Cubs betting Castro won't believe the hype

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Cubs betting Castro won't believe the hype

Sunday, Feb. 20, 2011
Posted: 8:00 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MESA, Ariz. The Cubs believe in Starlin Castro so much that they paired him opposite Derek Jeter in their marketing campaign. He is their homegrown shortstop, in a city filled with temptations and great expectations.

All this is happening before Castros 21st birthday, which he will celebrate next month. The Cubs are confident that he can handle the attention, and all that comes with playing in a big market.

Better him to be on those billboards than me, manager Mike Quade said.

Castro hasnt seen those yet, but hes aware of the advertisements. Castro is proud of and humbled by the comparison to Jeter and what he stands for.

The runaway hopes for Castro accelerated when he homered in his first big-league at-bat. He had six RBI that night in Cincinnati, a major-league record for a debut. He finished the season hitting right at .300.

When asked Sunday what hes working on, Castro cut off third-base coach Ivan DeJesus before he could translate the question.

Defense, Castro said.

That is the point of emphasis as Castro tries to build off a rookie season in which he impressed with his offensive potential, but also committed more errors (27) than every other major-league player except for one.

By any metric, the Cubs need to improve defensively. They finished last season tied for last in the National League in fielding percentage (.979). Only two teams committed more errors (126). Their Ultimate Zone Rating (-7.3) was below average. They need to be stronger up the middle with Castro.

(Its) the ability to relax and do things second nature when its bases loaded and one out in the eighth of a tie game, Quade said. Everybodys got a little different learning curve, (but) hes talented enough that I expect him to improve quickly. (Hell) work and weve got good people pushing him.

Quade benched Castro last September and though others described it as a turning point in his six-week audition for the job, the manager does not view it that way.

That didnt happen because he thought he had it licked, Quade said. Sometimes you think its a little too much right now and maybe (it) gets taken as discipline or whatever. But it really wasnt (I) really thought it was a teaching moment for the kid to step back.

Is he not hustling? Are the mistakes lazy mistakes? Are they indecisive mistakes?

A mental lapse that he would have from time to time (is) a whole lot different than physical. You pop up a ball in the infield and stand at home plate while its caught? ... Thats not what were talking about here.

Several members of the organization visited Castro this offseason in the Dominican Republic, where he played winter ball and the Cubs are trying to mine talent and build a state-of-the-art academy.

The Cubs have a lot riding on the idea of Castro. They are not alone banking on a young star in a city where Derrick Rose an MVP candidate at age 22 packs the United Center nightly. Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane are 22 and already have a Stanley Cup banner hanging there. Jeter isnt the only model for Castro.

(Castros) grown up, said catcher Welington Castillo, another well-regarded player the Cubs signed out of the Dominican Republic. Hes got a good mentality. Hes a really good person, a good teammate. Hes always happy over here. (He) will be better, too.

Castro said he knows about the sophomore jinx, but doesnt pay much attention to it. He said he understands that you can learn by watching. He has a locker near two guys he dreamed of one day playing with Alfonso Soriano and Aramis Ramirez. He values their friendship.

Soriano took Castro under his wing last year, the same way great Yankees like Mariano Rivera and Bernie Williams once did for him in New York. Castro wont be living at Sorianos place in Chicago this season, but he doesnt have to be completely independent.

Castro brought his family out to Arizona for spring training. On Sunday Quade met Castros father for the first time. A support system is in place.

Yes, the Cubs are using Castro to sell tickets now, and in June the Yankees are coming to Wrigley Field. But Castro says hes just trying to make the team.

Theres enough veteran presence around here, Quade said. Hell remember who he is and how much work he has to do. I dont see him getting all wrapped up in that kind of celebrity or fame. If he does, he wont accomplish all the things were so excited about him possibly (doing).

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Fast Break Morning Update: Cubs visit White House; Blackhawks, Bulls in action tonight

Fast Break Morning Update: Cubs visit White House; Blackhawks, Bulls in action tonight

Here are some of the top Chicago sports stories from Monday:

Five Things to Watch: Blackhawks collide with Avalanche tonight on CSN

Five Things to Watch: Bulls host Mavericks in search of third straight win

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

Blackhawks' rough weekend 'a little bit of a wake-up call'

The state of the Bulls after the first half of the season

Reports: Dolphins assistant Jeremiah Washburn to be Bears' new O-line coach

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

President Obama, with Cubs at White House: 'Among Sox fans, I'm the Cubs' No. 1 fan'

At Cubs' White House visit, President Obama touts Michelle Obama's Cubs fandom, shouts out Jose Cardenal

Fire trade for midfielder Dax McCarty

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

Cubs meet President Obama in unforgettable, symbolic White House visit: ‘They said this day would never come’

WASHINGTON – A "Let's go, Cubbies!" chant started at 1:38 p.m. on Monday when the team walked into the East Room. One minute later, a voice from above announced: "Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the United States." 

