerce secretary) and Pete (Nebraska's Republican governor). 

This is part of the family business. Laura – their sister and another Cubs board member – has clout in Democratic circles as a superdelegate/fundraiser for Hillary Clinton. The patriarch is Joe, the billionaire TD Ameritrade founder who's heavily involved in right-wing politics. 

"There's no big conspiracy here," said team president Theo Epstein, who attended Obama's farewell address at McCormick Place last week. "Tom is a very reasonable guy. And in the end, the president invited us, and then they followed up with a real invitation. Once there was a real invitation, we figured out if we could make it work. We could, and we were happy to go."

Cubs Convention – where last year Todd made headlines by describing New York Mets fans as "really, really obnoxious" and dismissing All-Star pitcher Matt Harvey as a wannabe "tough guy" – would be the only logical offseason staging ground.

Todd did not participate in this weekend's ownership Q&A session with fans at the Sheraton Grand Chicago. The Cubs will also be in Washington this summer for a four-game series at Nationals Park, not far from Todd's nominated Cabinet position. 

Epstein paused four seconds after hearing the question: Would you have gone to the White House in June?

"Uh…" Epstein said. "Yeah, if the whole team was going, I probably would have gone.

"I'm not going to tell you what I would have been wearing. But I would have gone." 

Epstein campaigned for John Kerry in New Hampshire after the Boston Red Sox won the 2004 World Series and then shook hands with George W. Bush during that White House visit. Epstein missed the ceremonial trip with Boston's 2007 World Series team because his young son had been hospitalized and recovering from an illness at the time: "People took it as a protest, but it wasn't."

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Jake Arrieta doesn't want to be misinterpreted, either. The Cy Young Award winner explained his anticipated absence on Monday has nothing to do with his post-election "#beatit" tweet.  

Arrieta – who is dealing with family medical issues back home in Texas – said his "#illhelpyoupack" message wasn't an explicit endorsement of Trump's agenda. Arrieta said he didn't vote and aimed the tweet at Hollywood celebrities who talked about leaving the country if Trump won. 

"People view us as athletes as being Republican and only caring about lower taxes, which isn't the case," Arrieta said. "If paying higher taxes is going to benefit the majority of society, I'm fine with that. 

"It's tough when people start talking politics. But I'll be open and honest: I just want somebody to lead our country and do a good job. Whether it's Obama – whether it's Trump or Hillary – I just want to see somebody do a good job for the benefit of everybody."

Fowler will be there on Martin Luther King Jr. Day to meet the nation's first African-American president and reconnect with his old teammates after signing a five-year, $82.5 million contract with the St. Louis Cardinals. 

The Cubs had waited so long for this – winning their last National League pennant two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947 – that Fowler became the franchise's first African-American player in the World Series.

"I'm most happy for our players," Epstein said. "It's just a really special part of winning the World Series. You feel like you've finally made it. You're in the most precious building in the country, really, and you get to strut around as world champs and meet the president. 

"It doesn't get any better than that. It's very fitting that we're seeing a Chicagoan, and in his last week in office makes it even more special."

[SHOP: Gear up, Cubs fans!]

Maddon met Obama while managing the 2009 American League All-Star team at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, where the president wore a White Sox jacket while throwing out the first pitch. 

Maddon already went to the White House for a ceremony honoring the 2002 Anaheim Angels. Maddon and his wife, Jaye, also attended a small group dinner Bush's staff organized during the final days of his presidency in January 2009.  

"No matter your politics, you get invited to the White House, you go," said Jason McLeod, the senior vice president of scouting and player development. "I'm like giddy to be able to get invited on the trip." 

The Cubs are also expected to tour the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Maryland. Rizzo hopes to present the nation's 44th president with his No. 44 jersey. It will be a day in the life of the 2016 Cubs. 

"It's going to be amazing," Rizzo said. "I think everyone except the true diehard White Sox fans have a little spot for the North Side in their hearts, just because of how long it's taken to get to where we've been."