Cubs bullpen steps up for Dempster

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Cubs bullpen steps up for Dempster

Monday, April 11, 2011Posted: 10:50 PM Updated: 12:15 AM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

HOUSTON Ryan Dempster might be the last player on the roster Cubs staffers worry about. They figure that all the numbers 30-plus starts, 200 innings will be there by the end of September.

That confidence doesnt erase Dempsters line from his first two starts 0-2 with a 6.59 ERA. But with 40 percent of their rotation on the disabled list, the Cubs need their Opening Day starter to perform like one.

Dempster did up to a point on Monday night at Minute Maid Park. Then the Cubs bullpen hung on for a 5-4 victory over the Houston Astros in front of 20,175 fans.

Dempster estimated that he felt good through 95 percent of this start. It was the other five percent that caused the Cubs anxiety in another close game that was in doubt until the final out.

The games entire complexion changed in the seventh inning, in a span of three consecutive batters and eight pitches. Dempster had just rung up his ninth strikeout and appeared to be cruising.

Until pinch-hitter Bill Hall drilled a 91 mph fastball off the foul pole in right field to make it a 5-2 game. Michael Bourn then drove a slider that bounced off the top of the right-field wall and a replay review kept it as a double.

Angel Sanchez next launched a two-run homer into the left-field seats and there went a night off for the bullpen. The Cubs desperately needed Dempster to go deep into this game.
Watch: Quade praises his bullpen
James Russell will leave the bullpen on Tuesday to make the first big-league start of his career in front of his family and friends. The 25-year-old Texan will let it rip for three or four innings and the Cubs will patch it together from there.

Russells father, Jeff, made a nice career and two All-Star games out of swinging between starter and a reliever. The son predicted that his dad will be nervously pacing the concourse at Minute Maid Park.

Russell said he has no clue if this is a one-shot deal. The Cubs arent in a rush to announce what theyll do when the fifth starters turn comes up again April 18 at Wrigley Field against the San Diego Padres.

Well see, manager Mike Quade said. This is an ongoing evaluative process, both how Russ throws and what other options might be available, whether theyre here with us now or whether theres somebody somewhere else.

That made Dempster who gave up four runs on six hits in 6.1 innings working into the seventh so important. John Grabow got the ball to Sean Marshall, who handed it to Carlos Marmol. The bullpen isnt completely burned out for Tuesday night.

The Cubs (5-5) kept talking about getting some breaks and instead the eighth inning saw two hard-hit singles that bounced off infielders gloves Darwin Barney leaping through the air and Aramis Ramirez diving into the dirt.

But with runners on first and third, Marshall fooled Bourn, who whiffed on a 75 mph curveball. Marmol then came in for the four-out save and struck out Sanchez with a 79 mph slider.

It was typical Marmol in the ninth inning a single and a walk in between two strikeouts to finish off the Astros (2-8). At the end of his high-wire act, Marmol screamed and pumped his fist.
Watch: Dempster feeling good 95 of the time

Ive seen him do too many crazy things to ever really panic, Dempster said. I dont really get that nervous when hes pitching. He just seems to have a knack for striking guys out and getting out of big innings.

The Cubs feel the same way about Dempster, who earned the first of what they expect will be double-digit wins. They have no other choice.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

SportsTalk Live: David DeJesus discusses time spent with Joe Maddon, World Series criticism

SportsTalk Live: David DeJesus discusses time spent with Joe Maddon, World Series criticism

"Be sexy."

That was one of two rules manager Joe Maddon told David DeJesus when the Tampa Bay Rays acquired him in 2013.

DeJesus appeared on SportsTalk Live on Wednesday to discuss his time spent with Maddon in Tampa Bay.

"Just be yourself out there," DeJesus said of Maddon when the Rays traded for him. "I want you to have fun and I want you to just have that ora of 'just don't worry, just go out there and play.' It kept the whole team loose."

DeJesus also shared his thoughts on Maddon's questionable managerial decisions in the World Series.

Hear that, and more, in the video above.

Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture

Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture

Sammy Sosa has stayed so far off the radar that his long-running absence from Cubs Convention didn't even come up during last weekend's Q&A session with ownership.

And the Cubs can't go viral all the time and dominate every offseason news cycle, with the National Baseball Hall of Fame revealing the election results on Wednesday and welcoming Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez as part of its 2017 class.

But it's become out of sight, out of mind for Sosa, who barely crossed the 5-percent threshold (8.6) needed to remain on the Baseball Writers' Association of America ballot for another year.

Sosa — a seven-time All Star, 1998 National League MVP and the franchise's all-time leader with 545 home runs (and 609 overall) — hadn't gained any traction at all during his first four years under BBWAA consideration, hovering between 12.5 and 6.6 percent.

It's complicated with Sosa, a diva personality who experienced a dramatic late-career renaissance and got named in a New York Times report that exposed him as one of the players who tested positive for a performance-enhancing drug in 2003 (during what was supposed to be an anonymous survey).

The Cubs have undergone a complete makeover since Sosa walked out in 2004, leaving him without many allies in the organization. It's nothing personal, but in the past the Ricketts family has hinted that Sosa could mend certain fences and fill in some of the blanks he once left open during an unconvincing performance in front of Congress.

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The Cubs brought Hall of Famers Billy Williams, Fergie Jenkins and Ryne Sandberg to meet President Barack Obama during their Martin Luther King Jr. Day visit to the White House and keep adding former players to the front office. It's awkward after a World Series run where so many alumni showed up to do TV work, throw first pitches, spray champagne or simply watch a rare playoff game at Wrigley Field.

— If Sosa's looking for a roadmap, Manny Ramirez did his penance and cooperated with Major League Baseball to the point where Cubs president Theo Epstein shockingly hired him as a Triple-A Iowa player/coach in the middle of the 2014 season, something that would have been unthinkable during their clashes with the Boston Red Sox.

As a hitting consultant, Ramirez took a come-and-go-as-you-please arrangement, becoming a national story during the 2015 playoffs but largely staying away from the 2016 championship team, perhaps gearing up for his independent-ball comeback in Japan this year. Even after failing multiple drug tests, one of the greatest right-handed hitters of his generation still finished at 23.8 percent in his first year on the BBWAA ballot.

— Lee Smith (34.2 percent) — a drafted-and-developed Cub and the franchise's all-time leader with 180 saves — didn't come close in his 15th and final time on the BBWAA ballot. Smith had been grandfathered when the Hall of Fame narrowed the eligibility window to 10 years, possibly trying to squeeze Steroid Era symbols like Roger Clemens (54.1 percent) and Barry Bonds (53.8 percent).

— This will make Cub fans feel old: Kerry Wood and Carlos Zambrano are Hall of Fame-eligible for the first time in 2018, when based off this year's returns Trevor Hoffman (74) and Vladimir Guerrero (71.7) should be building momentum toward the 75 percent needed for induction into Cooperstown.