"They said this day would never come," Barack Obama said once he got in front of the podium. "Welcome to the White House, the World Series champion Chicago Cubs."

With those words that still sound weird more than two months later, Obama began his last official event at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., rolling through a speech that lasted almost 22 minutes and delivering a powerful message on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

"Sometimes people wonder: 'Well, why are you spending time on sports?'" Obama said. "Throughout our history, sports has had this power to bring us together, even when the country's divided. Sports has changed attitudes and culture in ways that seem subtle, but ultimately made us think differently about ourselves and who we were.

"It is a game and it is a celebration. But there's a direct line between Jackie Robinson and me standing here. There’s a direct line between people loving Ernie Banks and the city being able to come together and work together."

As Washington prepares for Donald Trump's inauguration – with the neighborhood turning into a maze of risers, fences and barricades – this became a parting gift from the White Sox fan in chief to all the Obama staffers and alumni who love the Cubs and are now facing life after the White House.  

"Listen, I made a lot of promises in 2008," Obama said, "and we managed to fulfill a large number of them. But even I was not crazy enough to suggest that during these eight years we would see the Cubs win the World Series.

"But I did say that there's never been anything false about hope."

After a searing election, Obama stood front and center in between Cubs board members Laura Ricketts (a Hillary Clinton superdelegate) and Todd Ricketts (Trump's pick to be deputy commerce secretary). With a booming voice and some good speechwriting, Obama commanded a room filled with Hall of Famers (Billy Williams, Fergie Jenkins, Ryne Sandberg) and Illinois politicos (Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Sen. Dick Durbin, Rep. Mike Quigley, Attorney General Lisa Madigan, senior White House advisor Valerie Jarrett).        

Obama mentioned how his administration had hosted at least 50 championship teams in the Oval Office. Until the Cubs showed up, FLOTUS hadn't participated in any of those ceremonies, but she did make time for a private meeting with the group that ended the 108-year drought for her hometown team.    

"The last time the Cubs won the World Series, Teddy Roosevelt was president," Obama said. "Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison (were) still alive. The first Cubs radio broadcast wouldn't be for almost two decades. We've been through World Wars, the Cold War, a Depression, the space race and all manner of social and technological change.

"So the first thing that made this championship so special for so many is the Cubs know what it's like to be loyal and to persevere and to hope and to suffer and then keep on hoping.

"It’s a generational thing (that) Michelle is describing. People all across the city remember the first time their parents took them to Wrigley, their memories of climbing onto their mom and dad's lap to watch games on WGN.

"That’s part of the reason, by the way, why Michelle wanted to make sure Jose Cardenal was here, because that was her favorite player. Back then, he had a big Afro and she would describe how she would try to wear her hat over her Afro the same way.

"You could see (it in) the fans who traveled to their dads' gravesites (and) wore their moms' old jerseys to games (and) covered the brick walls of Wrigley with love notes in chalk to the departed fans whose lifelong faith was finally fulfilled."       

Obama gave shoutouts to David Ross – "we’ve both been on a yearlong retirement party" – and "my fellow 44, Anthony Rizzo." Obama congratulated newlyweds Kris and Jessica Bryant and described how chairman Tom Ricketts met his wife, Cecelia, in the Wrigley Field bleachers "about 30 years ago, which is about 30 years longer than most relationships that begin there last."

Obama turned toward groovy manager Joe Maddon, who wore a black turtleneck and an olive coat, and said: "Let's face it, there are not a lot of coaches or managers who are as cool as this guy. Look how he looks right now."

"He used costume parties and his shaggin' wagon," Obama said. "He's got a lot of tricks to motivate. But he's also a master of tactics and makes the right move at the right time, when to pinch-hit, when to pinch-run, when to make it rain."

The no-shows included Jake Arrieta, Jon Lester and John Lackey, but 22 players stood behind Obama. Dexter Fowler – the first African-American Cub to play in the World Series and now a St. Louis Cardinal – brought Obama a personalized pair of Air Jordans. The group photo included guys from Puerto Rico (Javier Baez), Venezuela (Miguel Montero and Willson Contreras), Cuba (Aroldis Chapman) and the Dominican Republic (Pedro Strop) who will be remembered together forever.

Before Obama exited the stage and the Cubs went to visit the wounded warriors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, the president delivered a final thought.

"Sports has a way of sometimes changing hearts in a way that politics or business (can't)," Obama said. "Sometimes it's just a matter of us being able to stay relaxed from the realities of our days. But sometimes it also speaks to something better in us.

"When you see this group of Cubs – different shades, different backgrounds, coming from different communities and different neighborhoods all across the country and then playing as one team and playing the right way and celebrating each other and being joyous in that – that tells us a little something about what America is. And what America can be."